Art Quotes

 A beautiful lady is an accident of nature. A beautiful old lady is a work of art. 
Author: Louis Nizer
Nationality: American
b. 6 February 1902  - d. 10 November 1994
  
 A bureaucracy is sure to think that its duty is to augment official power, official business, or official members, rather than to leave free the energies of mankind; it overdoes the quantity of government, as well as impairs its quality. The truth is, that a skilled bureaucracy is, though it boasts of an appearance of science, quite inconsistent with the true principles of the art of business. 
Author: Walter Bagehot
Nationality: English
b. 3 February 1826  - d. 28 March 1877
  
 A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. 
Author: Antoine Marie de Saint-Exupéry
Nationality: French
b. 29 June 1900  - d. 31 July 1944
  
 A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence University education. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 A good style must have an air of novelty, at the same time concealing its art. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 A great deal of the joy of life consists in doing perfectly, or at least to the best of one's ability, everything which he attempts to do. There is a sense of satisfaction, a pride in surveying such a work - a work which is rounded, full, exact, complete in all its parts - which the superficial man, who leaves his work in a slovenly, slipshod, half-finished condition, can never know. It is this conscientious completeness which turns work into art. The smallest thing, well done, becomes artistic. 
Author: William Mathews
Nationality: Greek   
 A heap of dust alone remains of thee; 'Tis all thou art, and the proud shall be! 
Author: Alexander Pope
Nationality: English
b. 21 May 1688  - d. 30 May 1744
  
 A man can be a hero if he is a scientist, or a soldier, or a drug addict, or a disc jockey, or a crummy mediocre politician. A man can be a hero because he suffers and despairs; or because he thinks logically and analytically; or because he is ''sensitive;'' or because he is cruel. Wealth establishes a man as a hero, and so does poverty. Virtually any circumstance in a man's life will make him a hero to some group of people and has a mythic rendering in the culture -- in literature, art, theater, or the daily newspapers. 
Author: Andrea Dworkin
Nationality: American
b. 26 September 1946  - d. 9 April 2005
  
 A man's got to know his limitations. 
Author: John Frederick Milius
Nationality: American
b. 11 April 1944
  
 A man's memory may almost become the art of continually varying and misrepresenting his past, according to his interest in the present. 
Author: George Santayana
Nationality: Spanish
b. 16 December 1863  - d. 26 September 1952
  
 A master in the art of living draws no sharp distinction between his work and his play; his labor and his leisure; his mind and his body; his education and his recreation. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence through whatever he is doing, and leaves others to determine whether he is working or playing. To himself, he always appears to be doing both. 
Author: Francoise Rene Auguste Chateaubriand
Nationality: French
b. December 1768  - d.  December 1848
  
 A motorcycle functions entirely in accordance with the laws of reason, and a study of motorcycle maintenance is really a miniature study of the art of rationality itself. 
Author: Robert Maynard Pirsig
Nationality: American
b. December 1928
  
 A painting in a museum hears more ridiculous opinions than anything else in the world. 
Author: Edmond de Goncourt
Nationality: French
b. 26 May 1822  - d. 16 July 1896
  
 A sense of humor is part of the art of leadership, of getting along with people, of getting things done. 
Author: Dwight D. Eisenhower
Nationality: American
b. 14 October 1890  - d. 28 March 1969
  
 A single day is enough to make us a little larger. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 A wise architect observed that you could break the laws of architectural art provided you had mastered them first. That would apply to religion as well as to art. Ignorance of the past does not guarantee freedom from its imperfections. 
Author: Reinhold Niebuhr
Nationality: American
b. 21 June 1892  - d. 1 June 1971
  
 A work of art is a corner of creation seen through a temperament. 
Author: Emile François Zola
Nationality: French
b. 2 April 1840  - d. 29 September 1902
  
 Above all, we are coming to understand that the arts incarnate the creativity of a free people. When the creative impulse cannot flourish, when it cannot freely select its methods and objects, when it is deprived of spontaneity, then society severs the root of art. 
Author: John F. Kennedy
Nationality: American
b. 29 May 1917  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 Abstract art: a product of the untalented sold by the unprincipled to the utterly bewildered. 
Author: Al Capp
Nationality: American
b. 28 September 1909  - d. 5 November 1979
  
 Abused as we abuse it at present, dramatic art is in no sense cathartic; it is merely a form of emotional masturbation. It is the rarest thing to find a player who has not had his character affected for the worse by the practice of his profession. Nobody can make a habit of self-exhibition, nobody can exploit his personality for the sake of exercising a kind of hypnotic power over others, and remain untouched by the process. 
Author: Aldous Huxley
Nationality: English
b. 26 July 1894  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 Acting is merely the art of keeping a large group of people from coughing. 
Author: Sir Ralph David Richardson
Nationality: English
b. 19 December 1902  - d. 10 October 1983
  
 Aesthetic emotion puts man in a state favorable to the reception of erotic emotion. Art is the accomplice of love. Take love away and there is no longer art. 
Author: Remy de Gourmont
Nationality: French
b. 4 April 1858  - d. 27 September 1915
  
 After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name, Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. 
Tome: The Bible
Nationality: English   
 Ah fleeting Spirit! wand'ring Fire, That long hast warm'd my tender breast, Must thou no more this Frame inspire? No more a pleasing, cheerful Guest? Whither, ah whither art thou flying! To what dark, undiscover'd Shore? Thou seem'st all trembling, shivr'ing, dying And Wit and Humour are no more! 
Author: Hadrian
Nationality: Roman
b. 24 January 76  - d. 10 July 138
  
 All architecture is great architecture after sunset; perhaps architecture is really a nocturnal art, like the art of fireworks. 
Author: G. K. Chesterton
Nationality: English
b. 29 May 1874  - d. 16 June 1936
  
 All art constantly aspires towards the condition of music. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 All art deals with the absurd and aims at the simple. 
Author: Iris Murdoch
Nationality: British
b. 15 July 1919  - d. 08 February 1999
  
 All art does but consist in the removal of surplusage. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 All art is a revolt against man's fate. 
Author: Andre Malraux
Nationality: French
b. 3 November 1901  - d. 23 November 1976
  
 All art is an imitation of nature. 
Author: Lucius Annaeus Seneca
Nationality: Roman
b. December 4  - d.  December 65
  
 All art is concerned with coming into being. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 All art, all education, can be merely a supplement to nature. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 Almost everything is imitation. The idea of The Persian Letters was taken from The Turkish Spy. Boiardo imitated Pulci, Ariosto imitated Boiardo. The most original writers borrowed from one another. 
Author: Voltaire
Nationality: French
b. 21 November 1694  - d. 30 May 1778
  
 All married couples should learn the art of battle as they should learn the art of making love. Good battle is objective and honest - never vicious or cruel. Good battle is healthy and constructive, and brings to a marriage the principle of equal partnership. 
Author: Ann Landers
Nationality: American
b. 4 July 1918  - d. 22 June 2002
  
 All men of action are dreamers. 
Author: James Gibbons Huneker
Nationality: American
b. 31 January 1860  - d. 09 February 1921
  
 All nature is but art unknown to thee; All chance, direction which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good; And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, 'Whatever IS, is RIGHT'. 
Author: Alexander Pope
Nationality: English
b. 21 May 1688  - d. 30 May 1744
  
 All the arts we practice are apprenticeship. The big art is our life. 
Author: M C. Richards
Nationality: English   
 All the while thou studiest revenge, thou art tearing thy own wound open. 
Author: Thomas Fuller
Nationality: English
b. December 1608  - d. 16 August 1661
  
 All their devices for cheapening labour simply resulted in increasing the burden of labour. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 An artist cannot speak about his art any more than a plant can discuss horticulture. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 And the first rude sketch that the world had seen was joy to his mighty heart, till the Devil whispered behind the leaves ''It's pretty, but is it Art?'' 
Author: Rudyard Kipling
Nationality: English
b. 30 December 1865  - d. 18 January 1936
  
 And when did you last see your father? 
Author: W. F. Yeames
Nationality: British
b. 18 December 1835  - d. 03 May 1918
  
 Another unsettling element in modern art is that common symptom of immaturity, the dread of doing what has been done before. 
Author: Edith Wharton
Nationality: American
b. 24 January 1862  - d. 11 August 1937
  
 Any great work of art revives and readapts time and space, and the measure of its success is the extent to which it makes you an inhabitant of that world -- the extent to which it invites you in and lets you breathe its strange, special air. 
Author: Leonard Bernstein
Nationality: American
b. 25 August 1918  - d. 14 October 19901990
  
 Any kiddie in school can love like a fool, But hating, my boy, is an art. 
Author: Ogden Nash
Nationality: American
b. 19 August 1902  - d. 19 May 1971
  
 Appreciation, whether of nature, or books, or art, or men, depends very much on temperament. What is beauty or genius or greatness to one, is far from being so to another. 
Author: Tryon Edwards
Nationality: American
b. December 1809  - d.  December 1894
  
 Architecture is the art of how to waste space. 
Author: Philip Cortelyou Johnson
Nationality: American
b. 8 July 1906  - d. 25 January 2005
  
 Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid, since she is envious. 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Ars Longa, Vita Brevis - Art (is) Long, Life (is) Short 
Author: Hippocrates
Nationality: Greek
b. December 460  - d.  December 357
  
 Art and science have their meeting point in method. 
Author: Edward George Bulwer-Lytton
Nationality: English
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 18 January 1873
  
 Art and sciences are not cast in a mould, but are found And perfected by degrees, by often handling and polishing. 
Author: Michel de Montaigne
Nationality: French
b. 28 February 1533  - d. 13 September 1592
  
 Art arises when the secret vision of the artist and the manifestation of nature agree to find new shapes. 
Author: Khalil Gibran
Nationality: American
b. 6 January 1883  - d. 10 April 1931
  
 Art consists of limitation. The most beautiful part of every picture is the frame. 
Author: G. K. Chesterton
Nationality: English
b. 29 May 1874  - d. 16 June 1936
  
 Art does not reproduce what we see; rather it makes us see. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Art establishes the basic human truths which must serve as a touchstone for our judgment. 
Author: John F. Kennedy
Nationality: American
b. 29 May 1917  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 Art for art's sake, becomes a mere rattle of words to soothe the vanity of ineffectual artisans who play with the tools of expression, but are too indolent or limited in faculty to fathom the sources of vital knowledge. Art to me is a revelation of human greatness in expression, and for humanity's sake. 
Author: Katharine Susannah Prichard
Nationality: Australian
b. 04 December 1883  - d. 02 August 1969
  
 Art has no other object than to set aside the symbols of practical utility, the generalities that are conventionally and socially accepted, everything in fact which masks reality from us, in order to set us face to face with reality itself. 
Author: Henri Bergson
Nationality: French
b. 18 October 1859  - d. 4 January 1941
  
 Art is a collarboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better. 
Author: André Paul-Guillaume Gide
Nationality: French
b. 22 November 1869  - d. 19 February 1951
  
 Art is a form of catharsis. 
Author: Dorothy Parker
Nationality: American
b. 22 August 1893  - d. 7 June 1967
  
 Art is a house that tries to be haunted. 
Author: Emily Dickinson
Nationality: American
b. 10 December 1830  - d. 15 May 1886
  
 Art is a human activity having for its purpose the transmission to others of the highest and best feelings to which men have risen. 
Author: Count Leo Tolstoy
Nationality: Russian
b. 09 September 1828  - d. 20 November 1910
  
 Art is a jealous mistress, and if a man have a genius for painting, poetry, music, architecture, or philosophy, he makes a bad husband and an ill provider. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 Art is a lie that makes us realize truth. 
Author: Pablo Picasso
Nationality: Spanish
b. 25 October 1881  - d. 08 April 1973
  
 Art is a man's nature; nature is God's art. 
Author: Philip James Bailey
Nationality: English
b. 22 April 1816  - d. 6 September 1902
  
 Art is an effort to create, beside the real world, a more human world. 
Author: Andre Maurois
Nationality: French
b. 26 July 1885  - d. 9 October 1967
  
 Art is born in attention. Its midwife is detail. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Art is born of the observation and investigation of nature. 
Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Nationality: Roman
b. 3 January 106  - d. 7 December 43
  
 Art is contemplation. It is the pleasure of the mind which searches into nature and which there divines the spirit of which Nature herself is animated. 
Author: Auguste Rodin
Nationality: French
b. 12 November 1840  - d. 17 November 1917
  
 Art is difficult, transient is her reward. 
Author: Friedrich von Schiller
Nationality: German
b. 10 November 1759  - d. 09 May 1805
  
 Art is either a plagiarist or a revolutionist. 
Author: Paul Gaugin
Nationality: French
b. 7 June 1848  - d. 8 May 1903
  
 Art is either plagiarism or revolution. 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 Art is just a pigment of your imagination. 
Author: Tony Follari
Nationality: New Zealander   
 Art is like a border of flowers along the course of civilization. 
Author: Lincoln Steffens
Nationality: American
b. 6 April 1866  - d. 9 August 1936
  
 Art is long, life is short. Ars longa, vita brevis.  
Author: Edward St. John Gorey
Nationality: American
b. 22 February 1925  - d. 15 April 2000
  
 Art is long, life short; judgment difficult, opportunity transient. 
Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Nationality: German
b. 28 August 1749  - d. 22 March 1832
  
 Art is making something out of nothing and selling it. 
Author: Frank Zappa
Nationality: American
b. 21 December 1940  - d. 4 December 1993
  
 Art is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life. 
Author: W. Somerset Maugham
Nationality: English
b. 25 January 1874  - d. 16 December 1965
  
 Art is more godlike than science. Science discovers; art creates. 
Author: John Opie
Nationality: English
b. December 1761  - d. 6 April 1807
  
 Art is not a handicraft, it is the transmission of feeling the artist has experienced. 
Author: Count Leo Tolstoy
Nationality: Russian
b. 09 September 1828  - d. 20 November 1910
  
 Art is not a thing; it is a way. 
Author: Elbert Hubbard
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1856  - d. 7 May 1915
  
 Art is not living. It is a use of living. The artist has the ability to take that living and use it in a certain way, and produce art. 
Author: Audre Geraldine Lorde
Nationality: Caribbean-American
b. 18 February 1934  - d. 17 November 1992
  
 Art is one thing that can go on mattering once it has stopped hurting. 
Author: Elizabeth Bowen
Nationality: Irish
b. December 1899  - d.  December 1973
  
 Art is science in the flesh. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 Art is the child of Nature; yes, her darling child in whom we trace The features of the mother's face, Her aspect and her attitude. 
Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1807  - d. 24 March 1882
  
 Art is the desire of a man to express himself, to record the reactions of his personality to the world he lives in. 
Author: Amy Lowell
Nationality: American
b. 9 February 1874  - d. 12 May 1925
  
 Art is the imposing of a pattern on experience, and our aesthetic enjoyment is recognition of the pattern. 
Author: Alfred North Whitehead
Nationality: English
b. 15 February 1861  - d. 30 December 1947
  
 Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known. 
Author: Oscar Wilde
Nationality: English
b. 16 October 1854  - d. 30 November 1900
  
 Art is the nearest thing to life; it is a mode of amplifying experience and extending our contact with our fellow men beyond the bounds of our personal lot. 
Author: George Eliot
Nationality: English
b. 22 November 1819  - d. 22 December 1880
  
 Art is the right hand of Nature. The latter has only given us being, the former has made us men. 
Author: Friedrich von Schiller
Nationality: German
b. 10 November 1759  - d. 09 May 1805
  
 Art is the stored honey of the human soul, gathered on wings of misery and travail. 
Author: Theodore Dreiser
Nationality: American
b. 27 August 1871  - d. 28 December 1945
  
 Art is the symbol of the two noblest human efforts: to construct and to refrain from destruction. 
Author: Simone Weil
Nationality: French
b. 3 February 1909  - d. 24 August 1943
  
 Art is unquestionably one of the purest and highest elements in human happiness. It trains the mind through the eye, and the eye through the mind. As the sun colours flowers, so does art colour life. 
Author: Sir John Lubbock
Nationality: English
b. 30 April 1834  - d. 28 May 1913
  
 Art isn't done to decorate apartments, but to wage war against the enemy. 
Author: Pablo Picasso
Nationality: Spanish
b. 25 October 1881  - d. 08 April 1973
  
 Art must be parochial in the beginning to be cosmopolitan in the end. 
Author: George Augustus Moore
Nationality: Irish
b. 24 February 1852  - d. 21 January 1933
  
 Art never expresses anything but itself. 
Author: Oscar Wilde
Nationality: English
b. 16 October 1854  - d. 30 November 1900
  
 Art not only imitates nature, but also completes it's deficiencies. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 Art produces ugly things which frequently become beautiful with time. Fashion, on the other hand, produces beautiful things which always become ugly with time. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 Art requires philosophy, just as philosophy requires art. Otherwise, what would become of beauty? 
Author: Paul Gaugin
Nationality: French
b. 7 June 1848  - d. 8 May 1903
  
 Art strives for form, and hopes for beauty. 
Author: Rose Elizabeth Bird
Nationality: French
b. 2 November 1936  - d. 4 December 1999
  
 Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life. 
Author: Pablo Picasso
Nationality: Spanish
b. 25 October 1881  - d. 08 April 1973
  
 Art-speech is the only truth. An artist is usually a damned liar, but his art, if it be art, will tell you the truth of his day. 
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 02 March 1930
  
 Art, as far as it can, follows nature, as a pupil imitates his master; thus your art must be, as it were, God's grandchild. 
Author: Dante Alighieri
Nationality: Italian
b. 14 May 1265  - d. 13 September 1321
  
 Art, like morality, consists in drawing the line somewhere. 
Author: G. K. Chesterton
Nationality: English
b. 29 May 1874  - d. 16 June 1936
  
 Artificial Intelligence: the art of making computers that behave like the ones in movies. 
Author: Bill Bulko
Nationality: English   
 Artists must be sacrificed to their art. Like bees, they must put their lives into the sting they give. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 Artists who seek perfection in everything are those who cannot attain it in anything. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 As a work of art it has the same status as a long conversation between two not very bright drunks. 
Author: Clive James
Nationality: Australian
b. 7 October 1939
  
 As artists, we must learn to be self-nourishing. We must become alert enough to consciously replenish our creative resources as we draw on them. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 As long as art is the beauty parlor of civilization, neither art nor civilization is secure. 
Author: John Dewey
Nationality: American
b. 20 October 1859  - d. 1 June 1952
  
 Attention to health is life's greatest hindrance. 
Author: Plato
Nationality: Greek
b. December 427  - d.  December 347
  
 Be always displeased at what thou art, if thou desire to attain to what thou art not; for where thou hast pleased thyself, there thou abidest. 
Author: Francis Quarles
Nationality: English
b. 08 May 1592  - d. 8 September 1644
  
 Be not affronted at a joke. If one throw salt at thee, thou wilt receive no harm, unless thou art raw. 
Author: Junius
Nationality: English
b. December 1740  - d.  December 1818
  
 Be slow to fall into friendship; but when thou art in, continue firm and constant. 
Author: Socrates
Nationality: Greek
b. December 469  - d.  December 399
  
 Beautiful young people are accidents of nature, But beautiful old people are works of art. 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: Greek   
 Because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth. 
Tome: The Bible
Nationality: English   
 Bill Clinton has mastered the art of equivocation.There is something almost inhuman in his smoother responses that sends a shiver up the spine.It is not the compromises he has made that trouble so much as the unavoidable suspicion that he has no principles to compromise. 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: English   
 Blow, blow, thou winter wind, Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude. 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Brisbane proper is a pocket-edition city. Nothing has been left out. It is not abridged, nor, we suspect, from what we observed, is it expurgated. In the height of its buildings, the congestion of its footpaths, its briskness, self-absorption, and sophistication. It is every inch a city. But the inches are not many. The city of Brisbane differs, I think from most Australian cities in that the citizens use the streets, of an evening, as a strolling place. The Brisbanian, young or old, male or female, seems to regard the lighted streets as pleasurable places in which to practice the art of elegant loitering. 
Author: Frank Dalby Davison
Nationality: English   
 Broadcast to the Nation:- How horrible, how fantastic, how incredible it is that we should be trying on gas-masks here because of a quarrel in a faraway country between people of whom we know nothing. 
Author: Neville Chamberlain
Nationality: British
b. 18 March 1869  - d. 9 November 1940
  
 Bureaucracy is the art of making the possible impossible. He who has trusted where he ought not will surely mistrust where he ought not. 
Author: Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach
Nationality: Czechoslovakian
b. 13 September 1830  - d. 12 March 1916
  
 But don't swallow up bits of other people. It digests badly and gets noticed. 
Author: Marcel Duchamp
Nationality: American
b. 28 July 1887  - d. 02 October 1968
  
 But one of the attributes of love, like art, is to bring harmony and order out of chaos, to introduce meaning and affect where before there was none, to give rhythmic variations, highs and lows to a landscape that was previously flat. 
Author: Molly Haskell
Nationality: American
b. 29 September 1939
  
 But the Devil whoops, as he whooped of old: 'It's clever, but is it Art?' 
Author: Rudyard Kipling
Nationality: English
b. 30 December 1865  - d. 18 January 1936
  
 By poetry we mean the art of employing words in such a manner as to produce an illusion on the imagination; the art of doing by means of words, what the painter does by means of colours. 
Author: Thomas Babington Macaulay
Nationality: English
b. 25 October 1800  - d. 28 December 1859
  
 Cardinal Innitzer greeted Hitler with the sign of the cross and gave assurances that so long as the church retained its liberties, Austrian Catholics would become the truest sons of the great Reich into whose arms they had been brought back on this momentous day. March 1938 
Author: John Willard Toland
Nationality: American
b. 29 June 1912  - d. 4 January 2004
  
 Civilization is the art of living in towns of such size the everyone does not know everyone else. 
Author: Julian Jaynes
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1920  - d. 21 November 1997
  
 Classic art was the art of necessity: modern romantic art bears the stamp of caprice and chance. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 Conquer thyself. Till thou hast done this, thou art but a slave; for it is almost as well to be subjected to another's appetite as to thine own. 
Author: Richard E. Burton
Nationality: American
b. December 1861  - d.  December 1940
  
 Conversation is an art in which man has all mankind for competitors. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 Creativity is allowing oneself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. 
Author: Scott Raymond Adams
Nationality: American
b. 8 June 1957
  
 Creativity is essentially a lonely art. An even lonelier struggle. To some a blessing. To others a curse. It is in reality the ability to reach inside yourself and drag forth from your very soul an idea. 
Author: Lou Dorfsman
Nationality: American
b. December 1918  - d. 22 October 2008
  
 Creativity is our true nature; blocks are an unnatural thwarting of a process at once as normal and as miraculous as the blossoming of a flower at the end of a slender green stem. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Culture is the sum of all the forms of art, of love and of thought, which, in the course of centuries, have enabled man to be less enslaved. 
Author: Andre Malraux
Nationality: French
b. 3 November 1901  - d. 23 November 1976
  
 Cunning is the art of concealing our own defects, and discovering other people's weaknesses. 
Author: William Hazlitt
Nationality: English
b. 10 April 1778  - d. 18 September 1830
  
 Death be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so. 
Author: John Donne
Nationality: English
b. 23 January 1572  - d. 31 March 1631
  
 Deliver me from writers who say the way they live doesn't matter. I'm not sure a bad person can write a good book, If art doesn't make us better, then what on earth is it for. 
Author: Alice Malsenior Walker
Nationality: American
b. December 1944
  
 Democracy is the art and science of running the circus from the monkey cage. 
Author: Henry Louis Mencken
Nationality: American
b. 12 September 1880  - d. 29 January 1956
  
 Diplomacy is the art of letting someone have your way. 
Author: Daniele Vare
Nationality: American   
 Diplomacy is the art of saying Nice Doggie! till you can find a rock. 
Author: Wynn Catlin
Nationality: American   
 Disco is to music what Etch-A-Sketch is to art. 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: American   
 Do other men before they do you, that's the real art of business. 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: American   
 Do proper homage to thine idol's eyes; But not too humbly, or she will despise Thee and thy suit, though told in moving tropes; Disguise even tenderness, if thou art wise. 
Author: Lord George Byron
Nationality: English
b. 22 January 1788  - d. 19 April 1824
  
 Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale? 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Drawing is the honesty of the art. There is no possibility of cheating. It is either good or bad. 
Author: Salvador Dali
Nationality: Spanish
b. 11 May 1904  - d. 23 January 1989
  
 Dreamer of dreams, born out of my due time, Why should I strive to set the crooked straight? 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Dreams are the true Interpreters of our Inclinations; But there is Art required to sort and understand them. 
Author: Michel de Montaigne
Nationality: French
b. 28 February 1533  - d. 13 September 1592
  
 Dying Is an art, like everything else. I do it exceptionally well. 
Author: Sylvia Plath
Nationality: American
b. 27 October 1932  - d. 11 February 1963
  
 Each body has its art... 
Author: Gwendolyn Brooks
Nationality: African-American
b. December 1917  - d.  December 2000
  
 Eloquence - The art of saying things in such a way that those to whom we speak may listen to them with pleasure. 
Author: Blaise Pascal
Nationality: French
b. 19 June 1623  - d. 19 August 1662
  
 Engineering is not merely knowing and being knowledgeable, like a walking encyclopedia; engineering is not merely analysis; engineering is not merely the possession of the capacity to get elegant solutions to non-existent engineering problems; engineering is practicing the art of the organized forcing of technological change... Engineers operate at the interface between science and society... 
Author: Dean Gordon Brown
Nationality: French   
 Engineering is the art or science of making practical. 
Author: Samuel C. Florman
Nationality: French   
 Even in literature and art, no man who bothers about originality will ever be original: whereas if you simply try to tell the truth (without caring twopence how often it has been told before) you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it. 
Author: C. S. Lewis
Nationality: English
b. 29 November 1898  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 Every artist wants his work to be permanent. But what is? The Aswan Dam covered some of the greatest art in the world. Venice is sinking. Great books and pictures were lost in the Florence floods. In the meantime we still enjoy butterflies. 
Author: Romare Bearden
Nationality: American
b. 2 September 1911  - d. 12 March 1988
  
 Every happening, great and small, is a parable whereby God speaks to us, and the art of life is to get the message. 
Author: Malcolm Muggeridge
Nationality: British
b. 24 March 1903  - d. 14 November 1990
  
 Every science begins as philosophy and ends as art. 
Author: Will Durant
Nationality: American
b. 05 November 1885  - d. 07 November 1981
  
 Every time I paint a portrait I lose a friend. 
Author: John Singer Sargent
Nationality: American
b. 12 January 1856  - d. 14 April 1925
  
 Excellence is an art won by training and habituation.We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 Faith... is the art of holding on to things your reason once accepted, despite your changing moods. 
Author: C. S. Lewis
Nationality: English
b. 29 November 1898  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 Fashion is a potency in art, making it hard to judge between the temporary and the lasting. 
Author: Elizabeth Clementine Stedman
Nationality: American
b. December 1810  - d.  December 1889
  
 Feminist art is not some tiny creek running off the great river of real art. It is not some crack in an otherwise flawless stone. It is, quite spectacularly I think, art which is not based on the subjugation of one half of the species. It is art which will take the great human themes --love, death, heroism, suffering, history itself --and render them fully human. It may also, though perhaps our imaginations are so mutilated now that we are incapable even of the ambition, introduce a new theme, one as great and as rich as those others --should we call it ''joy''? 
Author: Andrea Dworkin
Nationality: American
b. 26 September 1946  - d. 9 April 2005
  
 Finance is the art of passing money from hand to hand until it finally disappears. 
Author: Robert W. Sarnoff
Nationality: American   
 Fine art and pizza delivery: what we do falls neatly in between. 
Author: David Letterman
Nationality: American
b. 12 April 1947
  
 For Art is Nature made by man To Man the interpreter of God. 
Author: Robert Bulwer-Lytton
Nationality: English
b. 8 November 1831  - d. 24 November 1891
  
 For Art may err, but Nature cannot miss. 
Author: John Dryden
Nationality: English
b. 19 August 1631  - d. 12 May 1700
  
 Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art... It has no survival value; rather is one of those things that give value to survival. 
Author: C. S. Lewis
Nationality: English
b. 29 November 1898  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 From one Soul of the Universe are all Souls derived. . .Of these Souls there are many changes, some into a more fortunate estate, and some quite contrary. . .Not all human souls but only the pious ones are divine. Once separated from the body, and after the struggle to acquire piety, which consists in knowing God and injuring none, such a soul becomes all intelligence. The impious soul, however, punishes itself by seeking a human body to enter into, for no other body can receive a human soul; it cannot enter the body of an animal devoid of reason. Divine law preserves the human soul from such infamy. . .The soul passeth from form to form; and the mansions of her pilgrimage are manifold. Thou puttest off thy bodies as raiment; and as vesture dost thou fold them up. Thou art from old, O Soul of Man; yea, thou art from everlasting. 
Author: Hermes
Nationality: English   
 Gamesmanship or, The Art of Winning Games without actually Cheating. 
Author: Stephen Potter
Nationality: British
b. 01 February 1900  - d.  December 1969
  
 Good management is the art of making problems so interesting and their solutions so constructive that everyone wants to get to work and deal with them. 
Author: Paul Hawken
Nationality: American
b. 8 February 1946
  
 Gossip is the art of saying nothing in a way that leaves practically nothing unsaid. 
Author: Walter Winchell
Nationality: American
b. 7 April 1897  - d. 20 February 1972
  
 Great art is as irrational as great music. It is mad with its own loveliness. 
Author: George Jean Nathan
Nationality: American
b. 14 February 1882  - d. 8 April 1958
  
 Great artists are people who find the way to be themselves in their art. Any sort of pretension induces mediocrity in art and life alike. 
Author: Dame Margot Fonteyn
Nationality: English
b. 18 May 1919  - d. 21 February 1991
  
 Great is the art of beginning, but greater is the art of ending. 
Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1807  - d. 24 March 1882
  
 Great nations write their autobiographies in three manuscripts - the book of their deeds, the book of their words and the book of their art. 
Author: Walter Winchell
Nationality: American
b. 7 April 1897  - d. 20 February 1972
  
 Have little care that Life is brief, And less that Art is long Success is in the silences Though Fame is in the song. 
Author: Bliss Carman
Nationality: Canadian
b. 15 April 1861  - d. 08 June 1929
  
 I had a teacher in art school who said something about the only works he really enjoyed seeing or found much in were works where he had a sense that a discovery was made in the course of making this object. I like to hold to that as my marching orders. 
Author: Martin Mull
Nationality: American
b. 18 August 1943
  
 He had the wife, the children and the house. and it looked good, but that didn't make a relationship. He was blank, totally self absorbed. One face at home, and another to the world, he had it down to a fine art. 
Author: Suzanne Annette De Michiel
Nationality: Australian
b. 30 January 1947
  
 High culture is nothing but a child of that European perversion called history, the obsession we have with going forward, with considering the sequence of generations a relay race in which everyone surpasses his predecessor, only to be surpassed by his successor. Without this relay race called history there would be no European art and what characterizes it: a longing for originality, a longing for change. Robespierre, Napoleon, Beethoven, Stalin, Picasso, they're all runners in the relay race, they all belong to the same stadium. 
Author: Milan Kundera
Nationality: Czechoslovakian
b. December 1929
  
 High is our calling, Friend! Creative Art Whether the instrument of words she use, Or pencil pregnant with ethereal hues, Demands the service of a mind and heart. 
Author: William Wordsworth
Nationality: English
b. 7 April 1770  - d. 23 April 1850
  
 Homer has taught all other poets the art of telling lies skillfully. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 Honesty is the best part of any art form. If you don't have that, you're kidding yourself and your listener. 
Author: Billy Joel
Nationality: American
b. 9 May 1949
  
 How horrible, how fantastic, how incredible it is that we should be trying on gas-masks here because of a quarrel in a faraway country between people of whom we know nothing. 
Author: Neville Chamberlain
Nationality: British
b. 18 March 1869  - d. 9 November 1940
  
 I am one of those unhappy persons who inspire bores to the greatest flights of art. 
Author: Dame Edith Sitwell
Nationality: British
b. 7 September 1887  - d. 9 December 1964
  
 I don't mind being miserable as long as I'm painting well. 
Author: Grace Hartigan
Nationality: American
b. 28 March 1922  - d. 15 November 2008
  
 I have discovered the art of deceiving diplomats. I speak the truth, and they never believe me. 
Author: Conte di Cavour Camillo Benso
Nationality: Italian
b. 10 August 1810  - d. 7 June 1861
  
 I live in company with a body, a silent companion, exacting and eternal. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 I never saw an ugly thing in my life: for let the form of an object be what it may - light, shade, and perspective will always make it beautiful. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I strove with none; for none was worth my strife; Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art; I warmed both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart. 
Author: Walter Savage Landor
Nationality: English
b. 30 January 1775  - d. 17 September 1864
  
 I wash my hands of those who imagine chattering to be knowledge, silence to be ignorance, and affection to be art. 
Author: Khalil Gibran
Nationality: American
b. 6 January 1883  - d. 10 April 1931
  
 If an artist is not able to commit himself totally to his art, how can he expect the world to do so? 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: American   
 If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him. 
Author: John F. Kennedy
Nationality: American
b. 29 May 1917  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 If the wicked flourished, and thou suffer, be not discouraged; they are fatted for destruction, thou Art dieted for health. 
Author: Thomas Fuller
Nationality: English
b. December 1608  - d. 16 August 1661
  
 If thou art a master, be sometimes blind; if a servant, sometimes deaf. 
Author: Thomas Fuller
Nationality: English
b. December 1608  - d. 16 August 1661
  
 If thou art rich, thou art poor; for, like an ass, whose back with ingots bows, thou bearest the heavy riches but a journey, and death unloads thee. 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Illusions are art, for the feeling person, and it is by art that you live, if you do. 
Author: Elizabeth Bowen
Nationality: Irish
b. December 1899  - d.  December 1973
  
 In all thy humours, whether grave or mellow, Thou art such a touchy, testy, pleasant fellow; Hast so much wit, and mirth, and spleen about thee, That there's no living with thee, or without thee. 
Author: Marcus Valerius Martialis
Nationality: Latin
b. December 43  - d.  December 104
  
 In art as in love, instinct is enough. 
Author: Anatole France
Nationality: French
b. 16 April 1844  - d. 12 October 1924
  
 In art the best is good enough. 
Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Nationality: German
b. 28 August 1749  - d. 22 March 1832
  
 In art the hand can never execute anything higher than the heart can inspire. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 In free society art is not a weapon. Artists are not engineers of the soul. 
Author: John F. Kennedy
Nationality: American
b. 29 May 1917  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 In life, as in art, the beautiful moves in curves. 
Author: Edward George Bulwer-Lytton
Nationality: English
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 18 January 1873
  
 In oratory, the greatest art is to conceal art. 
Author: Jonathan Swift
Nationality: Irish
b. 30 November 1667  - d. 19 October 1745
  
 In order to have a real relationship with our creativity, we must take the time and care to cultivate it. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 In our life there is a single color, as on an artist's palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the color of love. 
Author: Marc Chagall
Nationality: Russian
b. 24 June 1887  - d. 28 March 1985
  
 In seeking wisdom thou art wise; in imagining that thou hast attained it, thou art a fool. 
Author: Rabbi Ben Azai
Nationality: Israeli   
 In Washington, of course, evading responsibility is an art form, so it is not always easy to tell who's responsible for which mess. 
Author: David Joel Horowitz
Nationality: American   
 It (government) is neither business nor technology nor applied science. It is one of the subtlest of the arts since it is the art of making men live together in peace and with reasonable happiness. 
Author: Felix Frankfurter
Nationality: American
b. 15 November 1882  - d. 22 February 1965
  
 It has always been difficult for Man to realize that his life is all an art. It has been more difficult to conceive it so than to act it so. For that is always how he has more or less acted it. 
Author: Henry Havelock Ellis
Nationality: British
b. 24 July 1859  - d. 03 October 1939
  
 It has been my fate in a long life of production to be credited chiefly with the equivocal virtue of industry, a quality so excellent in morals, so little satisfactory in art. 
Author: Margaret Oliphant
Nationality: Scottish
b. 4 April 1828  - d. 25 June 1897
  
 It is art itself which should teach us to free ourselves from the rules of art. 
Author: Jean-Baptiste Molière
Nationality: French
b. 15 January 1622  - d. 17 February 1673
  
 It is Homer who has chiefly taught other poets the art of telling lies skillfully. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Keep your love of nature, for that is the true way to understand art more and more. 
Author: Vincent Willem van Gogh
Nationality: Dutch
b. 30 March 1853  - d. 29 July 1890
  
 La politique est l'art d'empêcher les gens de se mêler de ce qui les regarde. (Politics is the art of preventing people from sticking their noses in things that are properly their business. 
Author: Paul Valéry
Nationality: French
b. 30 October 1871  - d. 20 July 1945
  
 Leadership: The art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it. 
Author: Dwight D. Eisenhower
Nationality: American
b. 14 October 1890  - d. 28 March 1969
  
 Learn the art of patience. Apply discipline to your thoughts when they become anxious over the outcome of a goal. Impatience breeds anxiety, fear discouragement and failure. Patience creates confidence, decisiveness and a rational outlook, which eventually leads to success. 
Author: Brian Adams
Nationality: American   
 Let each man exercise the art he knows. 
Author: Aristophanes
Nationality: Athenian
b. December 456  - d.  December 386
  
 Life beats down and crushes the soul and art reminds you that you have one. 
Author: Stella Adler
Nationality: American
b. 10 February 1901  - d. 21 December 1992
  
 Life doesn't imitate art, it imitates bad television. 
Author: Woody Allen
Nationality: American
b. 1 December 1935
  
 Life is not an exact science, it is an art. 
Author: Samuel Butler
Nationality: English
b. 4 December 1835  - d. 18 June 1902
  
 Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal; Dust thou art; to dust returnest, Was not spoken of the soul. 
Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1807  - d. 24 March 1882
  
 Life is short, the art long, opportunity fleeting, experience treacherous, judgment difficult. 
Author: Hippocrates
Nationality: Greek
b. December 460  - d.  December 357
  
 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises. 
Author: Samuel Butler
Nationality: English
b. 4 December 1835  - d. 18 June 1902
  
 Life is very nice, but it lacks form.It's the aim of art to give it some. 
Author: Jean Anouilh
Nationality: French
b. 23 June 1910  - d. 3 October 1987
  
 Life isn't long enough for love and art. 
Author: W. Somerset Maugham
Nationality: English
b. 25 January 1874  - d. 16 December 1965
  
 Like the dew on the mountain, Like the foam on the river, Like the bubble on the fountain, Thou art gone, and for ever! 
Author: Sir Walter Scott
Nationality: Scottish
b. 15 August 1771  - d. 21 September 1832
  
 Literature is the art of writing something that will be read twice; journalism what will be read once. 
Author: Cyril Connolly
Nationality: English
b. 10 September 1903  - d. 26 November 1974
  
 Logic is neither a science nor an art, but a dodge. 
Author: Benjamin Jowett
Nationality: English
b. 15 April 1817  - d. 1 October 1893
  
 Logic is the art of convincing us of some truth. 
Author: Jean de la Bruyère
Nationality: French
b. 16 August 1645  - d. 10 May 1696
  
 Logic is the art of going wrong with confidence. 
Author: Joseph Wood Krutch
Nationality: American
b. 25 November 1893  - d. 22 May 1970
  
 Logic, n. The art of thinking and reasoning in strict accordance with the limitations and incapacities of the human misunderstanding. 
Author: Ambrose Bierce
Nationality: American
b. 24 June 1842  - d.  December 1914
  
 Logic: The art of thinking and reasoning in strict accordance with the limitations and incapacities of the human misunderstanding. 
Author: Ambrose Bierce
Nationality: American
b. 24 June 1842  - d.  December 1914
  
 Many secrets of art and nature are thought by the unlearned to be magical. 
Author: Sir Francis Bacon
Nationality: English
b. 22 January 1561  - d. 9 April 1626
  
 Medicine is a science of uncertainty And an art of probability. 
Author: William Osler
Nationality: Canadian
b. 12 July 1849  - d. 29 December 1919
  
 Medicine is an art, and attends to the nature and constitution of the patient, and has principles of action And reason in each case. 
Author: Plato
Nationality: Greek
b. December 427  - d.  December 347
  
 Medicine is not only a science; it is also an art. It does not consist of compounding pills and plasters; it deals with the very processes of life, which must be understood Before they may be guided. 
Author: Paracelsus
Nationality: Swiss
b. 11 November 1493  - d. 24 September 1541
  
 Misanthropes need people; without a steady supply, the misanthrope cannot fully apply his art. 
Author: Polly Whitney
Nationality: Swiss   
 Museums and art stores are also sources of pleasure and inspiration. Doubtless it will seem strange to many that the hand unaided by sight can feel action, sentiment, beauty in the cold marble; and yet it is true that I derive genuine pleasure from touching great works of art. As my finger tips trace line and curve, they discover the thought and emotion which the artist has portrayed. 
Author: Helen Adams Keller
Nationality: American
b. 27 June 1880  - d. 1 June 1968
  
 Music can noble hints impart, engender fury, kindle love, with unsuspected eloquence can move and manage all the man with secret art. 
Author: Joseph Addison
Nationality: English
b. 1 May 1672  - d. 17 June 1719
  
 Music is the art of the prophets, the only art that can calm the agitations of the soul... 
Author: Martin Luther
Nationality: German
b. 10 November 1483  - d. 18 February 1546
  
 My friends and my road-fellows, pity the nation that is full of beliefs and empty of religion. Pity the nation that wears a cloth it does not weave, eats a bread it does not harvest, and drinks a wine that flows not from its own winepress. Pity the nation that acclaims the bully as hero, and that deems the glittering conqueror bountiful. Pity the nation that raises not its voice save when it walks in a funeral, boasts not except among its ruins, and will rebel not save when its neck is laid between the sword and the block. Pity the nation whose statesman is a fox, whose philosopher is a juggler, and whose art is the art of patching and mimicking. Pity the nation that welcomes its new ruler with trumpetings, and farewells him with hootings, only to welcome another with trumpetings again. Pity the nation divided into fragments, each fragment deeming itself a nation. 
Author: Khalil Gibran
Nationality: American
b. 6 January 1883  - d. 10 April 1931
  
 Nature does not bestow virtue; to be good is an art. 
Author: Lucius Annaeus Seneca
Nationality: Roman
b. December 4  - d.  December 65
  
 Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art. 
Author: Walter Savage Landor
Nationality: English
b. 30 January 1775  - d. 17 September 1864
  
 Nature is a revelation of God; Art a revelation of man. 
Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1807  - d. 24 March 1882
  
 Nature is what we know - yet have not art to say - so impotent our wisdom is to her simplicity. 
Author: Emily Dickinson
Nationality: American
b. 10 December 1830  - d. 15 May 1886
  
 No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight room of the soul. 
Author: Ingrid Bergman
Nationality: Swedish
b. 29 August 1915  - d. 29 August 1982
  
 No form of Nature is inferior to Art; for the arts merely imitate natural forms. 
Author: Marcus Aurelius
Nationality: Roman
b. 26 April 121  - d. 17 March 180
  
 No good work whatever can be perfect, and the demand for perfection is always a sign of a misunderstanding of the ends of art. 
Author: Walter Winchell
Nationality: American
b. 7 April 1897  - d. 20 February 1972
  
 No man is matriculated to the art of life till he has been well tempted. 
Author: George Eliot
Nationality: English
b. 22 November 1819  - d. 22 December 1880
  
 Nothing is so poor and melancholy as art that is interested in itself and not in its subject. 
Author: George Santayana
Nationality: Spanish
b. 16 December 1863  - d. 26 September 1952
  
 Nothing, it appears to me is of greater value in a man than the power of judgement; and the man who has it may be compared to a chest fulled with books, for he is the son of nature and the father of art. 
Author: Pietro Aretino
Nationality: Italian
b. 20 April 1492  - d. 21 October 1556
  
 O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo? 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 O, thou art fairer than the evening air clad in the beauty of a thousand stars. 
Author: Christopher Marlowe
Nationality: English
b. 26 February 1564  - d. 30 May 1593
  
 Of Medicine: The life so short, the art so long to learn, opportunity fleeting, experience treacherous, judgement difficult. 
Author: Hippocrates
Nationality: Greek
b. December 460  - d.  December 357
  
 Oh hast thou forgotten this day we must part? It may be for years and it may be forever; Oh why art thou silent, thou voice of my heart? 
Author: Julia Crawford
Nationality: Irish
b. December 1800  - d.  December 1885
  
 On Medicine: The life so short, the art so long to learn, opportunity fleeting, experience treacherous, judgement difficult. 
Author: Hippocrates
Nationality: Greek
b. December 460  - d.  December 357
  
 Once people start on all this Art Goodbye, moralitee! 
Author: Sir Alan Patrick Herbert
Nationality: English
b. 24 September 1890  - d. 11 November 1971
  
 One of the great undiscovered joys of life comes from doing everything one attempts to the best of one's ability. There is a special sense of satisfaction, a pride in surveying such a work, a work which is rounded, full, exact, complete in its parts, which the superficial person who leaves his or her work in a slovenly, slipshod, half-finished condition, can never know. It is this conscientious completeness which turns any work into art. The smallest task, well done, becomes a miracle of achievement. 
Author: Og Mandino
Nationality: American
b. December 1923  - d.  December 1996
  
 One puts into one's art what one has not been capable of putting into one's existence. It is because he was unhappy that God created the world. 
Author: Henry de Montherlant
Nationality: French
b. 20 April 1896  - d. 21 September 1972
  
 One science only will one genius fit, So vast is art, so narrow human wit. 
Author: Alexander Pope
Nationality: English
b. 21 May 1688  - d. 30 May 1744
  
 One thing that makes art different from life is that in art things have a shape... it allows us to fix our emotions on events at the moment they occur, it permits a union of heart and mind and tongue and tear. 
Author: Marilyn French
Nationality: American
b. 21 November 1929  - d. 02 May 2009
  
 Only through art can we emerge from ourselves and know what another person sees. 
Author: Marcel Proust
Nationality: French
b. 10 July 1871  - d. 18 November 1922
  
 Originality is the art of concealing your source. 
Author: Franklin P. Jones
Nationality: American
b. December 1881  - d.  December 1960
  
 Originality is the fine art of remembering what you hear but forgetting where you heard it. 
Author: Dr. Laurence J. Peter
Nationality: Canadian
b. 16 September 1919  - d. 12 February 1990
  
 Oscar Wilde: I wish I had said that. Whistler: You will, Oscar, you will. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Others abide our question. Thou art free. We ask and ask: Thou smilest and art still, Out-topping knowledge. 
Author: Matthew Arnold
Nationality: English
b. 24 December 1822  - d. 15 April 1888
  
 Our delight in any particular study, art, or science rises and improves in proportion to the application which we bestow upon it.Thus, what was at first an exercise becomes at length an entertainment. 
Author: Joseph Addison
Nationality: English
b. 1 May 1672  - d. 17 June 1719
  
 Painting: The art of protecting flat surfaces from the weather and exposing them to the critic. 
Author: Ambrose Bierce
Nationality: American
b. 24 June 1842  - d.  December 1914
  
 Passion is universal humanity. Without it religion, history, romance and art would be useless. 
Author: Honoré de Balzac
Nationality: French
b. 20 May 1799  - d. 18 August 1850
  
 People say conversation is a lost art; how often I have wished it were. 
Author: Ed Murrow
Nationality: American
b. 25 April 1908  - d. 27 April 1965
  
 Perpetual modernness is the measure of merit in every work of art. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 Philosophy is the art and law of life, and it teaches us what to do in all cases, and, like good marksmen, to hit the white at any distance. 
Author: Lucius Annaeus Seneca
Nationality: Roman
b. December 4  - d.  December 65
  
 Philosophy is the art of living. 
Author: Archimedes
Nationality: Greek
b. December 287  - d.  December 212
  
 Poetry is the art of substantiating shadows, and of lending existence to nothing. 
Author: Edmund Burke
Nationality: Irish
b. 12 January 1729  - d. 9 July 1797
  
 Politeness is the art of choosing among one's real thoughts. 
Author: Abel Stevens
Nationality: Irish   
 Politics is not the art of the possible. It consists in choosing between the disastrous and the unpalatable. 
Author: J. K. Galbraith
Nationality: American
b. December 1908
  
 Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it, misdiagnosing it, and then misapplying the wrong remedies. 
Author: Groucho Marx
Nationality: American
b. 2 October 1890  - d. 19 July 1977
  
 Politics is the gentle art of getting votes from the poor and campaign funds from the rich by promising to protect each from the other. 
Author: Oscar Ameringer
Nationality: American
b. December 1870
  
 Popular art is the dream of society; it does not examine itself. 
Author: Margaret Eleanor Atwood
Nationality: Canadian
b. 18 November 1939
  
 Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday. 
Author: Donald Robert Perry Marquis
Nationality: American
b. 29 July 1878  - d. 29 December 1937
  
 Propaganda is the art of persuading others of what you don't believe yourself. 
Author: Ausonius
Nationality: Roman
b. December 310  - d.  December 395
  
 Pull down thy vanity Thou art a beaten dog beneath the hail, A swollen magpie is a fitful sun, Half black half white Not knowst you wing from tail' Pull down thy vanity. 
Author: Ezra Pound
Nationality: American
b. 30 October 1885  - d. 1 November 1972
  
 Raiding an Englishman's fridge is like dating a nun: You're never gonna get the good stuff. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Real art is without irony.Irony distances the Literature from his material.Irony is a product of something.It's not the reason for doing something.Irony is a cheap shot. 
Author: Robert Altman
Nationality: American
b. 20 February 1925  - d. 20 November 2006
  
 Replying to the question 'For two days' labour, you ask two hundred guineas? No, I ask it for the knowledge of a lifetime. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Resolve and thou art free. 
Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1807  - d. 24 March 1882
  
 Revolutionary politics, revolutionary art, and oh, the revolutionary mind, is the dullest thing on earth. When we open a ''revolutionary'' review, or read a ''revolutionary'' speech, we yawn our heads off. It is true, there is nothing else. Everything is correctly, monotonously, dishearteningly ''revolutionary.'' What a stupid word! What a stale fuss! 
Author: Wyndham Lewis
Nationality: Canadian
b. 18 November 1882  - d. 07 March 1957
  
 Science and art belong to the whole world, And before them vanish the barriers of nationality. 
Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Nationality: German
b. 28 August 1749  - d. 22 March 1832
  
 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate. Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May And summer's lease hath all too short a date. 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Silence is one great art of conversation. 
Author: William Hazlitt
Nationality: English
b. 10 April 1778  - d. 18 September 1830
  
 Silence is one of the great arts of conversation, as allowed by Cicero himself, who says, 'there is not only an art, but an eloquence in it.' A well bred woman may easily and effectually promote the most useful and elegant conversation without speaking a word. The modes of speech are scarcely more variable than the modes of silence. 
Author: Tom Blair
Nationality: English   
 Skill without imagination is craftsmanship and gives us many useful objects such as wickerwork picnic baskets. Imagination without skill gives us modern art. 
Author: Tom Stoppard
Nationality: British
b. 3 July 1937
  
 Sleep, to the homeless thou art home; the friendless find in thee a friend. 
Author: Ebenezer Elliott
Nationality: English
b. 17 March 1781  - d. 1 December 1849
  
 Sleeping is no mean art; for its sake one must stay awake all day. 
Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Nationality: German
b. 15 October 1844  - d. 25 August 1900
  
 So many gods, so many creeds, So many paths that wind and wind, When just the art of being kind Is all the sad world needs. 
Author: Ella Wheeler Wilcox
Nationality: American
b. 5 November 1855  - d. 30 October 1919
  
 So weak thou art that fools thy power despise; And yet so strong, thou triumph'st o'er the wise. 
Author: Jonathan Swift
Nationality: Irish
b. 30 November 1667  - d. 19 October 1745
  
 Speak the truth, do not yield to anger; give, if thou art asked for little; by these three steps thou wilt go near the gods. 
Tome: The Dhammapada
Nationality: Irish   
 Sticks and stones are hard on bones, aimed with angry art, words can sting like anything but silence breaks the heart. 
Author: Phyllis McGinley
Nationality: American
b. 21 March 1905  - d. 22 February 1978
  
 Supreme art is a traditional statement of certain heroic and religious truth, passed on from age to age, modified by individual genius, but never abandoned. 
Author: W. B. Yeats
Nationality: Irish
b. 13 June 1865  - d. 28 January 1939
  
 Surely all art is the result of one's having been in danger, of having gone through an experience all the way to the end, where no one can go any further. 
Author: Rainer Maria Rilke
Nationality: Austrian
b. 4 December 1875  - d. 29 December 1926
  
 Teachers believe they have a gift for giving; it drives them with the same irrepressible drive that drives others to create a work of art or a market or a building. 
Author: A. Bartlett Giamatti
Nationality: American
b. 04 April 1938  - d. 01 September 1989
  
 Teaching is an instinctual art, mindful of potential, craving of realizations, a pausing, seamless process. 
Author: A. Bartlett Giamatti
Nationality: American
b. 04 April 1938  - d. 01 September 1989
  
 Teaching is the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying it afterwards. 
Author: Anatole France
Nationality: French
b. 16 April 1844  - d. 12 October 1924
  
 Technology adds nothing to art. Two thousand years ago, I could tell you a story, and at any point during the story I could stop, and ask, Now do you want the hero to be kidnapped, or not? But that would, of course, have ruined the story. Part of the experience of being entertained is sitting back and plugging into someone else's vision. 
Author: Penn Fraser Jillette
Nationality: American
b. 5 March 1955
  
 Tell me thy company, and I will tell thee what thou art. 
Author: Miguel de Cervantes
Nationality: Spanish
b. 29 September 1547  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 The ability to get to the verge without getting into the war is the necessary art.... If you try to run away from it, if you are scared to go to the brink, you are lost. 
Author: John Foster Dulles
Nationality: American
b. 25 February 1888  - d. 24 May 1959
  
 The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 The art of a people is a true mirror of their minds. 
Author: Jawaharial Nehru
Nationality: Indian
b. 14 November 1889  - d. 27 May 1964
  
 The art of acceptance is the art of making someone who has just done you a small favor wish that he might have done you a greater one. 
Author: Russell Lynes
Nationality: American
b. December 1910  - d.  December 1991
  
 The art of advertisement, after the American manner, has introduced into all our life such a lavish use of superlatives, that no standard of value whatever is intact. 
Author: Wyndham Lewis
Nationality: Canadian
b. 18 November 1882  - d. 07 March 1957
  
 The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook. 
Author: William James
Nationality: American
b. 11 January 1842  - d. 26 August 1910
  
 The art of dining well is no slight art, the pleasure not a slight pleasure. 
Author: Michel de Montaigne
Nationality: French
b. 28 February 1533  - d. 13 September 1592
  
 The art of effective teaching is much rarer than the faculty of acquiring knowledge. 
Author: Charles Harpur
Nationality: Australian
b. 23 January 1813  - d. 10 June 1868
  
 The art of life has a pudency, and will not be exposed. Every man is an impossibility, until he is born; every thing impossible, until we see a success. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 The art of life is the art of avoiding pain. 
Author: Thomas Jefferson
Nationality: American
b. 13 April 1743  - d. 4 July 1826
  
 The art of life is to know how to enjoy a little and to endure very much. 
Author: William Hazlitt
Nationality: English
b. 10 April 1778  - d. 18 September 1830
  
 The art of living does not consist in preserving and clinging to a particular mood of happiness, but in allowing happiness to change its form without being disappointed by the change; for happiness, like a child, must be allowed to grow up. 
Author: Charles Langbridge Morgan
Nationality: English
b. 22 January 1894  - d. 06 February 1958
  
 The art of living is more like that of wrestling than of dancing; the main thing is to stand firm and be ready for an unseen attack. 
Author: Marcus Aurelius
Nationality: Roman
b. 26 April 121  - d. 17 March 180
  
 The art of losing isn't hard to master. 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: Roman   
 The art of mothering is to teach the art of living to children. 
Author: Elain Heffner
Nationality: Roman   
 The art of pleasing consists in being pleased. 
Author: William Hazlitt
Nationality: English
b. 10 April 1778  - d. 18 September 1830
  
 The art of progress is to preserve order amid change, and to preserve change amid order. Life refuses to be embalmed alive. 
Author: Alfred North Whitehead
Nationality: English
b. 15 February 1861  - d. 30 December 1947
  
 The art of resting the mind and the power of dismissing from it all care and worry is probably one of the secrets of our great men. 
Author: Captain J. A. Hatfield
Nationality: English   
 The art of taxation consists in so plucking the goose as to obtain the largest amount of feathers with the least amount of hissing. 
Author: Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Nationality: French
b. 29 August 1619  - d. 6 September 1683
  
 The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike at him as hard as you can and as often as you can, and keep moving on. 
Author: Ulysses S. Grant
Nationality: American
b. 27 April 1822  - d. 23 July 1885
  
 The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must be ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation. 
Author: Auguste Rodin
Nationality: French
b. 12 November 1840  - d. 17 November 1917
  
 The artist who aims at perfection in everything achieves it in nothing. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 The artists must be sacrificed to their art. Like the bees, they must put their lives into the sting they give. 
Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1803  - d. 27 April 1882
  
 The beautiful, which is perhaps inseparable from art, is not after all tied to the subject, but to the pictorial representation. In this way and in no other does art overcome the ugly without avoiding it. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 The best advice on the art of being happy is about as easy to follow as advice to be well when one is sick. 
Author: Anne Swetchine
Nationality: Russian
b. December 1782  - d.  December 1857
  
 The counterfeit and counterpart Of Nature reproduced in art. 
Author: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Nationality: American
b. 27 February 1807  - d. 24 March 1882
  
 The course of Nature is the art of God. 
Author: Edward Young
Nationality: English
b. 3 July 1681  - d. 5 April 1765
  
 In general, the art of government consists in taking as much money as possible from one party of the citizens to give to the other. 
Author: Voltaire
Nationality: French
b. 21 November 1694  - d. 30 May 1778
  
 The existence of good bad literature - the fact that one can be amused or excited or even moved by a book that one's intellect simply refuses to take seriously - is a reminder that art is not the same thing as celebration. 
Author: George Orwell
Nationality: English
b. 25 June 1903  - d. 21 January 1950
  
 The final revelation is that Lying, the telling of beautiful untrue things, is the proper aim of Art. 
Author: Oscar Wilde
Nationality: English
b. 16 October 1854  - d. 30 November 1900
  
 The finest works of art are precious, among other reasons, because they make it possible for us to know, if only imperfectly and for a little while, what it actually feels like to think subltly and feel nobly. 
Author: Aldous Huxley
Nationality: English
b. 26 July 1894  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 The first virtue of a painting is to be a feast for the eyes. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 The great art of giving consists in this: the gift should cost very little and yet be greatly coveted, so that it may be the more highly appreciated. 
Author: Baltasar Gracián
Nationality: Spanish
b. 08 January 1601  - d. 06 December 1658
  
 The great art of writing is the art of making people real to themselves with words. 
Author: Logan Pearsall Smith
Nationality: American
b. 18 October 1865  - d. 02 March 1946
  
 'The Guide says that there is an art to flying,' said Ford, 'or rather a knack. The knack lies in learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss.' 
Author: Douglas Adams
Nationality: English
b. 11 March 1952  - d. 11 May 2001
  
 The highest problem of any art is to cause by appearance the illusion of a higher reality. 
Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Nationality: German
b. 28 August 1749  - d. 22 March 1832
  
 The ideal should never touch the real; When nature conquers, Art must then give way. 
Author: Friedrich von Schiller
Nationality: German
b. 10 November 1759  - d. 09 May 1805
  
 The literary critic, or the critic of any other specific form of artistic expression, may detach himself from the world for as long as the work of art he is contemplating appears to do the same. 
Author: Clive James
Nationality: Australian
b. 7 October 1939
  
 The love of art for art's sake. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 The man's the work. Something doesn't come out of nothing. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 The mere mechanical technique of acting can be taught, but the spirit that is to give life to lifeless forms must be born in a man. No dramatic college can teach its pupils to think or to feel. It is Nature who makes our artists for us, though it may be Art who taught them their right mode of expression. 
Author: Oscar Wilde
Nationality: English
b. 16 October 1854  - d. 30 November 1900
  
 The most beautiful emotion we can experience is the mysterious. It is the power of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead. To know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their most primitive forms -- this knowledge, this feeling, is at the center of true religiousness. In this sense, and in this sense only, I belong to the rank of devoutly religious men. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 The object of art is to crystallize emotion into thought, And then fix it in form. 
Author: Francois Delsarte
Nationality: French
b. 11 December 1811  - d. 20 July 1871
  
 The only success worth one's powder was success in the line of one's idiosyncrasy . what was talent but the art of being completely whatever one happened to be? 
Author: Henry James
Nationality: American
b. 15 April 1843  - d. 28 February 1916
  
 ... the patriotic art of lying for one's country. 
Author: Ambrose Bierce
Nationality: American
b. 24 June 1842  - d.  December 1914
  
 The people who make art their business are mostly imposters. 
Author: Pablo Picasso
Nationality: Spanish
b. 25 October 1881  - d. 08 April 1973
  
 The person who knows one thing and does it better than anyone else, even if it only be the art of raising lentils, receives the crown he merits. If he raises all his energy to that end, he is a benefactor of mankind and its rewarded as such. 
Author: Og Mandino
Nationality: American
b. December 1923  - d.  December 1996
  
 The poet must be alike polished by an intercourse with the world as with the studies of taste; one to whom labour is negligence, refinement a science, and art a nature. 
Author: Isaac D'Israeli
Nationality: English
b. 11 May 1766  - d. 19 January 1848
  
 The price we pay when pursuing any art or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side. 
Author: James Arthur Baldwin
Nationality: American
b. 2 August 1924  - d. 30 November 1987
  
 The purpose of art is to lay bare the questions which have been hidden by the answers. 
Author: James Arthur Baldwin
Nationality: American
b. 2 August 1924  - d. 30 November 1987
  
 The sight of a Black nun strikes their sentimentality; and, as I am unalterably rooted in native ground, they consider me a work of primitive art, housed in a magical color; the incarnation of civilized, anti-heathenism, and the fruit of a triumphing idea. 
Author: Alice Malsenior Walker
Nationality: American
b. December 1944
  
 The stage is not merely the meeting place of all the arts, but is also the return of art to life. 
Author: Oscar Wilde
Nationality: English
b. 16 October 1854  - d. 30 November 1900
  
 The trouble is that you are only interested in art, and I am only interested in money. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 The true art of government consists in not governing too much. 
Author: Jonathan Shipley
Nationality: English
b. December 1714  - d.  December 1788
  
 The true artist will let his wife starve, his children go barefoot, his mother drudge for his living at seventy, sooner than work at anything but his art. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. 
Author: Michelangelo
Nationality: Italian
b. 6 March 1475  - d. 18 February 1564
  
 The two World Wars came in part, like much modern literature and art, because men, whose nature is to tire of everything in turn, tired of common sense and civilization. 
Author: F. L. Lucas
Nationality: English
b. December 1894  - d.  December 1967
  
 The violet droops its soft and bashful brow, But from its heart sweet incense fills the air; So rich within - so pure without - art thou, With modest mien and soul of virtue rare. 
Author: Frances Sargent Osgood
Nationality: American
b. 18 June 1811  - d. 12 May 1850
  
 The weather-cock on the church spire, though made of iron, would soon be broken by the storm-wind if it... did not understand the noble art of turning to every wind. 
Author: Heinrich Heine
Nationality: German
b. 13 December 1797  - d. 17 February 1856
  
 The whole art of government consists in the art of being honest. 
Author: Thomas Jefferson
Nationality: American
b. 13 April 1743  - d. 4 July 1826
  
 The whole art of politics consists in directing rationally the irrationalities of men. 
Author: Reinhold Niebuhr
Nationality: American
b. 21 June 1892  - d. 1 June 1971
  
 The whole art of teaching is only the art of awakening the natural curiosity of young minds for the purpose of satisfying it afterwards. 
Author: Anatole France
Nationality: French
b. 16 April 1844  - d. 12 October 1924
  
 The work of art may have a moral effect, but to demand moral purpose from the artist is to make him ruin his work. 
Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Nationality: German
b. 28 August 1749  - d. 22 March 1832
  
 The work of art must seize upon you, wrap you up in itself and carry you away. It is the means by which the artist conveys his passion. It is the current which he puts forth which sweeps you along in his passion. 
Author: Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Nationality: French
b. 25 February 1841  - d. 03 December 1919
  
 The worst moment for the atheist is when he is really thankful, and has nobody to thank. 
Author: Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Nationality: English
b. 12 May 1828  - d. 9 April 1882
  
 The writer's only responsibility is to his art... If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' is worth any number of old ladies. 
Author: William Faulkner
Nationality: American
b. 25 September 1897  - d. 06 July 1962
  
 Theater is life, film is art, television is furniture. 
Author: Anonymous
Nationality: American   
 There are painters who transform the sun to a yellow spot, but there are others who with the help of their art and their intelligence, transform a yellow spot into the sun. 
Author: Pablo Picasso
Nationality: Spanish
b. 25 October 1881  - d. 08 April 1973
  
 There are so many opportunities in life, that the loss of two or three capabilities is not necessarily debilitating. A handicap can give you the opportunity to focus more on art, writing, or music. 
Author: Jim Robert Davis
Nationality: American
b. 28 July 1945
  
 There are three things I have loved but never understood. Art, music and women. 
Author: Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle
Nationality: French
b. 11 February 1657  - d. 09 January 1757
  
 There art two cardinal sins from which all others spring: Impatience and Laziness. 
Author: Franz Harrington
Nationality: Austrian
b. 3 July 1883  - d. 3 June 1924
  
 There is an art of reading, as well as an art of thinking, and an art of writing. 
Author: Benjamin Disraeli
Nationality: British
b. 21 December 1804  - d. 19 April 1881
  
 There is in fact no such thing as art for art's sake, art that stands above classes, art that is detached from or independent of politics. Proletarian literature and art are part of the whole proletarian revolutionary cause. 
Author: Mao Tse-Tung
Nationality: Chinese
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1976
  
 There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality. 
Author: Pablo Picasso
Nationality: Spanish
b. 25 October 1881  - d. 08 April 1973
  
 There is no such thing as modern art. There is art-and there is advertising. 
Author: Albert Sterner
Nationality: Spanish   
 There is nothing but art. Art is living. To attempt to give an object of art life by dwelling on its historical, cultural, or archaeological association is senseless. 
Author: W. Somerset Maugham
Nationality: English
b. 25 January 1874  - d. 16 December 1965
  
 There is nothing too little for so little a creature as man. It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible. 
Author: Dr. Johnson
Nationality: English
b. December 1709  - d.  December 1784
  
 There is one art of which man should be master, the art of reflection. 
Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Nationality: English
b. 21 October 1772  - d. 25 July 1834
  
 There is the falsely mystical view of art that assumes a kind of supernatural inspiration, a possession by universal forces unrelated to questions of power and privilege or the artist's relation to bread and blood. In this view, the channel of art can only become clogged and misdirected by the artist's concern with merely temporary and local disturbances. The song is higher than the struggle. 
Author: Adrienne Rich
Nationality: American
b. 16 May 1929
  
 There's no bigger trip than self-importance - to blind you, to decrease the energy of your art. 
Author: Jim Harrison
Nationality: American
b. 11 December 1937
  
 Things perfected by nature are better than those finished by art. 
Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Nationality: Roman
b. 3 January 106  - d. 7 December 43
  
 Think, and be careful what thou art within; For there is sin in the desire of sin; Think, and be thankful, in a different case; For there is grace in the desire of grace. 
Author: John Byrom
Nationality: English
b. 29 February 1692  - d. 26 September 1763
  
 This art of resting the mind and the power of dismissing from it all care and worry is probably one of the secrets of energy in our great men. 
Author: Captain J. A. Hadfield
Nationality: English   
 This grandiose tragedy that we call modern art. 
Author: Salvador Dali
Nationality: Spanish
b. 11 May 1904  - d. 23 January 1989
  
 This is an art Which does mend nature - change it rather; but The art itself is nature. 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Those little nimble musicians of the air, that warble forth their curious ditties, with which nature hath furnished them to the shame of art. 
Author: Izaak Walton
Nationality: English
b. 9 August 1593  - d. 15 December 1683
  
 Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well. 
Author: Aristotle
Nationality: Greek
b. December 384  - d.  December 322
  
 Thou art a cat, and a rat, and a coward. 
Author: Miguel de Cervantes
Nationality: Spanish
b. 29 September 1547  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Thou art a traitor: Off with his head! 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Thou art my glory and the exultation of y heart: thou art my hope and refuge in the day of my trouble. 
Author: Thomas à Kempis
Nationality: German
b. December 1380  - d.  December 1471
  
 Thou must be emptied of that wherewith thou art full, that thou mayest be filled with that whereof thou art empty. 
Author: Saint Augustine
Nationality: Numidian
b. 13 November 354  - d. 28 August 430
  
 To a lady who said the two greatest painters were Whistler and Velasquez: Why drag in Velasquez? 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 To affect the quality of the day; that is the art of life. 
Author: Henry David Thoreau
Nationality: American
b. 12 July 1817  - d. 6 May 1862
  
 To array a man's will against his sickness is the supreme Art of medicine. 
Author: Henry Ward Beecher
Nationality: American
b. 24 June 1813  - d. 8 March 1887
  
 To burn always with this hard, gemlike flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 To catch a husband is an art; to hold him is a job. 
Author: Simone de Beauvoir
Nationality: French
b. 9 January 1908  - d. 14 April 1986
  
 To curb the machine and limit art to handicraft is a denial of opportunity. 
Author: Lewis Mumford
Nationality: American
b. 19 October 1895  - d. 26 January 1990
  
 To hide her cares her only art; Her pleasure, pleasures to impart. 
Author: Thomas Gray
Nationality: English
b. 26 December 1716  - d. 30 July 1771
  
 To improve the golden moment of opportunity, and catch the good that is within our reach, is the great art of life. 
Author: Dr. Johnson
Nationality: English
b. December 1709  - d.  December 1784
  
 To know how to grow old is the master work of wisdom, And one of the most difficult chapters in the great art of living. 
Author: Henri-Frédéric Amiel
Nationality: Swiss
b. 27 September 1821  - d. 11 May 1881
  
 To know how to live is all my calling and all my art. 
Author: Michel de Montaigne
Nationality: French
b. 28 February 1533  - d. 13 September 1592
  
 To know how to suggest is the great art of teaching.To attain it we must be able to guess what will interest; we must learn to read the childish soul as we might a piece of music.Then, by simply changing the key, we keep up the attraction and vary the song. 
Author: Henri-Frédéric Amiel
Nationality: Swiss
b. 27 September 1821  - d. 11 May 1881
  
 To listen closely and reply well is the highest perfection we are able to attain in the art of conversation. 
Author: François de La Rochefoucauld
Nationality: French
b. 15 September 1613  - d. 17 March 1680
  
 To my mind the old masters are not art; their value is in their scarcity. 
Author: Thomas Alva Edison
Nationality: American
b. 11 February 1847  - d. 18 October 1931
  
 To say a compliment well is a high art and few possess it. 
Author: Mark Twain
Nationality: American
b. 30 November 1835  - d. 21 April 1910
  
 To say nothing, especially when speaking, is half the art of diplomacy. 
Author: Will Durant
Nationality: American
b. 05 November 1885  - d. 07 November 1981
  
 To say that a work of art is good, but incomprehensible to the majority of men, is the same as saying of some kind of food that it is very good but that most people can't eat it. 
Author: Count Leo Tolstoy
Nationality: Russian
b. 09 September 1828  - d. 20 November 1910
  
 To speak of morals in art is to speak of legislature in sex. Art is the sex of the imagination. 
Author: George Jean Nathan
Nationality: American
b. 14 February 1882  - d. 8 April 1958
  
 To write or even speak English is not a science but an art. There are no reliable words. Whoever writes English is involved in a struggle that never lets up even for a sentence. He is struggling against vagueness, against obscurity, against the lure of the decorative adjective, against the encroachment of Latin and Greek, and, above all, against the worn-out phrases and dead metaphors with which the language is cluttered up. 
Author: George Orwell
Nationality: English
b. 25 June 1903  - d. 21 January 1950
  
 Today it is prosperity that is externally ugly ... we sit starving amidst our gold, the Midas of the Ages. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 True art is characterized by an irresistible urge in the creative artist. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, As those move easiest who have learned to dance. 'Tis not enough no harshness gives offence, The sound must seem an echo to the sense. 
Author: Alexander Pope
Nationality: English
b. 21 May 1688  - d. 30 May 1744
  
 True science investigates and brings to human perception such truths and such knowledge as the people of a given time and society consider most important. Art transmits these truths from the region of perception to the region of emotion. 
Author: Count Leo Tolstoy
Nationality: Russian
b. 09 September 1828  - d. 20 November 1910
  
 Truth is the secret of eloquence and virtue, the basis of moral Literatureity; it is the highest summit of art and of life. 
Author: Henri-Frédéric Amiel
Nationality: Swiss
b. 27 September 1821  - d. 11 May 1881
  
 Unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare, forked animal as thou art. 
Author: William Shakespeare
Nationality: English
b. December 1564  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 Until it is kindled by a spirit as flamingly alive as the one which gave it birth a book is dead to us. Words divested of their magic are but dead hieroglyphs. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 Vision is the art of seeing the invisible. 
Author: Jonathan Swift
Nationality: Irish
b. 30 November 1667  - d. 19 October 1745
  
 War - the trade of barbarians, and the art of bringing the greatest physical force to bear on a single point. 
Author: Napoleon Bonaparte
Nationality: French
b. 15 August 1769  - d. 5 May 1821
  
 War: the trade of barbarians, and the art of bringing the greatest physical force to bear on a single point. 
Author: Emperor Napoleon I
Nationality: French
b. 15 August 1769  - d. 5 May 1821
  
 We are all going to Heaven, and Vandyke is of the company. 
Author: Thomas Gainsborough
Nationality: English
b. December 1727  - d.  December 1788
  
 We are all hungry and thirsty for concrete images. Abstract art will have been good for one thing: to restore its exact virginity to figurative art. 
Author: Salvador Dali
Nationality: Spanish
b. 11 May 1904  - d. 23 January 1989
  
 We must never forget that art is not a form of propaganda, it is a form of truth. 
Author: John F. Kennedy
Nationality: American
b. 29 May 1917  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 What can be more foolish than to think that all this rare fabric of heaven and earth could come by chance, when all the skill of art is not able to make an oyster! 
Author: Bishop Jeremy Taylor
Nationality: English
b. December 1613  - d. 13 August 1667
  
 What is art but a way of seeing? 
Author: Thomas Louis Berger
Nationality: American
b. 20 July 1924
  
 What is art? Nature concentrated. 
Author: Honoré de Balzac
Nationality: French
b. 20 May 1799  - d. 18 August 1850
  
 What was any art but a mold in which to imprison for a moment the shining, elusive element which is life itself. 
Author: Willa Silbert Cather
Nationality: American
b. December 1876  - d.  December 1947
  
 What we call reality is an agreement that people have arrived at to make life more livable. 
Author: Louise Nevelson
Nationality: American
b. 23 September 1900  - d. 17 April 1988
  
 What would it be like if you lived each day, each breath, as a work of art in progress? Imagine that you are a Masterpiece unfolding, every second of every day, a work of art taking form with every breath. 
Author: Thomas Crum
Nationality: American   
 Whatever was required to be done, the Circumlocution Office was beforehand with all the public departments in the art of perceiving - How Not To Do It. 
Author: Charles Dickens
Nationality: English
b. 7 February 1812  - d. 9 June 1870
  
 When Lord Beauchamp, Governor of New South Wales, wrote a fulsome letter to Mo telling him 'Your art is an important expression of the Australian ethos' Mo commented 'Gor blimey, I hope that's a compliment!' 
Author: Roy Rene
Nationality: Australian
b. 15 February 1892  - d. 22 November 1954
  
 When Nature conquers, art must then give way. 
Author: Friedrich von Schiller
Nationality: German
b. 10 November 1759  - d. 09 May 1805
  
 When power leads man toward arrogance, poetry reminds him of his limitations. When power narrows the areas of man's concern, poetry reminds him of the richness and diversity of his existence. When power corrupts, poetry cleanses, for art establishes the basic human truths which must serve as the touchstone of our judgement. 
Author: John F. Kennedy
Nationality: American
b. 29 May 1917  - d. 22 November 1963
  
 When science, art, literature, and philosophy are simply the manifestation of personality they are on a level where glorious and dazzling achievements are possible, which can make a man's name live for thousands of years. But above this level, far above, separated by an abyss, is the level where the highest things are achieved. These things are essentially anonymous. 
Author: Simone Weil
Nationality: French
b. 3 February 1909  - d. 24 August 1943
  
 When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome. 
Author: Miguel de Cervantes
Nationality: Spanish
b. 29 September 1547  - d. 23 April 1616
  
 When we are young, friends are, like everything else, a matter of course. In the old days we know what it means to have them. 
Author: Edward Hagerup Grieg
Nationality: Norwegian
b. 15 June 1843  - d. 04 September 1907
  
 Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 With curious art the brain, too finely wrought, Preys on herself, and is destroyed by thought. 
Author: Charles Churchill
Nationality: English
b. February 1731  - d. 4 November 1764
  
 Without art, the crudeness of reality would make the world unbearable. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 Without freedom, no art; art lives only on the restraints it imposes on itself, and dies of all others. 
Author: Albert Camus
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1913  - d. 4 January 1960
  
 Without philosophy man cannot know what he makes; without religion he cannot know why. 
Author: Eric Gill
Nationality: British
b. 22 February 1882  - d. 17 November 1940
  
 Words may be false and full of art, Sighs are the natural language of the heart. 
Author: Thomas Shadwell
Nationality: English
b. December 1642  - d.  December 1692
  
 Work! labor the asparagus me of life; the one great sacrament of humanity from which all other things flow - security, leisure, joy, art, literature, even divinity itself. 
Author: Sean O'Casey
Nationality: Irish
b. 30 March 1880  - d. 18 September 1964
  
 Works done least rapidly, art most cherishes. 
Author: Robert Browning
Nationality: English
b. 7 May 1812  - d. 12 December 1889
  
 Works of art, in my opinion, are the only objects in the material universe to possess internal order, and that is why, though I don't believe that only art matters, I do believe in Art for Art's sake. 
Author: Edward M. Forster
Nationality: English
b. 1 January 1879  - d. 7 June 1970
  
 Writing is a craft not an art. 
Author: William Zinsser
Nationality: American
b. 7 October 1922
  
 Writing ought either to be the manufacture of stories for which there is a market demand - a business as safe and commendable as making soap or breakfast foods - or it should be an art, which is always a search for something for which there is no market demand, something new and untried, where the values are intrinsic and have nothing to do with standardized values. 
Author: Willa Silbert Cather
Nationality: American
b. December 1876  - d.  December 1947
  
 You may tell a man thou art a fiend, but not your nose wants blowing; to him alone who can bear a thing of that kind, you may tell all.He who has no taste for order, will be often wrong in his judgment, and seldom considerate or conscientious in his actions. 
Author: Johann Kaspar Lavater
Nationality: Swiss
b. 15 November 1741  - d. 2 January 1801
  
 You must not fight too often with one enemy, or you will teach him all your art of war. 
Author: Napoleon Bonaparte
Nationality: French
b. 15 August 1769  - d. 5 May 1821
  
 You need more fact in the dangerous art of giving presents than in any other social action. 
Author: Ashanti Proverb
Nationality: French   
 The art of writing books is not yet invented. But it is at the point of being invented. Fragments of this nature are literary seeds. There may be many an infertile grain among them: nevertheless, if only some come up! 
Author: Novalis
Nationality: German
b. 02 May 1772  - d. 25 March 1801
  
 Neither of my parents ever stopped encouraging my brother and me from pursuing our creativity. They let us take all kinds of art classes.  
Author: Lynn Johnston
Nationality: Canadian
b. 28 May 1947
  
 The art of doing mathematics consists in finding that special case which contains all the germs of generality. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 The Art Snob can be recognized in the home by the quick look he gives the pictures on your walls, quick but penetrating, as though he were undressing them. This is followed either by complete and pained silence or a comment such as "That's really a very pleasant little water color you have there. 
Author: Russell Lynes
Nationality: American
b. December 1910  - d.  December 1991
  
 The art of measurement, by showing us the truth would have brought our soul into the repose of abiding by the truth, and so would have saved our life. 
Author: Protagoras
Nationality: Greek
b. December 481  - d.  December 420
  
 Beauty in art is often nothing but ugliness subdued.  
Author: Jean Rostand
Nationality: French
b. 30 October 1894  - d. 04 September 1977
  
 Good humor isn't a trait of character, it is an art which requires practice. 
Author: David Seabury
Nationality: American   
 Ads are the cave art of the twentieth century. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 Advertising is the greatest art form of the 20th century. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 Art is anything you can get away with. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 Art at its most significant is a Distant Early Warning System that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen to it. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 Experiment is necessary in establishing an academy, but certain principles must apply to this business of art as to any other business which affects the artistic tic sense of the community. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 Great art speaks a language which every intelligent person can understand. The people who call themselves modernists today speak a different language. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 I think of art, at its most significant, as a DEW line, a Distant Early Warning system that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen to it. 
Author: Marshall McLuhan
Nationality: Canadian
b. 21 July 1911  - d. 31 December 1980
  
 In most modern instances, interpretation amounts to the philistine refusal to leave the work of art alone. Real art has the capacity to make us nervous. By reducing the work of art to its content and then interpreting that, one tames the work of art. Interpretation makes art manageable, conformable. 
Author: Susan Sontag
Nationality: American
b. 16 January 1933  - d. 28 December 2004
  
 Interpretation is the revenge of the intellectual upon art. 
Author: Susan Sontag
Nationality: American
b. 16 January 1933  - d. 28 December 2004
  
 The aim of all commentary on art now should be to make works of art - and, by analogy, our own experience - more, rather than less, real to us. The function of criticism should be to show how it is what it is, even that it is what it is, rather than to show what it means. 
Author: Susan Sontag
Nationality: American
b. 16 January 1933  - d. 28 December 2004
  
 Unfortunately, moral beauty in art - like physical beauty in a person - is extremely perishable. It is nowhere so durable as artistic or intellectual beauty. Moral beauty has a tendency to decay very rapidly into sententiousness or untimeliness. 
Author: Susan Sontag
Nationality: American
b. 16 January 1933  - d. 28 December 2004
  
 Art is a private thing, the artist makes it for himself; a comprehensible work is the product of a journalist. We need works that are strong, straight, precise, and forever beyond understanding. 
Author: Kenneth Peacock Tynan
Nationality: English
b. December 1927  - d.  December 1980
  
 The buttocks are the most aesthetically pleasing part of the body because they are non-functional. Although they conceal an essential orifice, these pointless globes are as near as the human form can ever come to abstract art. 
Author: Kenneth Peacock Tynan
Nationality: English
b. December 1927  - d.  December 1980
  
 Art is on the side of the oppressed. Think before you shudder at the simplistic dictum and its heretical definition of the freedom of art. For if art is freedom of the spirit, how can it exist within the oppressors? 
Author: Edith Wharton
Nationality: American
b. 24 January 1862  - d. 11 August 1937
  
 Besides the noble art of getting things done, there is the noble art of leaving things undone. The wisdom of life consists in the elimination of non-essentials. 
Author: Lin Yutang
Nationality: Chinese
b. 10 October 1895  - d. 26 March 1976
  
 Many artists and scholars have pointed out that ultimately art depends on human nature. 
Author: Steven Pinker
Nationality: Canadian
b. 18 September 1954
  
 Art works because it appeals to certain faculties of the mind. Music depends on details of the auditory system, painting and sculpture on the visual system. Poetry and literature depend on language. 
Author: Steven Pinker
Nationality: Canadian
b. 18 September 1954
  
 Writing stopped being fun when I discovered the difference between good writing and bad and, even more terrifying, the difference between it and true art. And after that, the whip came down. 
Author: Truman Capote
Nationality: American
b. 30 September 1924  - d. 25 October 1984
  
 Writing is a kind of performing art, and I can't sit down to write unless I'm dressed. I don't mean dressed in a suit, but dressed well and comfortably and I have to be shaved and bathed. 
Author: Peter O'toole
Nationality: Irish
b. 2 August 1932
  
 Great art is the expression of a solution of the conflict between the demands of the world without and that within. 
Author: Edith Hamilton
Nationality: American
b. December 1867  - d.  December 1963
  
 I am still a victim of chess. It has all the beauty of art - and much more. It cannot be commercialized. Chess is much purer than art in its social position. 
Author: Marcel Duchamp
Nationality: American
b. 28 July 1887  - d. 02 October 1968
  
 I have forced myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own taste. 
Author: Marcel Duchamp
Nationality: American
b. 28 July 1887  - d. 02 October 1968
  
 The chess pieces are the block alphabet which shapes thoughts; and these thoughts, although making a visual design on the chess-board, express their beauty abstractly, like a poem... I have come to the personal conclusion that while all artists are not chess players, all chess players are artists. 
Author: Marcel Duchamp
Nationality: American
b. 28 July 1887  - d. 02 October 1968
  
 The individual, man as a man, man as a brain, if you like, interests me more than what he makes, because I've noticed that most artists only repeat themselves. 
Author: Marcel Duchamp
Nationality: American
b. 28 July 1887  - d. 02 October 1968
  
 Here society is reduced to its original elements, the whole fabric of art and conventionality is struck rudely to pieces, and men find themselves suddenly brought back to the wants and resources of their original natures. 
Author: Francis Parkman
Nationality: American
b. 16 September 1823  - d. 08 November 1893
  
 Art! Who comprehends her? With whom can one consult concerning this great goddess? 
Author: Ludwig van Beethoven
Nationality: German
b. 16 December 1770  - d. 26 March 1827
  
 Democracy is the art of thinking independently together.  
Author: Alexander Meiklejohn
Nationality: English
b. 01 February 1872  - d. 17 December 1964
  
 Love and business and family and religion and art and patriotism are nothing but shadows of words when a man's starving! 
Author: O. Henry
Nationality: American
b. December 1862  - d.  December 1910
  
 When one loves one's art, no service seems too hard. 
Author: O. Henry
Nationality: American
b. December 1862  - d.  December 1910
  
 The perfection of art is to conceal art. 
Author: Marcus Fabius Quintillian
Nationality: Roman
b. December 35  - d.  December 100
  
 The writer interweaves a story with his own doubts, questions, and values. That is art. 
Author: Naguib Mahfouz
Nationality: Egyptian
b. 11 December 1911  - d. 30 August 2006
  
 My trade and art is to live. 
Author: Michel de Montaigne
Nationality: French
b. 28 February 1533  - d. 13 September 1592
  
 Confound the nose, there's no end to it! 
Author: Thomas Gainsborough
Nationality: English
b. December 1727  - d.  December 1788
  
 In general it can be said that a nation's art is greatest when it most reflects the character of its people. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 In its most limited sense, modern, art would seem to concern itself only with the technical innovations of the period. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 It is true that the Impressionists perhaps gave a more faithful representation of nature through their discoveries in out-of-door painting. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 It's to paint directly on the canvas without any funny business, as it were, and I use almost pure turpentine to start with, adding oil as I go along until the medium becomes pure oil. I use as little oil as I can possibly help, and that's my method. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 One of the weaknesses of much abstract painting is the attempt to substitute the inventions of the intellect for a pristine imaginative conception. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 Maybe I am not very human - what I wanted to do was to paint sunlight on the side of a house. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 More of me comes out when I improvise. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 My aim in painting has always been the most exact transcription possible of my most intimate impression of nature. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 After all, we are not French and never can be, and any attempt to be so is to deny our inheritance and to try to impose upon ourselves a character that can be nothing but a veneer upon the surface. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I find linseed oil and white lead the most satisfactory mediums. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I believe that the great painters with their intellect as master have attempted to force this unwilling medium of paint and canvas into a record of their emotions. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I find in working always the disturbing intrusion of elements not a part of my most interested vision, and the inevitable obliteration and replacement of this vision by the work itself as it proceeds. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I have tried to present my sensations in what is the most congenial and impressive form possible to me. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I never use a final varnish. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I think that zinc white has a property of scaling and cracking. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I trust Winsor and Newton and I paint directly upon it. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 I use a retouching varnish which is made in France, Libert, and that's all the varnish I use. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 If I had the energy, I would have done it all over the county. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 If the picture needs varnishing later, I allow a restorer to do that, if there's any restoring necessary. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 If the technical innovations of the Impressionists led merely to a more accurate representation of nature, it was perhaps of not much value in enlarging their powers of expression. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 Painting will have to deal more fully and less obliquely with life and nature's phenomena before it can again become great. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 The only real influence I've ever had was myself. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 The question of the value of nationality in art is perhaps unsolvable. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 The Romans were not an aesthetically sensitive people, nor did Greece's intellectual domination over them destroy their racial character, but who is to say that they might not have produced a more original and vital art without this domination. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 Yes, linseed oil. I used to use poppy oil, but I have heard that poppy oil is given to cracking pigment too, so I use it no longer. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 The trend in some of the contemporary movements in art, but by no means all, seems to deny this ideal and to me appears to lead to a purely decorative conception of painting. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 There will be, I think, an attempt to grasp again the surprise and accidents of nature and a more intimate and sympathetic study of its moods, together with a renewed wonder and humility on the part of such as are still capable of these basic reactions. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 There is a sort of elation about sunlight on the upper part of a house. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 This direction is sterile and without hope to those who wish to give painting a richer and more human meaning and a wider scope. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 Well, I have a very simple method of painting. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 Well, I've always been interested in approaching a big city in a train, and I can't exactly describe the sensations, but they're entirely human and perhaps have nothing to do with aesthetics. 
Author: Edward Hopper
Nationality: American
b. 22 July 1882  - d. 15 May 1967
  
 There is a deep question whether the possible meanings that emerge from an effort to explain the experience of art may not mask the real meanings of a work of art. 
Author: Jerome Seymour Bruner
Nationality: American
b. 01 October 1915
  
 Like art and politics, gangsterism is a very important avenue of assimilation into society. 
Author: Edward Lawrence Doctorow
Nationality: American
b. December 1931
  
 Art must not serve might. 
Author: Dr. Karel Capek
Nationality: Czechoslovakian
b. 9 January 1890  - d. 25 December 1938
  
 I've got a peculiar weakness for criminals and artists-neither takes life as it is. Any tragic story has to be in conflict with things as they are. 
Author: Stanley Kubrick
Nationality: American
b. 26 July 1928  - d. 07 March 1999
  
 If you can talk brilliantly about a problem, it can create the consoling illusion that it has been mastered. 
Author: Stanley Kubrick
Nationality: American
b. 26 July 1928  - d. 07 March 1999
  
 Perhaps it sounds ridiculous, but the best thing that young filmmakers should do is to get hold of a camera and some film and make a movie of any kind at all. 
Author: Stanley Kubrick
Nationality: American
b. 26 July 1928  - d. 07 March 1999
  
 The screen is a magic medium. It has such power that it can retain interest as it conveys emotions and moods that no other art form can hope to tackle. 
Author: Stanley Kubrick
Nationality: American
b. 26 July 1928  - d. 07 March 1999
  
 You sit at the board and suddenly your heart leaps. Your hand trembles to pick up the piece and move it. But what chess teaches you is that you must sit there calmly and think about whether it's really a good idea and whether there are other, better ideas. 
Author: Stanley Kubrick
Nationality: American
b. 26 July 1928  - d. 07 March 1999
  
 Death is an endless night so awful to contemplate that it can make us love life and value it with such passion that it may be the ultimate cause of all joy and all art. 
Author: Paul Theroux
Nationality: American
b. 10 April 1941
  
 Art is like baby shoes. When you coat them with gold, they can no longer be worn. 
Author: John Updike
Nationality: American
b. 18 March 1932  - d. 27 January 2009
  
 What art offers is space - a certain breathing room for the spirit. 
Author: John Updike
Nationality: American
b. 18 March 1932  - d. 27 January 2009
  
 Politics is the art of preventing people from taking part in affairs which properly concern them. 
Author: Paul Valéry
Nationality: French
b. 30 October 1871  - d. 20 July 1945
  
 Art distills sensation and embodies it with enhanced meaning in a memorable form - or else it is not art. 
Author: Jacques Martin Barzun
Nationality: American
b. 30 November 1907
  
 Not even the visionary or mystical experience ever lasts very long. It is for art to capture that experience, to offer it to, in the case of literature, its readers; to be, for a secular, materialist culture, some sort of replacement for what the love of god offers in the world of faith. 
Author: Jacques Martin Barzun
Nationality: American
b. 30 November 1907
  
 Teaching is not a lost art, but the regard for it is a lost tradition. 
Author: Jacques Martin Barzun
Nationality: American
b. 30 November 1907
  
 I have nothing to hide in art. The initial force alone can bring anyone to the end he must attain. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 A work of art which did not begin in emotion is not art. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 An art which isn't based on feeling isn't an art at all. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 Art is a harmony parallel with nature. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 Don't be an art critic. Paint. There lies salvation. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 I am more a friend of art than a producer of painting. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 Is art really the priesthood that demands the pure in heart who belong to it wholly? 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 My age and health will never allow me to realize the dream of art I've been pursuing all my life. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 The most seductive thing about art is the personality of the artist himself. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 Unfortunately the advanced age I've now reached makes the approach to new formulas of art hard for me. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 When I judge art, I take my painting and put it next to a God made object like a tree or flower. If it clashes, it is not art. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 You say a new era in art is preparing; you sensed it coming; continue your studies without weakening. God will do the rest. 
Author: Paul Cezanne
Nationality: French
b. 19 January 1839  - d. 22 October 1906
  
 Art is never finished, only abandoned. 
Author: Leonardo da Vinci
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 April 1452  - d. 02 May 1519
  
 The human foot is a masterpiece of engineering and a work of art. 
Author: Leonardo da Vinci
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 April 1452  - d. 02 May 1519
  
 Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art. 
Author: Leonardo da Vinci
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 April 1452  - d. 02 May 1519
  
 Shooting paintballs is not an art form. 
T.V. Series: The Simpsons
Nationality: American   
 An art book is a museum without walls. 
Author: Andre Malraux
Nationality: French
b. 3 November 1901  - d. 23 November 1976
  
 Art has a double face, of expression and illusion, just like science has a double face: the reality of error and the phantom of truth.  
Author: Publilius Syrus
Nationality: Syrian
b. December 85  - d.  December 43
  
 Art can only be truly art by presenting an adequate outward symbol of some fact in the interior life.Be what you would seem to be - or, if you'd like it put more simply - a house is no home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.  
Author: Margaret Fuller
Nationality: American
b. 23 May 1810  - d. 19 June 1850
  
 Nature is the art of God. 
Author: Dante Alighieri
Nationality: Italian
b. 14 May 1265  - d. 13 September 1321
  
 Every mind which has given itself to self-expression in art is aware of a directing agency outside its conscious control which it has agreed to label 'inspiration'. 
Author: Norman Lindsay
Nationality: Australian
b. 22 February 1879  - d. 21 November 1969
  
 Indeed the three prophecies about the death of individual art are, in their different ways, those of Hegel, Marx, and Freud. I don't see any way of getting beyond those prophecies. 
Author: Harold Bloom
Nationality: American
b. 11 July 1930
  
 The passions are the most effective orators for persuading. They are a natural art that have infallible rules; and the simplest man with passion will be more persuasive than the most eloquent without it 
Author: François de La Rochefoucauld
Nationality: French
b. 15 September 1613  - d. 17 March 1680
  
 A guilty conscience needs to confess. A work of art is a confession. 
Author: Albert Camus
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1913  - d. 4 January 1960
  
 A man's work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened. 
Author: Albert Camus
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1913  - d. 4 January 1960
  
 Abstract Art: A product of the untalented, sold by the unprincipled to the utterly bewildered. 
Author: Albert Camus
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1913  - d. 4 January 1960
  
 Truly fertile music, the only kind that will move us, that we shall truly appreciate, will be a music conducive to dream, which banishes all reason and analysis. One must not wish first to understand and then to feel. Art does not tolerate reason. 
Author: Albert Camus
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1913  - d. 4 January 1960
  
 It is commonly supposed that the art of pleasing is a wonderful aid in the pursuit of fortune; but the art of being bored is infinitely more successful. 
Author: Nicolas Chamfort
Nationality: French
b. 6 April 1741  - d. 13 April 1794
  
 The art of the parenthesis is one of the greatest secrets of eloquence in Society. 
Author: Nicolas Chamfort
Nationality: French
b. 6 April 1741  - d. 13 April 1794
  
 Great art is the contempt of a great man for small art. 
Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald
Nationality: American
b. 24 September 1896  - d. 21 December 1940
  
 Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed. 
Author: Khalil Gibran
Nationality: American
b. 6 January 1883  - d. 10 April 1931
  
 It is the function of art to renew our perception. What we are familiar with we cease to see. The writer shakes up the familiar scene, and, as if by magic, we see a new meaning in it. 
Author: Anais Nin
Nationality: American
b. 21 February 1903  - d. 14 January 1977
  
 A Bachelor of Arts is one who makes love to a lot of women, and yet has the art to remain a bachelor. 
Author: Helen Rowland
Nationality: American
b. December 1875  - d.  December 1950
  
 Flirting is the gentle art of making a man feel pleased with himself. 
Author: Helen Rowland
Nationality: American
b. December 1875  - d.  December 1950
  
 Telling lies is a fault in a boy, an art in a lover, an accomplishment in a bachelor, and second-nature in a married man. 
Author: Helen Rowland
Nationality: American
b. December 1875  - d.  December 1950
  
 A nation devoid of art and artists cannot have a full existence. 
Author: Mustafa Kemal Atatürk
Nationality: Turkish
b. December 1881  - d. 10 November 1938
  
 It is my hope that my son, when I am gone, will remember me not from the battle but in the home repeating with him our simple daily prayer, 'Our Father who art in heaven. 
Author: Douglas MacArthur
Nationality: American
b. 26 January 1880  - d. 5 April 1964
  
 It is a great art to saunter. 
Author: Henry David Thoreau
Nationality: American
b. 12 July 1817  - d. 6 May 1862
  
 If we learn the art of yielding what must be yielded to the changing present, we can save the best of the past. 
Author: Dean Acheson
Nationality: American
b. 11 April 1893  - d. 12 October 1971
  
 Let us be true: this is the highest maxim of art and of life, the secret of eloquence and of virtue, and of all moral Literatureity. 
Author: Henri-Frédéric Amiel
Nationality: Swiss
b. 27 September 1821  - d. 11 May 1881
  
 The art of living is more like wrestling than dancing. 
Author: Laozi
Nationality: Chinese
b. December 604  - d.  December 531
  
 Photography is more than a medium for factual communication of ideas. It is a creative art. 
Author: Ansel Adams
Nationality: American
b. 20 February 1902  - d. 22 April 1984
  
 There are worlds of experience beyond the world of the aggressive man, beyond history, and beyond science. The moods and qualities of nature and the revelations of great art are equally difficult to define; we can grasp them only in the depths of our perceptive spirit. 
Author: Ansel Adams
Nationality: American
b. 20 February 1902  - d. 22 April 1984
  
 When thou art above measure angry, bethink thee how momentary is man's life. 
Author: Marcus Aurelius
Nationality: Roman
b. 26 April 121  - d. 17 March 180
  
 Simplicity is natures first step, and the last of art. 
Author: Philip James Bailey
Nationality: English
b. 22 April 1816  - d. 6 September 1902
  
 Science is what we understand well enough to explain to a computer. Art is everything else we do. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 In a few days I myself knew that I should some day become an architect. To be sure, it was an incredibly hard road; for the studies I had neglected out of spite at the Realschule were sorely needed. One could not attend the Academy's architectural school without having attended the building school at the Technic, and the latter required a high-school degree. I had none of all this. The fulfillment of my artistic dream seemed physically impossible. 
Author: Adolf Hitler
Nationality: German
b. 20 April 1889  - d. 30 April 1945
  
 Anyone who sees and paints a sky green and fields blue ought to be sterilized. 
Author: Adolf Hitler
Nationality: German
b. 20 April 1889  - d. 30 April 1945
  
 The art of acting consists in keeping people from coughing. 
Author: Benjamin Franklin
Nationality: American
b. 17 January 1706  - d. 17 April 1790
  
 The art of pleasing is the art of deception. 
Author: Marquis de Vauvenargues Luc de Clapiers
Nationality: French
b. 6 August 1715  - d. 28 May 1747
  
 Patience is the art of hoping. 
Author: Marquis de Vauvenargues Luc de Clapiers
Nationality: French
b. 6 August 1715  - d. 28 May 1747
  
 Art depends on luck and talent. 
Author: Francis Ford Coppola
Nationality: American
b. 7 April 1939
  
 Although all the good arts serve to draw man's mind away from vices and lead it toward better things, this function can be more fully performed by this art, which also provides extraordinary intellectual pleasure.  
Author: Nicholaus Copernicus
Nationality: Prussian
b. 19 February 1473  - d. 24 May 1543
  
 Art begins in imitation and ends in innovation. 
Author: Mason Cooley
Nationality: American
b. December 1927  - d. 25 July 2002
  
 Art seduces, but does not exploit. 
Author: Mason Cooley
Nationality: American
b. December 1927  - d. 25 July 2002
  
 If you are going to break a Law of Art, make the crime interesting. 
Author: Mason Cooley
Nationality: American
b. December 1927  - d. 25 July 2002
  
 Lying just for the fun of it is either art or pathology. 
Author: Mason Cooley
Nationality: American
b. December 1927  - d. 25 July 2002
  
 People believe that photographs are true and therefore cannot be art. 
Author: Mason Cooley
Nationality: American
b. December 1927  - d. 25 July 2002
  
 For the last two years I have been running after pictures, and seeking the truth at second hand. I have not endeavoured to represent nature with the same elevation of mind with which I set out, but have rather tried to make my performances look like the work of other men. There is room enough for a natural painter. The great vice of the present day is bravura, an attempt to do something beyond the truth. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Hourly do I feel the loss of my departed Angel - God only knows how my children will be brought up. The face of the World is totally changed to me. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I have a production company and projects I would like to do. I mostly lately have done these European art things that nobody sees. 
Author: John Malkovich
Nationality: American
b. 9 December 1953
  
 The enemy of art is the absence of limitations.  
Author: Orson Welles
Nationality: American
b. 6 May 1915  - d. 10 October 1985
  
 Most works of art, like most wines, ought to be consumed in the district of their fabrication. 
Author: Simone Weil
Nationality: French
b. 3 February 1909  - d. 24 August 1943
  
 To want friendship is a great fault. Friendship ought to be a gratuitous joy, like the joys afforded by art or life. 
Author: Simone Weil
Nationality: French
b. 3 February 1909  - d. 24 August 1943
  
 The challenge is to practice politics as the art of making what appears to be impossible, possible. 
Author: Hilary Clinton
Nationality: American
b. 26 October 1947
  
 I'm very manipulative towards directors. My theory is that everyone on the set is directing the film, we're all receiving art messages from the universe on how we should do the film. 
Author: Jeff Bridges
Nationality: American
b. 4 December 1949
  
 Fashion is only the attempt to realize art in living forms and social intercourse. 
Author: Francis Bacon
Nationality: English
b. 22 January 1561  - d. 9 April 1626
  
 The momentous thing in human life is the art of winning the soul to good or evil. 
Author: Francis Bacon
Nationality: English
b. 22 January 1561  - d. 9 April 1626
  
 Facts can be turned into art if one is artful enough. 
Author: Paul Simon
Nationality: American
b. 13 October 1941
  
 I would be willing to do almost anything to make Art happy. I care about our friendship. The only thing I won't do is change the essence of my work. 
Author: Paul Simon
Nationality: American
b. 13 October 1941
  
 I am a great lover of art, in many forms: paintings, objets, textiles. I don't have the talent for painting, but I have a very good sense of colour, a love of visual beauty. 
Author: Jacqueline Bisset
Nationality: English
b. 13 September 1944
  
 Medicine is a science of uncertainty and an art of probability. 
Author: William Osler
Nationality: Canadian
b. 12 July 1849  - d. 29 December 1919
  
 There is no more difficult art to acquire than the art of observation, and for some men it is quite as difficult to record an observation in brief and plain language.  
Author: William Osler
Nationality: Canadian
b. 12 July 1849  - d. 29 December 1919
  
 All humanity is passion; without passion, religion, history, novels, art would be ineffectual. 
Author: Honoré de Balzac
Nationality: French
b. 20 May 1799  - d. 18 August 1850
  
 The art of motherhood involves much silent, unobtrusive self-denial, an hourly devotion which finds no detail too minute. 
Author: Honoré de Balzac
Nationality: French
b. 20 May 1799  - d. 18 August 1850
  
 In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy's country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good. 
Author: Sun Tzu
Nationality: Chinese
b. December 544  - d.  December 496
  
 The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. 
Author: Sun Tzu
Nationality: Chinese
b. December 544  - d.  December 496
  
 Art is always and everywhere the secret confession, and at the same time the immortal movement of its time. 
Author: Karl Marx
Nationality: German
b. 5 May 1818  - d. 14 March 1883
  
 Life is the only art that we are required to practice without preparation, and without being allowed the preliminary trials, the failures and botches, that are essential for training. 
Author: Lewis Mumford
Nationality: American
b. 19 October 1895  - d. 26 January 1990
  
 The chief function of the city is to convert power into form, energy into culture, dead matter into the living symbols of art, biological reproduction into social creativity. 
Author: Lewis Mumford
Nationality: American
b. 19 October 1895  - d. 26 January 1990
  
 In every work of art the subject is primordial, whether the artist knows it or not. The measure of the formal qualities is only a sign of the measure of the artist's obsession with his subject; the form is always in proportion to the obsession. 
Author: Alberto Giacometti
Nationality: Swiss
b. 10 October 1901  - d. 11 January 1966
  
 When you look at art made by other people, you see what you need to see in it. 
Author: Alberto Giacometti
Nationality: Swiss
b. 10 October 1901  - d. 11 January 1966
  
 Sculpture is the art of the hole and the lump 
Author: Auguste Rodin
Nationality: French
b. 12 November 1840  - d. 17 November 1917
  
 Chance gives rise to thoughts, and chance removes them; no art can keep or acquire them. 
Author: Blaise Pascal
Nationality: French
b. 19 June 1623  - d. 19 August 1662
  
 There are people who believe everything is sane and sensible that is done with a solemn face. It is no great art to say something briefly when, like Tacitus, one has something to say; when one has nothing to say, however, and none the less writes a whole book and makes truth - into a liar - that I call an achievement. 
Author: Georg Cristoph Lichtenberg
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1742  - d. 24 February 1799
  
 Blest is that government where no art thrives. 
Author: Thomas Nashe
Nationality: English
b. December 1567  - d.  December 1601
  
 Great success, great profit, great performances, etc. etc. ... France is becoming more and more philistine towards music, and the more I see of foreign lands the less I love my own. Art, in France, is dead; so I must go where it is still to be found. In England apparently there has been a real revolution in the musical consciousness of the nation in the last ten years. We shall see. 
Author: Hector Berlioz
Nationality: French
b. 11 December 1803  - d. 8 March 1869
  
 I am a poor man and of little worth, who is laboring in that art that God has given me in order to extend my life as long as possible. 
Author: Michelangelo
Nationality: Italian
b. 6 March 1475  - d. 18 February 1564
  
 Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time. 
Author: Thomas Merton
Nationality: American
b. 31 January 1915  - d. 10 December 1968
  
 Errors are not in the art but in the artificers. 
Author: Isaac Newton
Nationality: English
b. 4 January 1642  - d. 31 March 1727
  
 Tact is the art of making a point without making an enemy. 
Author: Isaac Newton
Nationality: English
b. 4 January 1642  - d. 31 March 1727
  
 The art of politics consists in knowing precisely when it is necessary to hit an opponent slightly below the belt. 
Author: Konrad Adenauer
Nationality: German
b. 5 January 1876  - d. 19 April 1967
  
 The capacity to be puzzled is the premise of all creation, be it in art or in science. 
Author: Erich Fromm
Nationality: American
b. 23 March 1900  - d. 18 March 1980
  
 The value and rank of every art is in proportion to the mental labor employed in it, or the mental pleasure in producing it. 
Author: Sir Joshua Reynolds
Nationality: English
b. 16 July 1723  - d. 23 February 1792
  
 Thought is a strenuous art - few practice it, and then only at rare times. 
Author: David Ben-Gurion
Nationality: Israeli
b. 16 October 1886  - d. 1 December 1973
  
 The public history of modern art is the story of conventional people not knowing what they are dealing with. 
Author: Golda Meir
Nationality: Israeli
b. 3 May 1898  - d. 8 December 1978
  
 A primary function of art and thought is to liberate the individual from the tyranny of his culture in the environmental sense and to permit him to stand beyond it in an autonomy of perception and judgment. 
Author: Beverly Sills
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1929  - d. 2 July 2007
  
 Art is the signature of civilizations. 
Author: Beverly Sills
Nationality: American
b. 25 May 1929  - d. 2 July 2007
  
 I don't need the money, dear. I work for art. 
Author: Maria Callas
Nationality: American
b. 2 December 1923  - d. 16 September 1977
  
 My goal is to be one with the music. I just dedicate my whole life to this art. 
Author: Jimi Hendrix
Nationality: African-American
b. 27 January 1942  - d. 18 September 1970
  
 It seems to me that many writers, by virtue of environments of culture, art and education, slip into writing because of their environments. 
Author: Robert E. Howard
Nationality: American
b. 22 January 1906  - d. 11 June 1936
  
 Art is not necessary at all. All that is necessary to make this world a better place to live in is to love - to love as Christ loved, as Buddha loved. 
Author: Isadora Duncan
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1878  - d. 14 September 1927
  
 It has taken me years of struggle, hard work and research to learn to make one simple gesture, and I know enough about the art of writing to realize that it would take as many years of concentrated effort to write one simple, beautiful sentence. 
Author: Isadora Duncan
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1878  - d. 14 September 1927
  
 A copy of the universe is not what is required of art; one of the damned things is ample. 
Author: Rebecca West
Nationality: Irish
b. 21 December 1892  - d. 15 March 1983
  
 Any authentic work of art must start an argument between the artist and his audience. 
Author: Rebecca West
Nationality: Irish
b. 21 December 1892  - d. 15 March 1983
  
 There is no logical reason why the camel of great art should pass through the needle of mob intelligence. 
Author: Rebecca West
Nationality: Irish
b. 21 December 1892  - d. 15 March 1983
  
 Insurrection is an art, and like all arts has its own laws. 
Author: Leon Trotsky
Nationality: Russian
b. 7 November 1879  - d. 21 August 1940
  
 In France, cooking is a serious art form and a national sport. 
Author: Julia Child
Nationality: American
b. 15 August 1912  - d. 13 August 2004
  
 Nothing retains less of desire in art, in science, than this will to industry, booty, possession. 
Author: André Breton
Nationality: French
b. 19 February 1896  - d. 28 September 1966
  
 I'd like to introduce someone who has just come into my life. I've admired him for 35 years. He's someone who represents integrity, honesty, art, and on top of that stuff I'm actually sleeping with him. 
Author: Shirley MacLaine
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1934
  
 The only kind of work which permits an able woman to realize her abilities fully, to achieve identity in society in a life plan that can encompass marriage and motherhood, is the kind that was forbidden by the feminine mystique, the lifelong commitment to an art or science, to politics or profession. If divorce has increased by one thousand percent, don't blame the women's movement. Blame the obsolete sex roles on which our marriages were based. 
Author: Betty Friedan
Nationality: American
b. 4 February 1921  - d. 4 February 2006
  
 Rules and models destroy genius and art. 
Author: William Hazlitt
Nationality: English
b. 10 April 1778  - d. 18 September 1830
  
 The rule in the art world is: you cater to the masses or you kowtow to the elite; you can't have both. 
Author: Ben Hecht
Nationality: American
b. 28 February 1894  - d. 18 April 1964
  
 Custom, that is before all law; Nature, that is above all art. 
Author: Samuel Daniel
Nationality: English
b. December 1562  - d. 14 October 1619
  
 A frenzied passion for art is a canker that devours everything else. 
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 Evil is committed without effort, naturally, fatally; goodness is always the product of some art. 
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 It is from the womb of art that criticism was born.  
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 Modernity is the transient, the fleeting, the contingent; it is one half of art, the other being the eternal and the immovable. 
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 What is art? Prostitution. 
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 To say the word Romanticism is to say modern art - that is, intimacy, spirituality, color, aspiration towards the infinite, expressed by every means available to the arts. 
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 Who would dare assign to art the sterile function of imitating nature? 
Author: Charles Pierre Baudelaire
Nationality: French
b. 9 April 1821  - d. 21 August 1867
  
 Art is accusation, expression, passion. Art is a fight to the finish between black charcoal and white paper. 
Author: Günter Wilhelm Grass
Nationality: German
b. 16 October 1927
  
 And if the Wine you drink, the Lip you press, End in the Nothing all Things end in - Yes - Then fancy while Thou art, Thou art but what Thou shalt be - Nothing - Thou shalt not be less. 
Author: Omar Khayyam
Nationality: Persian
b. 18 May 1048  - d. 4 December 1123
  
 Design in art, is a recognition of the relation between various things, various elements in the creative flux. You can't invent a design. You recognize it, in the fourth dimension. That is, with your blood and your bones, as well as with your eyes. 
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 2 March 1930
  
 I can't bear art that you can walk round and admire. A book should be either a bandit or a rebel or a man in the crowd. 
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 2 March 1930
  
 Oh literature, oh the glorious Art, how it preys upon the marrow in our bones. It scoops the stuffing out of us, and chucks us aside. Alas!  
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 2 March 1930
  
 The business of art is to reveal the relation between man and his environment. 
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 2 March 1930
  
 Since obscenity is the truth of our passion today, it is the only stuff of art - or almost the only stuff. 
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 2 March 1930
  
 The essential function of art is moral. But a passionate, implicit morality, not didactic. A morality which changes the blood, rather than the mind. 
Author: D. H. Lawrence
Nationality: English
b. 11 September 1885  - d. 2 March 1930
  
 Art and money are closely related. Try sitting down with a group of artists and ask them what's on their mind. Very quickly the topic shifts to money. And it can be very hard to get them off that subject.  
Author: Dave Winer
Nationality: American
b. 2 May 1955
  
 The web of life is a beautiful and meaningless dance. The web of life is a process with a moving goal. The web of life is a perfectly finished work of art right where I am sitting now. 
Author: Robert Anton Wilson
Nationality: American
b. 18 January 1932
  
 Writing is truly a creative art - putting word to a blank piece of paper and ending up with a full-fledged story rife with character and plot. 
Author: William Shatner
Nationality: Canadian
b. 22 March 1931
  
 A portrait is a painting with something wrong with the mouth. 
Author: John Singer Sargent
Nationality: American
b. 12 January 1856  - d. 14 April 1925
  
 I do not judge, I only chronicle. 
Author: John Singer Sargent
Nationality: American
b. 12 January 1856  - d. 14 April 1925
  
 Mine is the horny hand of toil. 
Author: John Singer Sargent
Nationality: American
b. 12 January 1856  - d. 14 April 1925
  
 You can't do sketches enough. Sketch everything and keep your curiosity fresh. 
Author: John Singer Sargent
Nationality: American
b. 12 January 1856  - d. 14 April 1925
  
 Oh do not die, for I shall hate All women so, when thou art gone. 
Author: John Donne
Nationality: English
b. 23 January 1572  - d. 31 March 1631
  
 For I am every dead thing, In whom love wrought new alchemy. For his art did express A quintessence even from nothingness, From dull privations, and lean emptiness He ruined me, and I am re-begot Of absence, darkness, death; things which are not. 
Author: John Donne
Nationality: English
b. 23 January 1572  - d. 31 March 1631
  
 Infatuated, half through conceit, half through love of my art, I achieve the impossible working as no one else ever works. 
Author: Alexandre Dumas
Nationality: French
b. 24 July 1803  - d. 5 December 1870
  
 Art requires neither complaisance nor politeness; nothing but faith, faith and freedom. 
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 Of all lies, art is the least untrue.  
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 The art of writing is the art of discovering what you believe. 
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 The cult of art gives pride; one never has too much of it. 
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 The only way to avoid being unhappy is to close yourself up in Art and to count for nothing all the rest. 
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 There are neither good nor bad subjects. From the point of view of pure Art, you could almost establish it as an axiom that the subject is irrelevant, style itself being an absolute manner of seeing things. 
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 You can calculate the worth of a man by the number of his enemies, and the importance of a work of art by the harm that is spoken of it. 
Author: Gustave Flaubert
Nationality: French
b. 12 December 1821  - d. 8 May 1880
  
 Politics is the art of the possible. 
Author: Prince Otto von Bismarck
Nationality: German
b. 1 April 1815  - d. 30 July 1898
  
 Disco deserved a better name, a beautiful name because it was a beautiful art form. It made the consumer beautiful. The consumer was the star. 
Author: Barry White
Nationality: American
b. 12 September 1944  - d. 4 July 2003
  
 If Antarctica were music it would be Mozart. Art, and it would be Michelangelo. Literature, and it would be Shakespeare. And yet it is something even greater; the only place on earth that is still as it should be. May we never tame it. 
Author: Andrew Denton
Nationality: American
b. 4 May 1960
  
 I said, when will your kind heart Thoughts of friendship start? Said, speak not of this art Until it's time for that trend. 
Author: Hafez
Nationality: Persian
b. December 1315  - d.  December 1390
  
 The art of losing isn't hard to master; so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster. 
Author: Elizabeth Bishop
Nationality: American
b. 8 February 1911  - d. 6 October 1979
  
 You should trust any man in his own art provided he is skilled in it. 
Author: Edward Coke
Nationality: English
b. 1 February 1552  - d. 3 September 1633
  
 The art of publicity is a black art; but it has come to stay, and every year adds to its potency. 
Author: Learned Hand
Nationality: American
b. 27 January 1872  - d. 18 August 1961
  
 What life means to me is to put the content of Shelley into the form of Zola. The proletarian writer is a writer with a purpose; he thinks no more of "art for art's sake" than a man on a sinking ship thinks of painting a beautiful picture in the cabin; he thinks of getting ashore - and then there will be time enough for art. 
Author: Upton Sinclair
Nationality: American
b. 20 September 1878  - d. 25 November 1968
  
 All art is propaganda. It is universally and inescapably propaganda; sometimes unconsciously, but often deliberately, propaganda. 
Author: Upton Sinclair
Nationality: American
b. 20 September 1878  - d. 25 November 1968
  
 It is essential to do everything possible to attract young people to opera so they can see that it is not some antiquated art form but a repository of the most glorious music and drama that man has created. 
Author: Bruce Beresford
Nationality: Australian
b. 16 August 1940
  
 The number of opera houses around the world and the high attendance rates show that opera an art form that is more popular than ever. 
Author: Bruce Beresford
Nationality: Australian
b. 16 August 1940
  
 It is not hard to understand modern art. If it hangs on a wall it's a painting, and if you can walk around it it's a sculpture. 
Author: Tom Stoppard
Nationality: British
b. 3 July 1937
  
 A man possessed of splendid talents, which he often abused, and of a sound judgment, the admonitions of which he often neglected; a man who succeeded only in an inferior department of his art, but who in that department succeeded pre-eminently. 
Author: Thomas Babington Macaulay
Nationality: English
b. 25 October 1800  - d. 28 December 1859
  
 American historians, in their eagerness to present facts and their laudable concern to tell the truth, have neglected the literary aspects of their craft. They have forgotten that there is an art of writing history. 
Author: Samuel Eliot Morison
Nationality: American
b. 9 July 1887  - d. 15 May 1976
  
 All art is autobiographical. The pearl is the oyster's autobiography.  
Author: Frederico Fellini
Nationality: Italian
b. 20 January 1920  - d. 31 October 1993
  
 The wonders of the Grand Canyon cannot be adequately represented in symbols of speech, nor by speech itself. The resources of the graphic art are taxed beyond their powers in attempting to portray its features. Language and illustration combined must fail.  
Author: John Wesley Powell
Nationality: American
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 23 September 1902
  
 She had lost the art of conversation but not, unfortunately, the power of speech. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 The art of government is the organisation of idolatry 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 You use a glass mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 Like many members of the uncultured, Cheez-It consuming public, I am not good at grasping modern art. 
Author: Dave Barry
Nationality: American
b. 3 July 1947
  
 Politics is the art of controlling your environment. 
Author: Hunter Stockton Thompson
Nationality: American
b. 18 July 1937  - d. 20 February 2005
  
 There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it. 
Author: Man Ray
Nationality: American
b. 27 August 1890  - d. 18 November 1976
  
 I have been accused of being a joker. But the most successful art to me involves humor. 
Author: Man Ray
Nationality: American
b. 27 August 1890  - d. 18 November 1976
  
 I believe entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot. 
Author: Steve Martin
Nationality: American
b. 14 August 1845
  
 What is comedy? Comedy is the art of making people laugh without making them puke. 
Author: Steve Martin
Nationality: American
b. 14 August 1845
  
 Not from the whole wide world I chose thee, Sweetheart, light of the land and the sea! The wide, wide world could not inclose thee, For thou art the whole wide world to me. 
Author: Richard Watson Gilder
Nationality: American
b. December 1844  - d.  December 1909
  
 Though, if you ask her name, she says Elise, Being plain Elizabeth, e'en let it pass, And own that, if her aspirates take their ease, She ever makes a point, in washing glass, Handling the engine, turning taps for tots, And countering change, and scorning what men say, Of posing as a dove among the pots, Nor often gives her dignity away. Her head's a work of art, and, if her eyes Be tired and ignorant, she has a waist; Cheaply the Mode she shadows; and she tries From penny novels to amend her taste; And, having mopped the zinc for certain years, And faced the gas, she fades and disappears. 
Author: William Ernest Henley
Nationality: English
b. 23 August 1849  - d. 11 July 1903
  
 The wealthy are always surrounded by hangers-on; science and art are as well. 
Author: Anton Pavlovich Chekhov
Nationality: Russian
b. 29 January 1860  - d. 15 July 1904
  
 There is nothing new in art except talent. 
Author: Anton Pavlovich Chekhov
Nationality: Russian
b. 29 January 1860  - d. 15 July 1904
  
 The principal rule of art is to please and to move. All the other rules were created to achieve this first one. 
Author: Jean Racine
Nationality: French
b. 22 December 1639  - d. 21 April 1699
  
 Devouring Famine, Plague, and War, Each able to undo mankind, Death's servile emissaries are; Nor to these alone confined, He hath at will More quaint and subtle ways to kill; A smile or kiss, as he will use the art, Shall have the cunning skill to break a heart. 
Author: James Shirley
Nationality: English
b. September 1596  - d. 29 October 1666
  
 Art includes everything that stimulates the desire to live. 
Author: Remy de Gourmont
Nationality: French
b. 4 April 1858  - d. 27 September 1915
  
 Reason clears and plants the wilderness of the imagination to harvest the wheat of art. 
Author: Austin O'Malley
Nationality: American
b. December 1858  - d.  December 1932
  
 Trash has given us an appetite for art. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 I regard criticism as an art, and if in this country and in this age it is practiced with honesty, it is no more remunerative than the work of an avant-garde film artist. My dear anonymous letter writers, if you think it is so easy to be a critic, so difficult to be a poet or a painter or film experimenter, may I suggest you try both? You may discover why there are so few critics, so many poets. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 I see little of more importance to the future of our country and of civilization than full recognition of the place of the artist. If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 Movies are so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash we have very little reason to be interested in them. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 It seems likely that many of the young who don't wait for others to call them artists, but simply announce that they are, don't have the patience to make art. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 The craftsmanship that Hollywood has always used as a selling point not only doesn't have much to do with art - the expressive use of techniques - it probably doesn't have very much to do with actual box-office appeal, either. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 Irresponsibility is part of the pleasure of all art; it is the part the schools cannot recognize. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 And for the greatest movie artists where there is a unity of technique and subject, one doesn't need to talk about technique much because it has been subsumed in the art. One doesn't want to talk about how Tolstoi got his effects but about the work itself. One doesn't want to talk about how Jean Renoir does it; one wants to talk about what he has done. One can try to separate it all out, of course, distinguish form and content for purposes of analysis. But that is a secondary, analytic function, a scholarly function, and hardly needs to be done explicitly in criticism. Taking it apart is far less important than trying to see it whole. The critic shouldn't need to tear a work apart to demonstrate that he knows how it was put together. The important thing is to convey what is new and beautiful in the work, not how it was made - which is more or less implicit. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 If we make any kind of decent, useful life for ourselves we have less need to run from it to those diminishing pleasures of the movies. When we go to the movies we want something good, something sustained, we don't want to settle for just a bit of something, because we have other things to do. If life at home is more interesting, why go to the movies? And the theatres frequented by true moviegoers - those perennial displaced persons in each city, the loners and the losers - depress us. Listening to them - and they are often more audible than the sound track - as they cheer the cons and jeer the cops, we may still share their disaffection, but it's not enough to keep us interested in cops and robbers. A little nose-thumbing isn't enough. If we've grown up at the movies we know that good work is continuous not with the academic, respectable tradition but with the glimpses of something good in trash, but we want the subversive gesture carried to the domain of discovery. Trash has given us an appetite for art. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 Kicked in the ribs, the press says "art" when "ouch" would be more appropriate. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 The recurrence of certain themes in movies suggests that each generation wants romance restated in slightly new terms, and of course it's one of the pleasures of movies as a popular art that they can answer this need. And yet, and yet - one doesn't expect an educated generation to be so soft on itself, much softer than the factory workers of the past who didn't go back over and over to the same movies, mooning away in fixation on themselves and thinking this fixation meant movies had suddenly become an art, and their art. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 When you clean them up, when you make movies respectable, you kill them. The wellspring of their art, their greatness, is in not being respectable. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 Movies are so rarely great art, that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we have very little reason to be interested in them. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 Picasso has a volatile, explosive presence. He seems to take art back to an earlier function, before the centuries of museums and masterpieces; he is the artist as clown, as conjurer, as master funmaker. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 In the sixties, the recycling of pop culture - turning it into Pop art and camp - had its own satirical zest. Now we're into a different kind of recycling. Moviemakers give movies of the past an authority that those movies didn't have; they inflate images that may never have compelled belief, images that were no more than shorthand gestures - and they use them not as larger-than-life jokes but as altars. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 In movies, the balance between art and business has always been precarious, with business outweighing art, but the business was, at least, in the hands of businessmen who loved movies. As popular entertainment, movies need something of what the vulgarian moguls had - zest, a belief in their own instincts, a sentimental dedication to producing pictures that would make their country proud of their contribution, a respect for quality, and the biggest thing: a willingness to take chances. The cool managerial sharks don't have that; neither do the academics. But the vulgarians also did more than their share of damage, and they're gone forever anyway. They were part of a different America. They were, more often than not, men who paid only lip service to high ideals, while gouging everyone for profits. The big change in the country is reflected in the fact that people in the movie business no longer feel it necessary to talk about principles at all. 
Author: Pauline Kael
Nationality: American
b. 19 June 1919  - d. 3 September 2001
  
 Criticism is the art of appraising others at one's own value. 
Author: George Jean Nathan
Nationality: American
b. 14 February 1882  - d. 8 April 1958
  
 Criticism is the windows and chandeliers of art: it illuminates the enveloping darkness in which art might otherwise rest only vaguely discernible, and perhaps altogether unseen.  
Author: George Jean Nathan
Nationality: American
b. 14 February 1882  - d. 8 April 1958
  
 The essence of all art is to have pleasure in giving pleasure. 
Author: Dale Carnegie
Nationality: American
b. 24 November 1888  - d. 1 November 1955
  
 In Plato, art is mystification because there is the heaven of Ideas; but in the earthly domain all glorification of the earth is true as soon as it is realized.  
Author: Simone de Beauvoir
Nationality: French
b. 9 January 1908  - d. 14 April 1986
  
 The past is a work of art, free of irrelevancies and loose ends. 
Author: Sir Max Beerbohm
Nationality: English
b. 24 August 1872  - d. 20 May 1956
  
 There ought to be but one large art warehouse in the world, to which the artist could carry his art-works, and from which he could carry away whatever he needed. As it is, one must be half a tradesman. 
Author: Ludwig van Beethoven
Nationality: German
b. 16 December 1770  - d. 26 March 1827
  
 Art! Who comprehends her? With whom can one consult concerning this great goddess? 
Author: Ludwig van Beethoven
Nationality: German
b. 16 December 1770  - d. 26 March 1827
  
 The world is a king, and like a king, desires flattery in return for favor; but true art is selfish and perverse - it will not submit to the mold of flattery. 
Author: Ludwig van Beethoven
Nationality: German
b. 16 December 1770  - d. 26 March 1827
  
 The politician is trained in the art of inexactitude. His words tend to be blunt or rounded, because if they have a cutting edge they may later return to wound him. 
Author: Ed Murrow
Nationality: American
b. 25 April 1908  - d. 27 April 1965
  
 Religions always have some intellectual or ideological framework, whether myth or theological doctrine; some morality or code of behaviour, whether barbaric or ethically rationalized; and some mode of ritualized or symbolic expression, in the form of ceremonial or celebration, collective devotion or thanksgiving, or religious art. 
Author: Sir Julian Sorrell Huxley
Nationality: English
b. 22 June 1887  - d. 14 February 1975
  
 He who first shortened the labor of copyists by device of movable types was disbanding hired armies, and cashiering most kings and senates, and creating a whole new democratic world: he had invented the art of printing. 
Author: Thomas Carlyle
Nationality: Scottish
b. 4 December 1795  - d. 5 September 1881
  
 Art is moral passion married to entertainment. Moral passion without entertainment is propaganda, and entertainment without moral passion is television. 
Author: Rita Mae Brown
Nationality: American
b. 28 November 1944
  
 Art is not a pastime but a priesthood. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 Art is a marriage of the conscious and the unconscious. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 Emotion resulting from a work of art is only of value when it is not obtained by sentimental blackmai 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 Film will only became an art when its materials are as inexpensive as pencil and paper. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 The reward of art is not fame or success but intoxication: that is why so many bad artists are unable to give it up. 
Author: Jean Cocteau
Nationality: French
b. 5 July 1889  - d. 11 October 1963
  
 The New York playgoer is a child of nature, and he has an honest and wholesome regard of whatever is atrocious in art. 
Author: Frank Moore Colby
Nationality: American
b. December 1865  - d.  December 1925
  
 There is no more sombre enemy of good art than the pram in the hall. 
Author: Cyril Connolly
Nationality: English
b. 10 September 1903  - d. 26 November 1974
  
 The Americans are almost ignorant of the art of music, one of the most elevating, innocent and refining of human tastes, whose influence on the habits and morals of a people is of the most beneficial tendency. 
Author: James Fenimore Cooper
Nationality: American
b. 15 September 1789  - d. 14 September 1851
  
 Our hope is less to last through Art than deeper searching of the heart, than broader range of uttered truth. 
Author: Francis Turner Palgrave
Nationality: British
b. 28 September 1824  - d. 24 October 1897
  
 A thousand forms and passions glow Upon the world-wide canvas. So With larger scope our art we ply; And if the crown be harder won, Diviner rays around it run, With strains of fuller harmony. 
Author: Francis Turner Palgrave
Nationality: British
b. 28 September 1824  - d. 24 October 1897
  
 Oh dear, oh dear, how stupid men are when they get an idea into their heads! I tell you he's a good dragon, and a friend of mine, and tells me the most beautiful stories you ever heard, all about old times and when he was little. And he's been so kind to mother, and mother'd do anything for him. And father likes him too, though father doesn't hold with art and poetry much, and always falls asleep when the dragon starts talking about style. But the fact is, nobody can help liking him when once they know him. He's so engaging and so trustful, and as simple as a child! 
Author: Kenneth Graham
Nationality: Scottish
b. 20 July 1859  - d. 6 July 1932
  
 My failure, during the first five or six years of my art training, to get set in the right direction, and the disappointment which it caused me, drove me the more persistently into writing as an alternative. 
Author: Laurence Housman
Nationality: English
b. 18 July 1865  - d. 20 February 1959
  
 Babbitt looked up irritably from the comic strips in the Evening Advocate. They composed his favorite literature and art, these illustrated chronicles in which Mr. Mutt hit Mr. Jeff with a rotten egg, and Mother corrected Father's vulgarisms by means of a rolling-pin. With the solemn face of a devotee, breathing heavily through his open mouth, he plodded nightly through every picture, and during the rite he detested interruptions. Furthermore, he felt that on the subject of Shakespeare he wasn't really an authority. Neither the Advocate-Times, the Evening Advocate, nor the Bulletin of the Zenith Chamber of Commerce had ever had an editorial on the matter, and until one of them had spoken he found it hard to form an original opinion. 
Author: Sinclair Lewis
Nationality: American
b. 7 February 1885  - d. 10 January 1951
  
 The dinner was the best style of women's-magazine art, whereby the salad was served in hollowed apples, and everything but the invincible fried chicken resembled something else 
Author: Sinclair Lewis
Nationality: American
b. 7 February 1885  - d. 10 January 1951
  
 Though Frank Shallard might have come to admire pictures, great music, civilized furniture, he had been trained to regard them as worldly, and to content himself with art which 'presented a message,' to regard 'Les Miserables' as superior because the bishop was a kind man, and 'The Scarlet Letter' as a poor book because the heroine was sinful and the author didn't mind. 
Author: Sinclair Lewis
Nationality: American
b. 7 February 1885  - d. 10 January 1951
  
 In other countries, art and literature are left to a lot of shabby bums living in attics and feeding on booze and spaghetti, but in America the successful writer or picture-painter is indistinguishable from any other decent businessman. 
Author: Sinclair Lewis
Nationality: American
b. 7 February 1885  - d. 10 January 1951
  
 Art was always a means to an end with me. You get and idea, and you just can't wait. Once you've started, then you're in there with the punches flying. There's plenty of trouble, but you can handle it. You can't back out. It gets you down once in a while, but it's exciting. Our whole business is exciting. 
Author: Walt Disney
Nationality: American
b. 5 December 1901  - d. 15 December 1966
  
 We all know in our gut that art educates. In other societies, they're aware of the power it has of speaking directly to the masses, teaching them to be better socialists, better citizens. The trouble is that with us it's fallen into the wrong hands. Forget the speculators. The concept of the collector is so rotten by now that it stinks. 
Author: Mary Therese McCarthy
Nationality: American
b. 21 June 1912  - d. 25 October 1989
  
 The theater is the only branch of art much cared for by people of wealth; like canasta, it does away with the bother of talk after dinner. 
Author: Mary Therese McCarthy
Nationality: American
b. 21 June 1912  - d. 25 October 1989
  
 Modern bodybuilding is ritual, religion, sport, art, and science, awash in Western chemistry and mathematics. Defying nature, it surpasses it. 
Author: Camille Paglia
Nationality: American
b. 2 April 1947
  
 The 1990s, after the reign of terror of academic vandalism, will be a decade of restoration: restoration of meaning, value, beauty, pleasure, and emotion to art and restoration of art to its audience. 
Author: Camille Paglia
Nationality: American
b. 2 April 1947
  
 The art of love is largely the art of persistence. 
Author: Albert Ellis
Nationality: American
b. 27 September 1913  - d. 24 July 2007
  
 Salesmanship, too, is an art; the perfection of its technique requires study and practice. 
Author: J. C. Penney
Nationality: American
b. 16 September 1875  - d. 12 February 1971
  
 The art of effective listening is essential to clear communication, and clear communication is necessary to management success. 
Author: J. C. Penney
Nationality: American
b. 16 September 1875  - d. 12 February 1971
  
 I always wanted to be an artist, whatever that was, like other chicks want to be stewardesses. I read. I painted. I thought. 
Author: Janis Joplin
Nationality: American
b. 19 January 1943  - d. 4 October 1970
  
 The art of acting is to be other than what you are.  
Author: Whoopi Goldberg
Nationality: American
b. 13 November 1955
  
 I am an artist, art has no color and no sex. 
Author: Whoopi Goldberg
Nationality: American
b. 13 November 1955
  
 Absence is one of the most useful ingredients of family life, and to dose it rightly is an art like any other. 
Author: Freya Madeleine Stark
Nationality: French
b. 31 January 1893
  
 I've been doing it all along, ever since I got out of art school. 
Author: Martin Mull
Nationality: American
b. 18 August 1943
  
 If there is some art involved, I'd like it to be that it came through the cracks of daily work. 
Author: Martin Mull
Nationality: American
b. 18 August 1943
  
 I kind of just lucked into and fell into the other profession. It was really just an outgrowth of the fact that when I was in art school, I had no money whatsoever. 
Author: Martin Mull
Nationality: American
b. 18 August 1943
  
 The art of the theater is action. It is the study of commitment. The word is an act. To SAY the word in such a way as to make it heard and understood by all in the theater is a commitment - it is the highest art to see a human being out on a stage speaking to a thousand of his or her peers saying, 'These words which I am speaking are the TRUTH - they are not an approximation of any kind. They are the God's truth, and I support them with my life,' which is what the actor does on stage. 
Author: David Mamet
Nationality: American
b. 30 November 1947
  
 Parents are usually more careful to bestow knowledge on their children rather than virtue, the art of speaking well rather than doing well; but their manners should be of the greatest concern. 
Author: Richard Buckminster Fuller
Nationality: American
b. 12 July 1895  - d. 1 July 1983
  
 Parents are usually more careful to bestow knowledge on their children rather than virtue, the art of speaking well rather than doing well; but their manners should be of the greatest concern. 
Author: Richard Buckminster Fuller
Nationality: American
b. 12 July 1895  - d. 1 July 1983
  
 I feel that art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos. A stillness which characterizes prayer, too, and the eye of the storm. I think that art has something to do with an arrest of attention in the midst of distraction. 
Author: Saul Bellow
Nationality: American
b. 10 June 1915  - d. 5 April 2005
  
 In art, truth is a means to an end; in science, it is the only end. 
Author: William Whewell
Nationality: English
b. 24 May 1794  - d. 6 March 1866
  
 Seek art from every time and place, in any form, to connect with those who really move you. 
Author: Martha Beck
Nationality: American
b. 29 November 1962
  
 Am I to sit still and see other fellows pocketing two guineas apiece for stories which I can do better myself? Not me. If anyone imagines my sole aim is art for art's sake, they are cruelly deceived. 
Author: Arnold Bennett
Nationality: English
b. 27 May 1867  - d. 27 March 1931
  
 The art of Biography Is different from Geography. Geography is about maps, But Biography is about chaps. 
Author: Edmund Clerihew Bentley
Nationality: English
b. 10 July 1875  - d. 30 March 1956
  
 This sudden and unexpected revelation of Shakespeare overwhelmed me. The lightning-flash of his genius revealed the whole heaven of art to me, illuminating its remotest depths in a single flash. I recognised the meaning of real grandeur, real beauty, and the real dramatic truth. 
Author: Hector Berlioz
Nationality: French
b. 11 December 1803  - d. 8 March 1869
  
 You request me to tell you...if it is true that the creed of all who profess to love high and serious art is: "There is no God but Bach, and Mendelssohn is his prophet"? 
Author: Hector Berlioz
Nationality: French
b. 11 December 1803  - d. 8 March 1869
  
 A modern poet has characterized the personality of art and the impersonality of science as follows: Art is I: Science is We. 
Author: Claude Bernard
Nationality: French
b. 12 July 1813  - d. 10 February 1878
  
 After a study of some forty years and more of the great religions of the world, I find none so perfect, none so scientific, none so philosophic, and none so spiritual as the great religion known by the name of Hinduism. The more you know it, the more you will love it; the more you try to understand it, the more deeply you will value it. Make no mistake; without Hinduism, India has no future. Hinduism is the soil into which India's roots are struck, and torn of that she will inevitably wither, as a tree torn out from its place. Many are the religions and many are the races flourishing in India, but none of them stretches back into the far dawn of her past, nor are they necessary for her endurance as a nation. Everyone might pass away as they came and India would still remain. But let Hinduism vanish and what is she? A geographical expression of the past, a dim memory of a perished glory, her literature, her art, her monuments, all have Hindudom written across them. And if Hindus do not maintain Hinduism, who shall save it? If India's own children do not cling to her faith, who shall guard it? India alone can save India, and India and Hinduism are one. 
Author: Annie Besant
Nationality: English
b. 1 October 1847  - d. 20 September 1933
  
 A soldier whose business is murder as a fine art, a diplomat whose calling is based on deception and secretiveness, a politician whose very life consists in compromises with his conscience, a business man whose aim is personal profit within the limits allowed by a lenient law - such may be excused if they set patriotic deception above common everyday decency and perform services as spies. They merely accept the code of morality to which modern society still conforms. Not so the scientist. The very essence of his life is the service of truth. We all know scientists who in private life do not come up to the standard of truthfulness, but who, nevertheless, would not consciously falsify the results of their researches. It is bad enough if we have to put up with these, because they reveal a lack of strength of character that is liable to distort the results of their work. A person, however, who uses science as a cover for political spying, who demeans himself to pose before a foreign government as an investigator and asks for assistance in his alleged researches in order to carry on, under this cloak, his political machinations, prostitutes science in an unpardonable way and forfeits the right to be classed as a scientist. 
Author: Franz Boas
Nationality: American
b. 9 July 1858  - d. 21 December 1942
  
 Art is the triumph over chaos. 
Author: John Cheever
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1912  - d. 18 June 1982
  
 I went into the business for the money, and the art grew out of it. If people are disillusioned by that remark, I can't help it. It's the truth. 
Author: Charlie Chaplin
Nationality: British
b. 16 April 1889  - d. 25 December 1977
  
 Talkies are spoiling the oldest art in the world - the art of pantomime. They are ruining the great beauty of silence. They are defeating the meaning of the screen. 
Author: Charlie Chaplin
Nationality: British
b. 16 April 1889  - d. 25 December 1977
  
 There are more valid facts and details in works of art than there are in history books. 
Author: Charlie Chaplin
Nationality: British
b. 16 April 1889  - d. 25 December 1977
  
 On this hapless earth There 's small sincerity of mirth, And laughter oft is but an art To drown the outcry of the heart. 
Author: Hartley Coleridge
Nationality: English
b. 19 September 1796  - d. 6 January 1849
  
 All honour and reverence to the divine beauty of form! Let us cultivate it to the utmost in men, women, and children - in our gardens and in our houses. But let us love that other beauty too, which lies in no secret of proportion, but in the secret of deep human sympathy. Paint us an angel, if you can, with a floating violet robe, and a face paled by the celestial light; paint us yet oftener a Madonna, turning her mild face upward and opening her arms to welcome the divine glory; but do not impose on us any aesthetic rules which shall banish from the region of Art those old women scraping carrots with their work-worn hands, those heavy clowns taking holiday in a dingy pot-house, those rounded backs and stupid weather-beaten faces that have bent over the spade and done the rough work of the world - those homes with their tin pans, their brown pitchers, their rough curs, and their clusters of onions. In this world there are so many of these common coarse people, who have no picturesque sentimental wretchedness! It is so needful we should remember their existence, else we may happen to leave them quite out of our religion and philosophy and frame lofty theories which only fit a world of extremes. Therefore, let Art always remind us of them; therefore let us always have men ready to give the loving pains of a life to the faithful representing of commonplace things - men who see beauty in these commonplace things, and delight in showing how kindly the light of heaven falls on them. There are few prophets in the world; few sublimely beautiful women; few heroes. I can't afford to give all my love and reverence to such rarities: I want a great deal of those feelings for my every-day fellow-men, especially for the few in the foreground of the great multitude, whose faces I know, whose hands I touch for whom I have to make way with kindly courtesy. 
Author: George Eliot
Nationality: English
b. 22 November 1819  - d. 22 December 1880
  
 Art must take reality by surprise. 
Author: Francoise Sagan
Nationality: French
b. 21 June 1935  - d. 24 September 2004
  
 Of course the illusion of art is to make one believe that great literature is very close to life, but exactly the opposite is true. Life is amorphous, literature is formal. 
Author: Francoise Sagan
Nationality: French
b. 21 June 1935  - d. 24 September 2004
  
 Of course the illusion of art is to make one believe that great literature is very close to life, but exactly the opposite is true. Life is amorphous, literature is formal. 
Author: Francoise Sagan
Nationality: French
b. 21 June 1935  - d. 24 September 2004
  
 One can never speak enough of the virtues, the dangers, the power of shared laughter. 
Author: Francoise Sagan
Nationality: French
b. 21 June 1935  - d. 24 September 2004
  
 As my poor father used to say In 1863, Once people start on all this Art Goodbye, moralitee! 
Author: Sir Alan Patrick Herbert
Nationality: English
b. 24 September 1890  - d. 11 November 1971
  
 Painters and sculptors under the Nazis often depicted the nude, but they were forbidden to show any bodily imperfections. Their nudes look like pictures in physique magazines: pinups which are both sanctimoniously asexual and (in a technical sense) pornographic, for they have the perfection of a fantasy. 
Author: Susan Sontag
Nationality: American
b. 16 January 1933  - d. 28 December 2004
  
 First of all, the art of living; then as my ideal profession, poetry and philosophy, and as my real profession, plastic arts; in the last resort, for lack of income, illustrations. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Art should be like a holiday: something to give a man the opportunity to see things differently and to change his point of view. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 My mirror probes down to the heart. I write words on the forehead and around the corners of the mouth. My human faces are truer than the real ones. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 The main thing now is not to paint precociously but to be, or at least become, an individual. The art of mastering life is the prerequisite for all further forms of expression, whether they are paintings, sculptures, tragedies, or musical compositions. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 When looking at any significant work of art, remember that a more significant one probably has had to be sacrificed. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 The beautiful, which is perhaps inseparable from art, is not after all tied to the subject, but to the pictorial representation. In this way and in no other does art overcome the ugly without avoiding it. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 To emphasize only the beautiful seems to me to be like a mathematical system that only concerns itself with positive numbers. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 He has found his style, when he cannot do otherwise, i.e., cannot do something else. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Nature can afford to be prodigal in everything, the artist must be frugal down to the last detail. Nature is garrulous to the point of confusion, let the artist be truly taciturn. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 All the things an artist must be: poet, explorer of nature, philosopher! 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 These are primitive beginnings in art, such as one usually finds in ethnographic collections or at home in one's nursery. Do not laugh, reader! Children also have artistic ability, and there is wisdom in their having it! The more helpless they are, the more instructive are the examples they furnish us; and they must be preserved from corruption at an early age. Parallel phenomena are provided by the works of the mentally diseased; neither childish behaviour nor madness are insulting words here, as they commonly are. All this is to be taken very seriously, more seriously than all the public galleries, when it comes to reforming today's art. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Colour possesses me. It will always possess me. That is the meaning of this happy hour: colour and I are one. I am a painter. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 The more horrible this world (as today, for instance), the more abstract our art, whereas a happy world brings forth an art of the here and now. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Everything vanishes around me, and works are born as if out of the void. Ripe, graphic fruits fall off. My hand has become the obedient instrument of a remote will. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 I cannot be grasped in the here and now. For I reside just as much with the dead as with the unborn. Somewhat closer to the heart of creation than usual. But not nearly close enough. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Color is primarily Quality. Secondly, it is also Weight, for it has not only color value but also brilliance. Thirdly, it is Measure, for besides Quality and Weight, it has its limits, its area, and its extent, all of which may be measured. Tone value is primarily Weight, but in its extent and its boundaries, it is also Measure. Line, however, is solely Measure. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 The pictorial work was born of movement, is itself recorded movement, and is assimilated through movement (eye muscles). 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 Formerly we used to represent things visible on earth, things we either liked to look at or would have liked to see. Today we reveal the reality that is behind visible things, thus expressing the belief that the visible world is merely an isolated case in relation to the universe and that there are many more other, latent realities. Things appear to assume a broader and more diversified meaning, often seemingly contradicting the rational experience of yesterday. There is a striving to emphasize the essential character of the accidental. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 ..the longer a line, the more of the time element it contains. Distance is time whereas a surface is apprehended more in terms of the moment. 
Author: Paul Klee
Nationality: Swiss
b. 18 December 1879  - d. 29 June 1940
  
 My limited and abstracted art is to be found under every hedge, and in every lane, and therefore nobody thinks it worth picking up. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Here I am quite alone amongst the Oaks and solitudes of Helmingham Park. I have taken quiet possession of the parsonage finding it quite empty. A woman comes up from the farm house (where I eat) and makes the bed; and I am left at liberty to wander were I please during the day. There are abundance of fine trees of all sort; through the place upon the whole affords good objects [rather] than fine scenery, but I can badly judge yet what I may have to shew You. I have made one of two... drawing that may be usefull. I shall not come home yet. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I paint by all the daylight we have and that is little enough, less perhaps than you have by much... imagine to yourself how a purl must look through a burnt glass. Letter to John Dunthorne, 1801; as quoted in Leslie Parris and Ian Fleming-Williams, 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 And however one's mind may be elevated, and kept us to what is excellent, by the works of the Great Masters - still Nature is the fountain's head, the source from whence all originally must spring - and should an artist continue his practice without referring to nature he must soon form a manner, & be reduced to the same deplorable situation as the French painter mentioned by Sir J. Reynolds, who told him that he had long ceased to look at nature for she only put him out. For the last two years I have been running after pictures, and seeking the truth at second hand. I have not endeavoured to represent nature with the same elevation of mind - but have neither endeavoured to make my performances look as if really executed by other men. I am come to a determination to make no idle visits this summer, nor to give up my time to common-place people. I shall return to Bergholt, where I shall make some laborious studies from nature - and I shall endeavour to get a pure and unaffected manner of representing the scenes that may employ me. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 There is room enough for a natural painture. The great vice of the present day is bravura, an attempt to do something beyond the truth. In endeavouring to do something better than well, they do what in reality is good for nothing. Fashion always had, & will have, its day - but truth (in all things) only will last, and can only have just claims on posterity. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 When I sit down to make a sketch from nature, the first thing I try to do is to forget that I have ever seen a picture. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 But you know Landscape is my mistress - 'tis to her that I look for fame - and all that the warmth of the imagination renders dear to Man. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I have been living a hermit-life, though always with my pencil in my hand... How much real delight have I had with the study of landscape this summer! Either I am myself improved in the art of seeing nature, which Sir Joshua call painting, or nature has unveiled her beauties to me less fastidiously. Perhaps there is something of both, so we will divide the compliment. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I have added some ploughmen to the landscape form the park pales which is a great help, but I must try and warm the picture a little more if I can... but I look to do a great deal better in future. I am determined to finish a small picture in the spot for every one I intend to make in future. But this I have always talked about but never yet done – I think however my mind is more settled and determined than ever on this point. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I am going on very well with my pictures... the park, Wivenhoe Park, is the most forward - the great difficulty has been to get so much in as they wanted to make them acquainted with the scene - on my left is a grotto with some elms - at the head of a piece of water - in the centre is the house over a beautifull wood and very far to the right is a Deer House - what it was necessary to add. So that my view comprehended to many degrees - but to day I got over the difficulty and I begin to like it 'myself'... I live in the park and mrs Rebow says I am very unsociable. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I know very well what I am about, & that my skies have not been neglected, though they often failed in execution - and often, no doubt, from an over-anxiety about them - which will alone destroy that easy appearance which nature always has - in all her movements. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 But the sound of water escaping from mill-dams, &c., willows, old rotten planks, slimy posts, and brickwork, I love such things. Shakespeare could make everything poetical; he tells us of poor Tom's haunts among "sheep cotes and mills." As long as I do paint, I shall never cease to paint such places. They have always been my delight. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Still I should paint my own places best; painting is with me but another word for feeling, and I associate "my careless boyhood" with all that lies on the banks of the Stour; those scenes made me a painter, and I am grateful; that is, I had often thought of pictures of them before ever I touched a pencil, and your picture ['The White Horse'] is one of the strongest instance I can recollect of it. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I am most anxious to get into my London painting-room, for I do not consider myself at work unless I am before a six-foot canvas. I have done a good deal of skying for I am determined to conquer all difficulties, and that among the rest. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 That landscape painter who does not make his skies a very material part of his composition, neglects to avail himself of one of his greatest aids. Sir Joshua Reynolds speaking of the "Landscape" of Titian & Salvator & Claude says 'Even their skies seem to sympathise with the Subject.' I have often been advised to consider my sky as a 'hite Sheet thrown behind the Objects'. Certainly, if the sky is 'obtrusive,' (as mine are) it is bad, but if they are 'evaded' (as mine are not) it is worse, they must and always shall with me make an effectual part of the composition. It will be difficult to name a class of landscape in which the sky is not the 'key note,' the 'standard of Scale' and the chief 'Organ of sentiment.' You may conceive, then, what a "white sheet" would do for me, impressed as I am with these notions. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 The sky is the 'source of light' in nature, and governs every thing. Even our common observations on the weather of every day, are suggested by them, but it does not occur to us. Their difficulty in painting both as to composition and execution is very great, because, with all their brilliancy and consequence, they ought not to come forward, or be hardly thought about in a picture... I know very well what I am about, and that my skies have not been neglected, though they have often failed in execution, no doubt, from an over-anxiety about them, which will alone destroy that easy appearance which nature always has in all her movements. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 This appearance of the Evening was... just after a very heavy rain - more rain in the night and very - [?light] wind which continued all the - day following while making – this sketch observed the Moon easing – very beautifully... [in the] due East over the - heavy clouds from which the late showers – had fallen. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I have likewise made many 'skies' and effects - for I wish it could be said of me as Fuselli says of Rembrandt, 'he followed nature in her calmest abodes and could pluck a flower on every hedge - yet he was born to cast a steadfast eye on the bolder phenomena of nature'... We have had noble clouds & effects of light & dark & color. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 How sweet and beautifull is every place & I visit my old Haunts with renewed delight... nothing can exceed the beautiful green of the meadows which are beginning to fill with butter Cups - & various flowers - the birds are singing from morning trill night but most of all the Sky larks - How delightfull is the Country. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Sept. 6 th, 1822, looking S.E. - 12 to 1 o’clock, fresh and bright, between showers - much the look of rain all the morning, but very fine and grand all the afternoon and evening. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 A sketch will not serve more than one state of mind & will not serve to drink at again & again - in a sketch there is nothing but the one state of mind - that which you were in at the time. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 They [French critics of the Paris Salon of 1824, where his painting 'the Hay Wain' received a gold medal] are very amusing and acute - but very shallow and feeble. Thus one - after saying: "'it is but justice to admire the truth - 'the color' - and 'general vivacity' & richness" – yet they want the objects more formed and defined &c, and say they are like the rich preludes in musick, and the full harmonious warblings of the Aeolian lyre, which means 'nothing,' and they call them orations - and harangues - and high-flown conversations affecting a careless ease - &c &v &c - Is not some of this 'blame' the highest 'praise' – what is poetry? – What is Coleridge's Ancient Mariner (the very best modern poem) but something like this? 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 It is always my endeavour however in making a picture that it should be without a companion in the world. At least such should be a painters ambition. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I had on Friday a long visit from Mr. --- alone; but my pictures do not come into his rules of whims of the art, and he said I had "lost my way." I told him that I had, perhaps other notions of art than picture admirers have in general. I looked on pictures as 'things to be avoided,' connoisseurs looked on them as things to be 'mitated'; and that, too, with such a defence and humbleness of submission, amounting to a total prostration of mind and original feeling, as must serve only to fill the world with abortions... But he was very agreeable, and endured the visit, I trust, without the usual courtesies of life being violated. What a sad thing it is that his lovely art is 'so wrested to its own destruction!' Used only to blind our eyes, and to prevent us from seeing the sub shine — the fields bloom - the tree blossom - and from hearing the foliage rustle; while old - black - rubbed out and dirty canvases take the place of God's own works. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 My friend Bonner has just set off to Charlotte Street to pack your picture (an old painting) and forward it; it is a beautiful representation of a summer’s evening; calm, warm and delicious; the colour on the man’s face is perfect sunshine. The liquid pencil of this school is replete with a beauty peculiar to itself. Nevertheless, I don’t believe they had any 'nostrums,' but plain linseed oil; 'honest linseed' as old Wilson called it. But it is always right to remember that the ordinary painters of that day used, as now, the same vehicle as their betters, and also that their works have all received the hardening and enamelling effects of time, so that we must not judge of originality by these signs always. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I ought to respect myself for my friends' sake, and my children's. It is time, at fifty-six, to begin, at least, to know oneself, - and I do know what I am not, and your regard for me has at least awakened me to believe in the possibility that I may yet make some impression with my "light" - my "dews" - my "breezes" - my bloom and freshness, - no one of which qualities has yet been perfected on the canvas of any painter in the world. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 My canvas soothes me into forgetfulness of the scene of turmoil and folly - and worse - of the scene around me. Every gleam of sunshine is blighted to me in the art at least. Can it therefore be wondered at that I paint continual storms? "Tempest o'er tempest roll'd" - still the "darkness" is majestic. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I am anxious that the world should be inclined to look to painters for information about painting. I hope to show that ours is a regularly taught profession; that it is scientific as well as poetic; that imagination alone never did, and never can, produce works that are to stand by a comparison with realities. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 We see nothing truly till we understand it. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Painting is a science and should be pursued as an inquiry into the laws of nature. Why, then, may not a landscape be considered as a branch of natural philosophy, of which pictures are but experiments? 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 The attempt to revive styles that have existed in former ages, may for a time appear to be successful, but experience may now surely teach us its impossibility. I might put on a suit of Claude Lorraine's clothes and walk into the street, and the many who knew Claude but slightly would pull off their hats to me, but I should at last meet with some one, more intimately acquainted with him, who would expose me to the contempt I merited. It is thus in all the fine arts. A new Gothic building, or a new missal, is in reality little less absurd than a new ruin. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 The first impression and a natural one is, that the fine arts have risen or declined in proportion as patronage has been given to them or withdrawn, but it will be found that there has often been more money lavished on them in their worst periods than in their best, and that the highest honours have frequently been bestowed on artists whose names are scarcely now known. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 The climax of absurdity to which the art may be carried, when led away from nature by fashion, may be best seen in the works of Boucher... His landscape, of which he was evidently fond, is pastoral; and such pastorality! the pastoral of the Opera house. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 He ought to have 'these powerful organs of expression' - colour and chiaroscuro - entirely at his command, that he may use them in every possible form, as well as that he may do with the most perfect freedom; therefore, whether he wishes to make the subject of a joyous, solemn, or meditative character, by flinging over it the cheerful aspect which the sun bestows, by a proper disposition of shade, or by the appearances that beautify its arising or its setting, a true "General Effect" should never be lost sight of. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 I am glad you encouraged me with the 'Stoke'. What say you to a summer morning? July or August, at eight or nine o’clock, after a slight shower during the night, to enhance the dews in the shadowed part of the picture, under 'Hedge row elms and hillocks green.' Then the plough, cart, horse, gate, cows, donkey, &c. are all good paintable material for the foreground, and the size of the canvas sufficient to try one’s strength, and keep one at full collar. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Many of my Hamptstead friends may remember this 'young lady' [an ash tree] at the entrance to the village. Her fate was distressing, for it is scarcely too much to say that she died of a broken heart. I made this drawing [Study of Trees, pencil on paper, circa 1821] when she was in full health and beauty; on passing some times afterwards, I saw, to my grief, that a wretched board had been nailed to her side, on which was written in large letters: 'All vagrants and beggars will be dealt with according to law.' The tree seemed to have felt the disgrace, for even then some of the top branches had withered. Two long spike nails had been driven far into her side. In another year one half became paralysed, and not long after the other shared the same fate, and this beautiful creature was cut down to a stump, just high enough to hold the board. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 My observations on clouds and skies are on scraps and bits of paper, and I have never yet put them together so as to form a lecture, which I shall do.. ..next summer.  
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 We must bear in recollection that the sentiment of the picture is that of solemnity, not gaiety & nothing garish, but the contrary - yet it must be bright, clear, alive fresh, and all the front seen. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Only think that I am now writing in a room full of Claudes... almost of the summit of my earthly ambitions. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 It is much to my advantage that several of my pictures should be seen together, as it displays to advantage their varieties of conception and also of execution, and what they gain by the mellowing hand of time which should never be forced or anticipated. Thus my pictures when first coming forth have a comparative harshness which at the time acts to my disadvantage. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Because he attempted to tell (his painting ['The Jewish Cemetery'] that which is outside the reach of art... there are ruins to indicate old age, a stream to signify the course of life, and rocks and precipices to shadow forth its dangers. But how are we to discover all this? 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 The world is wide; no two days are alike, nor even two hours; neither were there ever two leaves of a tree alike since the creation of the world. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 There is nothing ugly; I never saw an ugly thing in my life: for let the form of an object be what it may, - light, shade, and perspective will always make it beautiful. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 A self-taught painter is one taught by a very ignorant person. 
Author: John Constable
Nationality: English
b. 11 June 1776  - d. 31 March 1837
  
 Don't worry, I'll do more. 
Author: Norman Lindsay
Nationality: Australian
b. 22 February 1879  - d. 21 November 1969
  
 A bright, brassy, and jubilantly sassy show that takes a whole barrelful of bright new talents, and a handful of stimulating ideas as well, and sends them tumbling in happy profusion over the footlights. 
Author: Walter Francis Kerr
Nationality: American
b. 08 July 1913  - d. 09 October 1996
  
 In the early days of my carer as an actor, I shared what was then the prevailing attitude of Negro performers - that the content and form of a play or a film scenario was of little importance to us. What mattered was was the opportunity, which came so seldom to our folks. Later I came to understand that the Negro artist could not view the matter simply in terms of of his individual interests, and that he had a responsibility to his people who rightfully resented the traditional stereotyped portrayals of Negros on stage and screen. 
Author: Paul Robeson
Nationality: African-American
b. 09 April 1898  - d. 23 January 1976
  
 As an artist I come to sing, but as a citizen, I will always speak for peace, and no one can silence me in this. 
Author: Paul Robeson
Nationality: African-American
b. 09 April 1898  - d. 23 January 1976
  
 I did a long concert tour in England and Denmark and Sweden, and I also sang for the Soviet people, one of the finest musical audiences in the world. 
Author: Paul Robeson
Nationality: African-American
b. 09 April 1898  - d. 23 January 1976
  
 To be free, as I then knew myself to be, is to realize that all conquest is vain, even the conquest of self, which is the last act of egotism. To be joyous is to carry the ego to its last summit and to deliver it triumphantly. To know peace is total: it is the moment after, when the surrenderer is complete, when there is no longer even the consciounsness of surrender. Peace is at the centre and when it is attainded the voice issues forth in praise and benediction. Then the voice carries far and wide, to the outermost limits of the universe. Then it heals, because it brings light and the warmth of compassion. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 Through art then, one finally establishes contact with reality: that is the great discovery. Here all is play and invention; there is no solid foothold from which to launch the projectiles which will pierce the miasma of folly, ignorance and greed. The world has not to be put in order: the world is order incarnate. It is for us to put ourselves in unison with this order, to know what is the world order in contradistinction to the wishful-thinking orders which we seek to impose on one another. The power which we long to possess, in order to establish the good, the true and the beautiful, would prove to be, if we could have it, but the means of destroying one another. It is fortunate that we are powerless. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 Art is only a means to life, to the life more abundant. It is not in itself the life more abundant. It merely points the way, something which is overlooked not only by the public, but very often by the artist himself. In becoming an end it defeats itself. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 To be generous is to say yes before the man even opens his mouth. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 Perhaps the artist is nothing more than the personification of this universal maladjustment, this universal disequilibrium. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 The artist who becomes thoroughly aware consequently ceases to be one. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 To enter life by way of vagina is as good a way as any. 
Author: Henry Miller
Nationality: American
b. 26 December 1891  - d. 07 June 1980
  
 In the life of nations, what in the last resort decided questions, is a kind of Judgment Court of God. Always before God and in the world the stronger has the right to carry through what he wills.  
Author: Adolf Hitler
Nationality: German
b. 20 April 1889  - d. 30 April 1945
  
 I think that fashion and music go hand-in-hand, and they always should. It's the artist's job to create imagery that matches the music... I think they're very intertwined. 
Author: Lady Gaga
Nationality: German
b. 28 March 1986
  
 My real fans understand what it is I do, but on another level I have fans who just love my music and don’t know I write it and enjoy it shallowly - and that’s OK too. I think art and music should be just as powerful if you drink it shallow as if you drink it deep. 
Author: Lady Gaga
Nationality: German
b. 28 March 1986
  
 You listeners, the ones who found me first are, I believe, the future of great art thinkers. Because anyone that's found me now I really think is grabbing on to the ideas that I have, more than anything. It's about the music but it's also about the story. So thank you guys for loving and reading the story and being as into it and as passionate as I am. 
Author: Lady Gaga
Nationality: German
b. 28 March 1986
  
 Each of us has an inner dream that we can unfold if we will just have the courage to admit what it is. And the faith to trust our own admission. The admitting is often very difficult. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Creativity — like human life itself — begins in darkness. We need to acknowledge this. All too often, we think only in terms of light: "And then the lightbulb went on and I got it!" It is true that insights may come to us as flashes. It is true that some of these flashes may be blinding. It is, however, also true that such bright ideas are preceded by a gestation period that is interior, murky, and completely necessary. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 All too often too often we try to push, pull, outline and control our ideas instead of letting them grow organically. The creative process is a process of surrender, not control. Mystery is at the heart of creativity. That, and surprise. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 For most of us, the seductive and unstated part of "if I had enough time" is the unstated sentence "to hear myself think." In other words, we imagine that if we had time we would quiet our more shallow selves and listen to a deeper flow of inspiration. Again, this is a myth that lets us off the hook - if I wait for enough time to listen, I don't have to listen now, I don't have to take responsibility for what is trying to bubble up today. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Life is a creative endeavor. It is active, not passive. We are the yeast that leavens our lives into rich, fully baked loaves. When we experience our lives as flat and lackluster, it is our consciousness that is at fault. We hold the inner key that turns our lives from thankless to fruitful. That key is "Blessing." 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Focused on our good, focused on our abundance we naturally attract more of the same. This is spiritual law. Our consciousness is creative. What we focus on, we empower and enlarge. Good multiplies when focused upon. Negativity multiplies when focused upon. The choice is ours: Which do we want more of? 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Love is the substance of all life. Everything is connected in love, absolutely everything. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 When I listen to love, I am listening to my true nature. When I express love, I am expressing my true nature. All of us love. All of us do it more and more perfectly. The past has brought us both ashes and diamonds. In the present we find the flowers of what we've planted and the seeds of what we are becoming. I plant the seeds of love in my heart. I plant the seeds of love in the hearts of others. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 The growth of one blesses all. I am commited to grow in love. All that I touch, I leave in love. I move through this world consciously and creatively. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 Love is not love if it compelled by reason and driven by logic - love exists in spite of those things, not because of them. It is a emotion which needs no fuel to fire it or oxygen to feed it; if you have to look for the why, then stop looking; it was never there at all. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 I honor my importance and the importance of others. None of us is dispensable, none of us is replacable. In the chorus of life each of us brings a True Note, a perfect pitch that adds to the harmony of the whole. I act creatively and consciously to actively endorse and encourage the expansion of those whose lives I touch. Believing in the goodness of each, I add to the goodness of all. We bless each other even in passing. 
Author: Julia Cameron
Nationality: American   
 That state is a state of Slavery in which a man does what he likes to do in his spare time and in his working time that which is required of him. This state can only exist when what a man likes to do is to please himself. That state is a state of Freedom in which a man does what he likes to do in his working time and in his spare time that which is required of him. This state can only exist when what a man likes to do is to please God. 
Author: Eric Gill
Nationality: British
b. 22 February 1882  - d. 17 November 1940
  
 Suddenly a mist fell from my eyes and I knew the way I had to take 
Author: Edward Hagerup Grieg
Nationality: Norwegian
b. 15 June 1843  - d. 04 September 1907
  
 I went to a bookstore and asked the saleswoman, "Where's the self-help section?" She said if she told me, it would defeat the purpose.  
Author: George Carlin
Nationality: American
b. 12 May 1937  - d. 22 June 2008
  
 It is the addition of strangeness to beauty that constitutes the romantic character in art. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 Every intellectual product must be judged from the point of view of the age and the people in which it was produced. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 Hers is the head upon which all “the ends of the world are come,” and the eyelids are a little weary. It is a beauty wrought out from within upon the flesh, the deposit, little cell by cell, of strange thoughts and fantastic reveries and exquisite passions. Set it for a moment beside one of those white Greek goddesses or beautiful women of antiquity, and how would they be troubled by this beauty, into which the soul with all its maladies has passed? She is older than the rocks among which she sits; like the vampire, she has been dead many times, and learned the secrets of the grave; and has been a diver in deep seas, and keeps their fallen day about her; and trafficked for strange webs with Eastern merchants: and, as Leda, was the mother of Helen of Troy, and, as Saint Anne, the mother of Mary; and all this has been to her but as the sound of lyres and flutes, and lives only in the delicacy with which it has moulded the changing lineaments, and tinged the eyelids and the hands. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 Not the fruit of experience, but experience itself, is the end. A counted number of pulses only is given to us of a variegated, dramatic life. How may we see in them all that is to to be seen in them by the finest senses? How shall we pass most swiftly from point to point, and be present always at the focus where the greatest number of vital forces unite in their purest energy. To burn always with this hard, gem-like flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 What we have to do is to be forever curiously testing new opinions and courting new impressions. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 Art comes to you proposing frankly to give nothing but the highest quality to your moments as they pass. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 A book, like a person, has its fortunes with one; is lucky or unlucky in the precise moment of its falling in our way, and often by some happy accident counts with us for something more than its independent value. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 To know when one's self is interested, is the first condition of interesting other people. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 We need some imaginative stimulus, some not impossible ideal such as may shape vague hope, and transform it into effective desire, to carry us year after year, without disgust, through the routine-work which is so large a part of life. 
Author: Walter Horatio Pater
Nationality: English
b. 04 August 1839  - d. 30 July 1894
  
 Painting is the most beautiful of all arts. In it, all sensations are condensed, at its aspect everyone may create romance at the will of his imagination, and at a glance have his soul invaded by the most profound memories, no efforts of memory, everything summed up in one moment. Complete art which sums up all the others and completes them. Like music, it acts on the soul through the intermediary of the senses, the harmonious tones corresponding to the harmonies of sounds, but in painting, a unity is obtained which is not possible in music, where the accords follow one another, and the judgement experiences a continuous fatigue if one wants to reunite the end and the beginning. In the main, the ear is an inferior sense to the eye. The hearing can only grasp a single sound at one time, whereas the sight takes in everything and at the same time simplifies at its will.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 With this painting, I tried to make everything breathe faith, quiet suffering, religious and primitive style and great nature with its scream.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 Life at Papeete soon became a burden. It was Europe, the Europe which I had thought to shake off - and that under the aggravating circumstances of colonial snobbism, and the imitation, grotesque even to the point of caricature, of our customs, fashions, vices, and absurdities of civilization. Was I to have made this far journey, only to find the very thing which I had fled? 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 Many people say that I don't know how to draw because I don't draw particular forms. When will they understand that execution, drawing and color - in other words, style - must be in harmony with the poem?  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 Life being what it is, one dreams of revenge - and has to content oneself with dreaming.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 How do you see this tree? Is it really green? Use green, then, the most beautiful green on your palette. And that shadow, rather blue? Don't be afraid to paint it as blue as possible.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 I must confess that I too am a woman and that I am always prepared to applaud a woman who is more daring than I, and is equal to a man in fighting for freedom of behavior. 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 A great sentiment can be rendered immediately. Dream on it and look for the simplest form in which you can express it.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 In order to produce something new, you have to return to the original source, to the childhood of mankind. 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 A time will come when people will think I am a myth, or rather something the newspapers have made up.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 As I wanted to suggest a luxuriant and untamed type of nature, a tropical sun that sets aglow everything around it, I was obliged to give my figures a suitable setting. It is indeed the outdoor life - yet intimate at the same time, in the thickets and the shady streams, these women whispering in an immense palace decorated by nature itself, with all the riches that Tahiti has to offer. This is the reason behind all these fabulous colors, this subdued and silent glow. "But none of this exists!" "Oh yes it does, as an equivalent of the grandeur, the depth, the mystery of Tahiti, when you have to express it on a canvas measuring only one square meter." Very subtle, very knowing in her naïveté is the Tahitian Eve. The riddle hiding in the depth of her childlike eyes is still incommunicable to me. 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 My eyes close and uncomprehendingly see the dream in the infinite space that stretches away, elusive, before me.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 No one wants my painting because it is different from other people's - peculiar, crazy public that demands the greatest possible degree of originality on the painter's part and yet won't accept him unless his work resembles that of the others!  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 You have long known what I have tried to establish: the right to dare everything; yet the difficulty I have had finding enough money to live on has been too great, and my capacities have not produced a very big result but the mechanism has got underway nevertheless. The public does not owe me anything because the pictorial work I have done is only relatively good, but the painters who benefit from that freedom today do owe me something.  
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 How long have I been here? Henceforward for? I shall not know. For I have been traveling for too long. My bones too weary to remember my age. Hence, how long have I been here? Thou shalt never know. 
Author: Paul Gauguin
Nationality: French
b. 07 June 1848  - d. 08 May 1903
  
 If you want a golden rule that will fit everybody, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Beauty, which is what is meant by art, using the word in its widest sense, is, I contend, no mere accident to human life, which people can take or leave as they choose, but a positive necessity of life. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 The greatest foe to art is luxury, art cannot live in its atmosphere.  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Simplicity of life, even the barest, is not a misery, but the very foundation of refinement: a sanded floor and whitewashed walls, and the green trees, and flowery meads, and living waters outside; or a grimy palace amid the smoke with a regiment of housemaids always working to smear the dirt together so that it may be unnoticed; which, think you, is the most refined, the most fit for a gentleman of those two dwellings? So I say, if you cannot learn to love real art; at least learn to hate sham art and reject it. It is not because the wretched thing is so ugly and silly and useless that I ask you to cast it from you; it is much more because these are but the outward symbols of the poison that lies within them; look through them and see all that has gone to their fashioning, and you will see how vain labour, and sorrow, and disgrace have been their companions from the first - and all this for trifles that no man really needs!  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 So long as the system of competition in the production and exchange of the means of life goes on, the degradation of the arts will go on; and if that system is to last forever, then art is doomed, and will surely die; that is to say, civilization will die. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 What shall I say concerning its mastery of and its waste of mechanical power, its commonwealth so poor, its enemies of the commonwealth so rich, its stupendous organization - for the misery of life! Its contempt of simple pleasures which everyone could enjoy but for its folly? Its eyeless vulgarity which has destroyed art, the one certain solace of labour? All this I felt then as now, but I did not know why it was so. The hope of the past times was gone, the struggles of mankind for many ages had produced nothing but this sordid, aimless, ugly confusion. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 What I mean by Socialism is a condition of society in which there should be neither rich nor poor, neither master nor master's man, neither idle nor overworked, neither brain­slack brain workers, nor heart­sick hand workers, in a word, in which all men would be living in equality of condition, and would manage their affairs unwastefully, and with the full consciousness that harm to one would mean harm to all - the realisation at last of the meaning of the word commonwealth. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 I love art, and I love history, but it is living art and living history that I love... It is in the interest of living art and living history that I oppose so-called restoration. What history can there be in a building bedaubed with ornament, which cannot at the best be anything but a hopeless and lifeless imitation of the hope and vigour of the earlier world?  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 With the arrogance of youth, I determined to do no less than to transform the world with Beauty. If I have succeeded in some small way, if only in one small corner of the world, amongst the men and women I love, then I shall count myself blessed, and blessed, and blessed, and the work goes on. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Pray but one prayer for me 'twixt thy closed lips, Think but one thought of me up in the stars. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Wert thou more fickle than the restless sea, Still should I love thee, knowing thee for such. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 The majesty That from man's soul looks through his eager eyes. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Now such an one for daughter Creon had As maketh wise men fools and young men mad. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 O thrush, your song is passing sweet But never a song that you have sung, Is half so sweet as thrushes sang When my dear Love and I were young. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 From out the throng and stress of lies, From out the painful noise of sighs, One voice of comfort seems to rise: "It is the meaner part that dies." 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Masters, I have to tell a tale of woe, A tale of folly and of wasted life, Hope against hope, the bitter dregs of strife, Ending, where all things end, in death at last. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Rejoice, lest pleasureless ye die. Within a little time must ye go by. Stretch forth your open hands, and while ye live Take all the gifts that Death and Life may give! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Forgetfulness of grief I yet may gain; In some wise may come ending to my pain; It may be yet the Gods will have me glad! Yet, Love, I would that thee and pain I had! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Earth, left silent by the wind of night, Seems shrunken 'neath the gray unmeasured height.  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Late February days; and now, at last, Might you have thought that Winter's woe was past; So fair the sky was and so soft the air. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 A world made to be lost, — A bitter life 'twixt pain and nothing tost. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 To happy folk All heaviest words no more of meaning bear Than far-off bells saddening the Summer air. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Of Heaven or Hell I have no power to sing, I cannot ease the burden of your fears, Or make quick-coming death a little thing, Or bring again the pleasure of past years, Nor for my words shall ye forget your tears, Or hope again for aught that I can say, The idle singer of an empty day. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 The heavy trouble, the bewildering care That weighs us down who live and earn our bread, These idle verses have no power to bear; So let em sing of names rememberèd, Because they, living not, can ne'er be dead, Or long time take their memory quite away From us poor singers of an empty day. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Dreamer of dreams, born out of my due time, Why should I strive to set the crooked straight? Let it suffice me that my murmuring rhyme Beats with light wing against the ivory gate, Telling a tale not too importunate To those who in the sleepy region stay, Lulled by the singer of an empty day. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Folk say, a wizard to a northern king At Christmas-tide such wondrous things did show, That through one window men beheld the spring, And through another saw the summer glow, And through a third the fruited vines a-row, While still, unheard, but in its wonted way, Piped the drear wind of that December day. So with this Earthly Paradise it is, If ye will read aright, and pardon me, Who strive to build a shadowy isle of bliss Midmost the beating of the steely sea, Where tossed about all hearts of men must be; Whose ravening monsters mighty men shall slay, Not the poor singer of an empty day. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 It happened once, some men of Italy Midst the Greek Islands went a sea-roving, And much good fortune had they on the sea: Of many a man they had the ransoming, And many a chain they gat and goodly thing; And midst their voyage to an isle they came, Whereof my story keepeth not the name. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 One was there who left all his friends behind; Who going inland ever more and more, And being left quite alone, at last did find A lonely valley sheltered from the wind, Wherein, amidst an ancient cypress wood, A long-deserted ruined castle stood. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Noble the house was, nor seemed built for war, But rather like the work of other days, When men, in better peace than now they are, Had leisure on the world around to gaze, And noted well the past times' changing ways; And fair with sculptured stories it was wrought, By lapse of time unto dim ruin brought. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 But taking note of these things, at the last The mariner beneath the gateway passed. And there a lovely cloistered court he found, A fountain in the mist o'erthrown and dry, And in the cloister briers twining round The slender shafts; the wondrous imagery Outworn by more than many years gone by; Because the country people, in their fear Of wizardry, had wrought destruction here, And piteously these fair things had been maimed; There stood great Jove, lacking his head of might; Here was the archer, swift Apollo, lamed; The shapely limbs of Venus hid from sight By weeds and shards; Diana's ankles light Bound with the cable of some coasting ship; And rusty nails through Helen's maddening lip. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 And there he saw a door within the wall, Well-hinged, close shut; nor was there in that place Another on its hinges, therefore he Stood there and pondered for a little space And thought: "Perchance some marvel I shall see, For surely here some dweller there must be, Because this door seems whole and new and sound, While nought but ruin I can see around." 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 No pillager or wrecker had been there; It seemed that time had passed on otherwhere, Nor laid a finger on this hidden place Rich with the wealth of some forgotten race. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 The wanderer trembled when he saw all this, Because he deemed by magic it was wrought; Yet in his heart a longing for some bliss Whereof the hard and changing world knows nought, Arose and urged him on, and dimmed the thought That there perchance some devil lurked to slay The heedless wanderer from the light of day. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Upon the floor uncounted medals lay Like things of little value; here and there Stood golden caldrons, that might well outweigh The biggest midst an emperor's copper-ware, And golden cups were set on tables fair, Themselves of gold; and in all hollow things Were stored great gems, worthy the crowns of kings. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 And then the image, that well-nigh erased Over the castle-gate he did behold, Above a door well wrought in coloured gold Again he saw; a naked girl with wings Enfolded in a serpent's scaly rings. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 "What man art thou that thus hast wandered here, And found this lonely chamber where I dwell? Beware, beware! for I have many a spell; If greed of power and gold have led thee on, Not lightly shall this untold wealth be won. But if thou com'st here knowing of my tale, In hope to bear away my body fair, Stout must thine heart be, nor shall that avail If thou a wicked soul in thee dost bear; So once again I bid thee to beware, Because no base man things like this may see, And live thereafter long and happily." 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 From those thy words, I deem from some distress By deeds of mine thy dear life I might save; O then, delay not! if one ever gave His life to any, mine I give to thee; Come, tell me what the price of love must be? Swift death, to be with thee a day and night And with the earliest dawning to be slain? Or better, a long year of great delight, And many years of misery and pain? Or worse, and this poor hour for all my gain? A sorry merchant am I on this day, E'en as thou willest so must I obey. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 "God grant indeed thy words are not for nought! Then shalt thou save me, since for many a day To such a dreadful life I have been brought: Nor will I spare with all my heart to pay What man soever takes my grief away; Ah! I will love thee, if thou lovest me But well enough my saviour now to be. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 A queen I was, what Gods I knew I loved, And nothing evil was there in my thought, And yet by love my wretched heart was moved Until to utter ruin I was brought! Alas! thou sayest our gods were vain and nought, Wait, wait, till thou hast heard this tale of mine, Then shalt thou think them devilish or divine. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 For Queen Diana did my body change Into a fork-tongued dragon flesh and fell, And through the island nightly do I range, Or in the green sea mate with monsters strange, When in the middle of the moonlit night The sleepy mariner I do affright. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Drowsy I lie, no folk at my command, Who once was called the Lady of the Land; Who might have bought a kingdom with a kiss, Yea, half the world with such a sight as this. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 "Wilt thou not save me? once in every year This rightful form of mine that thou dost see By favour of the Goddess have I here From sunrise unto sunset given me, That some brave man may end my misery. And thou — art thou not brave? can thy heart fail, Whose eyes e'en now are weeping at my tale? 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Then listen! when this day is overpast, A fearful monster shall I be again, And thou mayst be my saviour at the last, Unless, once more, thy words are nought and vain. If thou of love and sovereignty art fain, Come thou next morn, and when thou seest here A hideous dragon, have thereof no fear, But take the loathsome head up in thine hands And kiss it, and be master presently Of twice the wealth that is in all the lands From Cathay to the head of Italy; And master also, if it pleaseth thee, Of all thou praisest as so fresh and bright, Of what thou callest crown of all delight. Ah! with what joy then shall I see again The sunlight on the green grass and the trees, And hear the clatter of the summer rain, And see the joyous folk beyond the seas. Ah, me! to hold my child upon my knees After the weeping of unkindly tears And all the wrongs of these four hundred years. Go now, go quick! leave this grey heap of stone; And from thy glad heart think upon thy way, How I shall love thee — yea, love thee alone, That bringest me from dark death unto day; For this shall be thy wages and thy pay; Unheard-of wealth, unheard-of love is near, If thou hast heart a little dread to bear. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 "Ah! wilt thou leave me then without one kiss, To slay the very seeds of fear and doubt, That glad to-morrow may bring certain bliss? Hast thou forgotten how love lives by this, The memory of some hopeful close embrace, Low whispered words within some lonely place?" 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 So on he went, and on the way he thought Of all the glorious things of yesterday, Nought of the price whereat they must be bought, But ever to himself did softly say "No roaming now, my wars are passed away, No long dull days devoid of happiness, When such a love my yearning heart shall bless." 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Meanwhile the dragon, seeing him clean gone, Followed him not, but crying horribly, Caught up within her jaws a block of stone And ground it into powder, then turned she, With cries that folk could hear far out at sea, And reached the treasure set apart of old, To brood above the hidden heaps of gold. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: though the World be a-waning And the woods have no voice but the voice of complaining, Though the sky be too dark for dim eyes to discover The gold-cups and daisies fair blooming thereunder, Though the hills be held shadows, and the sea a dark wonder, And this day draw a veil over all deeds passed over, Yet their hands shall not tremble, their feet shall not falter; The void shall not weary, the fear shall not alter These lips and these eyes of the loved and the lover.  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: have no thought for to-morrow If ye lie down this even in rest from your pain, Ye who have paid for your bliss with great sorrow. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Till again shall the change come, and words your lips say not Your hearts make all plain in the best wise they would And the world ye thought waning is glorious and good. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 The wind is not helpless for any man's need, Nor falleth the rain but for thistle and weed. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 O surely this morning all sorrow is hidden, All battle is hushed for this even at least; And no one this noontide may hunger, unbidden To the flowers and the singing and the joy of your feast Where silent ye sit midst the world's tale increased. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Lo, the lovers unloved that draw nigh for your blessing! For your tale makes the dreaming whereby yet they live The dreams of the day with their hopes of redressing, The dreams of the night with the kisses they give, The dreams of the dawn wherein death and hope strive. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Ah, what shall we say then, but that earth threatened often Shall live on for ever that such things may be, That the dry seed shall quicken, the hard earth shall soften, And the spring-bearing birds flutter north o'er the sea, That earth's garden may bloom round my love's feet and me? 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: it grew up without heeding In the days when ye knew not its name nor its measure, And its leaflets untrodden by the light feet of pleasure Had no boast of the blossom, no sign of the seeding, As the morning and evening passed over its treasure. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 And what do ye say then? - That Spring long departed Has brought forth no child to the softness and showers; - That we slept and we dreamed through the Summer of flowers; We dreamed of the Winter, and waking dead-hearted Found Winter upon us and waste of dull hours. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Nay, Spring was o'er-happy and knew not the reason, And Summer dreamed sadly, for she thought all was ended In her fulness of wealth that might not be amended; But this is the harvest and the garnering season, And the leaf and the blossom in the ripe fruit are blended. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 It sprang without sowing, it grew without heeding, Ye knew not its name and ye knew not its measure, Ye noted it not mid your hope and your pleasure; There was pain in its blossom, despair in its seeding, But daylong your bosom now nurseth its treasure. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: draw near and behold me Ye who pass by the way to your rest and your laughter, And are full of the hope of the dawn coming after; For the strong of the world have bought me and sold me And my house is all wasted from threshold to rafter. - Pass by me, and hearken, and think of me not!  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Ye know not how void is your hope and your living: Depart with your helping lest yet ye undo me! Ye know not that at nightfall she draweth near to me, There is soft speech between us and words of forgiving Till in dead of the midnight her kisses thrill through me. - Pass by me and harken, and waken me not! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Wherewith will ye buy it, ye rich who behold me? Draw out from your coffers your rest and your laughter, And the fair gilded hope of the dawn coming after! Nay this I sell not, — though ye bought me and sold me, - For your house stored with such things from threshold to rafter. - Pass by me, I hearken, and think of you not! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: through the trouble and tangle From yesterday's dawning to yesterday's night I sought through the vales where the prisoned winds wrangle, Till, wearied and bleeding, at end of the light I met him, and we wrestled, and great was my might. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 And the Shadow of the Night and not Love was departed; I was sore, I was weary, yet Love lived to seek; So I scaled the dark mountains, and wandered sad-hearted Over wearier wastes, where e'en sunlight was bleak, With no rest of the night for my soul waxen weak. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 With no rest of the night; for I waked mid a story Of a land wherein Love is the light and the lord, Where my tale shall be heard, and my wounds gain a glory, And my tears be a treasure to add to the hoard Of pleasure laid up for his people's reward. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: cherish life that abideth, Lest ye die ere ye know him, and curse and misname him; For who knows in what ruin of all hope he hideth, On what wings of the terror of darkness he rideth? And what is the joy of man's life that ye blame him For his bliss grown a sword, and his rest grown a fire? 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Live on, for Love liveth, and earth shall be shaken By the wind of his wings on the triumphing morning, When the dead, and their deeds that die not shall awaken, And the world's tale shall sound in your trumpet of warning, And the sun smite the banner called Scorn of the Scorning, And dead pain ye shall trample, dead fruitless desire, As ye wend to pluck out the new world from the fire.  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Dawn talks to Day Over dew-gleaming flowers, Night flies away Till the resting of hours: Fresh are thy feet And with dreams thine eyes glistening, Thy still lips are sweet Though the world is a-listening. O Love, set a word in my mouth for our meeting, Cast thine arms round about me to stay my heart's beating! O fresh day, O fair day, O long day made ours! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Morn shall meet noon While the flower-stems yet move, Though the wind dieth soon And the clouds fade above. Loved lips are thine As I tremble and hearken; Bright thine eyes shine, Though the leaves thy brow darken. O Love, kiss me into silence, lest no word avail me, Stay my head with thy bosom lest breath and life fail me! O sweet day, O rich day, made long for our love! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Let us speak, love, together some words of our story, That our lips as they part may remember the glory! O soft day, O calm day, made clear for our sake! 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Eve shall kiss night, And the leaves stir like rain As the wind stealeth light O'er the grass of the plain. Unseen are thine eyes Mid the dreamy night's sleeping, And on my mouth there lies The dear rain of thy weeping. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: while ye deemed him a-sleeping, There were signs of his coming and sounds of his feet; His touch it was that would bring you to weeping, When the summer was deepest and music most sweet. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 All wonder of pleasure, all doubt of desire, All blindness, are ended, and no more ye feel If your feet treat his flowers or the flames of his fire, If your breast meet his balms or the edge of his steel. Change is come, and past over, no more strife, no more learning: Now your lips and your forehead are sealed with his seal, Look backward and smile at the thorns and the burning. - Sweet rest, O my soul, and no fear of returning!  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Love is enough: ho ye who seek saving, Go no further; come hither; there have been who have found it, And these know the House of Fulfilment of Craving; These know the Cup with the roses around it; These know the World's Wound and the balm that hath bound it: Cry out, the World heedeth not, "Love, lead us home!" 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 O hearken the words of his voice of compassion: "Come cling round about me, ye faithful who sicken Of the weary unrest and the world's passing fashions! As the rain in mid-morning your troubles shall thicken, But surely within you some Godhead doth quicken, As ye cry to me heeding, and leading you home." 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 "Come - pain ye shall have, and be blind to the ending! Come - fear ye shall have, mid the sky's overcasting! Come - change ye shall have, for far are ye wending! Come - no crown ye shall have for your thirst and your fasting, But the kissed lips of Love and fair life everlasting! Cry out, for one heedeth, who leadeth you home!" 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 To give people pleasure in the things they must perforce use, that is one great office of decoration; to give people pleasure in the things they must perforce make, that is the other use of it. Does not our subject look important enough now? I say that without these arts, our rest would be vacant and uninteresting, our labour mere endurance, mere wearing away of body and mind. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 When we can get beyond that smoky world, there, out in the country we may still see the works of our fathers yet alive amidst the very nature they were wrought into, and of which they are so completely a part: for there indeed if anywhere, in the English country, in the days when people cared about such things, was there a full sympathy between the works of man, and the land they were made for: - the land is a little land; too much shut up within the narrow seas, as it seems, to have much space for swelling into hugeness: there are no great wastes overwhelming in their dreariness, no great solitudes of forests, no terrible untrodden mountain-walls: all is measured, mingled, varied, gliding easily one thing into another: little rivers, little plains, swelling, speedily- changing uplands, all beset with handsome orderly trees; little hills, little mountains, netted over with the walls of sheep- walks: all is little; yet not foolish and blank, but serious rather, and abundant of meaning for such as choose to seek it: it is neither prison nor palace, but a decent home. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 I do not want art for a few, any more than education for a few, or freedom for a few. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 It is right and necessary that all men should have work to do which shall be worth doing, and be of itself pleasant to do; and which should be done under such conditions as would make it neither over-wearisome nor over-anxious. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Nothing should be made by man's labour which is not worth making; or which must be made by labour degrading to the makers. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 When I was journeying (in a dream of the night) down the well-remembered reaches of the Thames betwixt Streatley and Wallingford, where the foothills of the White Horse fall back from the broad stream, I came upon a clear-seen mediæval town standing up with roof and tower and spire within its walls, grey and ancient, but untouched from the days of its builders of old. All this I have seen in the dreams of the night clearer than I can force myself to see them in dreams of the day. So that it would have been nothing new to me the other night to fall into an architectural dream if that were all, and yet I have to tell of things strange and new that befell me after I had fallen asleep. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Forsooth, ye have heard it said that ye shall do well in this world that in the world to come ye may live happily for ever; do ye well then, and have your reward both on earth and in heaven; for I say to you that earth and heaven are not two but one; and this one is that which ye know, and are each one of you a part of, to wit, the Holy Church, and in each one of you dwelleth the life of the Church, unless ye slay it. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Forsooth, brothers, fellowship is heaven, and lack of fellowship is hell: fellowship is life, and lack of fellowship is death: and the deeds that ye do upon the earth, it is for fellowship's sake that ye do them, and the life that is in it, that shall live on and on for ever, and each one of you part of it, while many a man's life upon the earth from the earth shall wane. Therefore, I bid you not dwell in hell but in heaven, or while ye must, upon earth, which is a part of heaven, and forsooth no foul part. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Forsooth, he that waketh in hell and feeleth his heart fail him, shall have memory of the merry days of earth, and how that when his heart failed him there, he cried on his fellow, were it his wife or his son or his brother or his gossip or his brother sworn in arms, and how that his fellow heard him and came and they mourned together under the sun, till again they laughed together and were but half sorry between them. This shall he think on in hell, and cry on his fellow to help him, and shall find that therein is no help because there is no fellowship, but every man for himself. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 I pondered all these things, and how men fight and lose the battle, and the thing that they fought for comes about in spite of their defeat, and when it comes turns out not to be what they meant, and other men have to fight for what they meant under another name. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 It is for him that is lonely or in prison to dream of fellowship, but for him that is of a fellowship to do and not to dream. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Mastership hath many shifts whereby it striveth to keep itself alive in the world. And now hear a marvel: whereas thou sayest these two times that out of one man ye may get but one man's work, in days to come one man shall do the work of a hundred men - yea, of a thousand or more: and this is the shift of mastership that shall make many masters and many rich men. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 The word Revolution, which we Socialists are so often forced to use, has a terrible sound in most people's ears, even when we have explained to them that it does not necessarily mean a change accompanied by riot and all kinds of violence, and cannot mean a change made mechanically and in the teeth of opinion by a group of men who have somehow managed to seize on the executive power for the moment. Even when we explain that we use the word revolution in its etymological sense, and mean by it a change in the basis of society, people are scared at the idea of such a vast change, and beg that you will speak of reform and not revolution. As, however, we Socialists do not at all mean by our word revolution what these worthy people mean by their word reform, I can't help thinking that it would be a mistake to use it, whatever projects we might conceal beneath its harmless envelope. So we will stick to our word, which means a change of the basis of society; it may frighten people, but it will at least warn them that there is something to be frightened about, which will be no less dangerous for being ignored; and also it may encourage some people, and will mean to them at least not a fear, but a hope.  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Fear and Hope - those are the names of the two great passions which rule the race of man, and with which revolutionists have to deal; to give hope to the many oppressed and fear to the few oppressors, that is our business; if we do the first and give hope to the many, the few must be frightened by their hope; otherwise we do not want to frighten them; it is not revenge we want for poor people, but happiness; indeed, what revenge can be taken for all the thousands of years of the sufferings of the poor?  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Soon there will be nothing left except the lying dreams of history, the miserable wreckage of our museums and picture-galleries, and the carefully guarded interiors of our aesthetic drawing-rooms, unreal and foolish, fitting witnesses of the life of corruption that goes on there, so pinched and meagre and cowardly, with its concealment and ignoring, rather than restraint of, natural longings; which does not forbid the greedy indulgence in them if it can but be decently hidden. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 I have said as much as that the aim of art was to destroy the curse of labour by making work the pleasurable satisfaction of our impulse towards energy, and giving to that energy hope of producing something worth its exercise. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 This has sometimes appeared in paraphrased form as: "The aim of art is to destroy the curse of labour by making work the pleasurable satisfaction of our impulse towards energy, and giving to that energy hope of producing something worth the exercise." 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 I think that to all living things there is a pleasure in the exercise of their energies, and that even beasts rejoice in being lithe and swift and strong. But a man at work, making something which he feels will exist because he is working at it and wills it, is exercising the energies of his mind and soul as well as of his body. Memory and imagination help him as he works. Not only his own thoughts, but the thoughts of the men of past ages guide his hands; and, as a part of the human race, he creates. If we work thus we shall be men, and our days will be happy and eventful. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Worthy work carries with it the hope of pleasure in rest, the hope of the pleasure in our using what it makes, and the hope of pleasure in our daily creative skill. All other work but this is worthless; it is slaves' work - mere toiling to live, that we may live to toil. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Go back again, now you have seen us, and your outward eyes have learned that in spite of all the infallible maxims of your day there is yet a time of rest in store for the world, when mastery has changed into fellowship - but not before. Go back again, then, and while you live you will see all round you people engaged in making others live lives which are not their own, while they themselves care nothing for their own real lives - men who hate life though they fear death. Go back and be the happier for having seen us, for having added a little hope to your struggle. Go on living while you may, striving, with whatsoever pain and labour needs must be, to build up little by little the new day of fellowship, and rest, and happiness.  
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 If others can see it as I have seen it, then it may be called a vision rather than a dream. 
Author: William Morris
Nationality: English
b. 24 March 1834  - d. 03 October 1896
  
 Claiming the more exotic St. Petersburg, Russia as his birthplace: I shall be born when and where I want, and I do not choose to be born in Lowell. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 I hope, dear father, you will not object to my choice. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 General upheaval!! I had to empty my house and purify it from cellar to eaves. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 I say I can’t thank you too much for the name ‘Nocturne’ as a title for my moonlights! You have no idea what an irritation it proves to the critics and consequent pleasure to me -besides it is really so charming and does so poetically say all that I want to say and no more than I wish! 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Whistler to Liverpool shipping magnate Frederick Leyland: Ah, I have made you famous. My work will live when you are forgotten. Still, per chance, in the dim ages to come you will be remembered as the proprietor of the Peacock Room. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 It is the most debased style of criticism I have had thrown at me yet. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 John Ruskin: "The labour of two days is that for which you ask two hundred guineas?" Whistler: "No. I ask it for the knowledge I have gained in the work of a lifetime." 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Two and two continue to make four, in spite of the whine of the amateur for three, or the cry of the critic for five. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 In response to a lady who said that a landscape reminded her of his work: Yes, madam, Nature is creeping up. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 A group from Glasgow sought in 1891 to purchase his portrait of Thomas Carlyle was shocked that Whistler's price was 1000 guineas. A spokesman countered that the portrait was not even life size. Whistler replied, "But, you know, few men are life size." 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 May I therefore acknowledge the tender glow of health induced by reading, as I sat here in the morning sun, the flattering attention paid me by your gentleman of ready wreath and quick biography! 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Art is a goddess of dainty thought,reticent of habit,abjuring all obthisiveness,purposing in no way to better others.She is ,withal selfishly occupied with her own perfection only- having no desire to teach. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Art is upon the Town! 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Listen! There was never an artistic period. There was never an art-loving nation. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Nature is usually wrong. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 The rare few, who, early in life, have rid themselves of the friendship of the many. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 To say of a picture, as is often said in its praise, that it shows great and earnest labor, is to say that it is incomplete and unfit for view. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Industry in art is a necessity - not a virtue - and any evidence of the same, in the production, is a blemish, not a quality; a proof, not of achievement, but of absolutely insufficient work, for work alone will efface the footsteps of work. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 The masterpiece should appear as the flower to the painter - perfect in its bud as in its bloom - with no reason to explain its presence - no mission to fulfill - a joy to the artist, a delusion to the philanthropist - a puzzle to the botanist - an accident of sentiment and alliteration to the literary man. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 It is for the artist...in portrait painting to put on canvas something more than the face the model wears for that one day; to paint the man, in short, as well as his features. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 One cannot continually disappoint a Continent. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 I am not arguing with you – I am telling you. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 I can't tell you if genius is hereditary, because heaven has granted me no offspring. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 If other people are going to talk, conversation becomes impossible. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 It takes a long time for a man to look like his portrait. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 It would have been called provincial and barbarous; it would have been cited as an incident of low civilization to confuse such art. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Just as music is the poetry of the ear,so painting is that of the eye. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 ou shouldn't say it is not good. You should say, you do not like it; and then, you know, you're perfectly safe. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 Art should be independent of all claptrap - should stand alone and appeal to the artistic sense of eye or ear, without confounding this with emotions entirely foreign to it, as devotion, pity, love, patriotism and the like. 
Author: James McNeil Whistler
Nationality: American
b. 10 July 1834  - d. 17 July 1903
  
 I believe neither in what I touch nor what I see. I only believe in what I do not see, and solely in what I feel. 
Author: Gustav Moreau
Nationality: French
b. 06 April 1826  - d. 18 April 1898
  
 I have never looked for dream in reality or reality in dream. I have allowed my imagination free play, and I have not been led astray by it. 
Author: Gustav Moreau
Nationality: French
b. 06 April 1826  - d. 18 April 1898
  
 I am dominated by one thing, an irresistible, burning attraction towards the abstract. The expression of human feelings and the passions of man certainly interest me deeply, but I am less concerned with expressing the motions of the soul and mind than to render visible, so to speak, the inner flashes of intuition which have something divine in their apparent insignificance and reveal magic, even divine horizons, when they are transposed into the marvellous effects of pure plastic art. 
Author: Gustav Moreau
Nationality: French
b. 06 April 1826  - d. 18 April 1898
  
 No one could have less faith in the absolute and definitive importance of the work created by man, because I believe that this world is nothing but a dream... 
Author: Gustav Moreau
Nationality: French
b. 06 April 1826  - d. 18 April 1898
  
 This bored fantastic woman, with her animal nature, giving herself the pleasure of seeing her enemy struck down, not a particularly keen one for her because she is so weary of having all her desires satisfied. This woman, walking nonchalantly in a vegetal, bestial manner, through the gardens that have just been stained by a horrible murder, which has frightened the executioner himself and made him flee distracted... When I want to render these fine nuances, I do not find them in the subject, but in the nature of women in real life who seek unhealthy emotions and are too stupid even to understand the horror in the most appalling situations. 
Author: Gustav Moreau
Nationality: French
b. 06 April 1826  - d. 18 April 1898
  
 They will simplify painting. I am the bridge over which some you will go. 
Author: Gustav Moreau
Nationality: French
b. 06 April 1826  - d. 18 April 1898
  
 Conception, my boy, fundamental brain work, is what makes all the difference in art. 
Author: Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Nationality: English
b. 12 May 1828  - d. 9 April 1882
  
 Great art is an instant arrested in eternity. 
Author: James Gibbons Huneker
Nationality: American
b. 31 January 1860  - d. 09 February 1921
  
 He dares to be a fool, and that is the first step in the direction of wisdom. 
Author: James Gibbons Huneker
Nationality: American
b. 31 January 1860  - d. 09 February 1921
  
 Life is like an onion: you peel off layer after layer and then you find there is nothing in it. 
Author: James Gibbons Huneker
Nationality: American
b. 31 January 1860  - d. 09 February 1921
  
 Scratch an artist and you surprise a child. 
Author: James Gibbons Huneker
Nationality: American
b. 31 January 1860  - d. 09 February 1921
  
 The contour should come last, only a very experienced eye can place it rightly. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 There is no merit in being truthful when one is truthful by nature, or rather when one can be nothing else; it is a gift, like poetry or music. But it needs courage to be truthful after carefully considering the matter, unless a kind of pride is involved; for example, the man who says to himself, "I am ugly," and then says, "I am ugly" to his friends, lest they should think themselves the first to make the discovery. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 The Natural History Museum is open to the public on Tuesdays and Fridays. Elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus; extraordinary animals! Rubens rendered them marvellously. I had a feeling of happiness as soon as I entered the place and the further I went the stronger it grew. I felt my whole being rise above commonplaces and trivialities and the petty worries of my daily life. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 I believe it safe to say that all progress must lead, not to further progress, but finally to the negation of progress, a return to the point of departure. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Commonplace people have an answer for everything and nothing ever surprises them. They try to look as though they knew what you were about to say better than you did yourself, and when it is their turn to speak, they repeat with great assurance something that they have heard other people say, as though it were their own invention. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Can any man say with certainty that he was happy at a particular moment of time which he remembers as being delightful? Remembering it certainly makes him happy, because he realizes how happy he could have been, but at the actual moment when the alleged happiness was occurring, did he really feel happy? He was like a man owning a piece of ground in which, unknown to himself, a treasure lay buried. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 The more I think about colour, the more convinced I become that this reflected half-tint is the principle that must predominate, because it is this that gives the true tone, the tone that constitutes the value, the thing that matters in giving life and character to the object. Light, to which the schools teach us to attach equal importance and which they place on the canvas at the same time as the half-tint and shadow, is really only an accident. Without grasping this principle, one cannot understand true colour, I mean the colour that gives the feeling of thickness and depth and of that essential difference that distinguishes one object from another. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Perfect beauty implies perfect simplicity, a quality that at first sight does not arouse the emotions which we feel before gigantic works, objects whose very disproportion constitutes an element of beauty. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 They say that each generation inherits from those that have gone before; if this were so there would be no limit to man's improvements or to his power of reaching perfection. But he is very far from receiving intact that storehouse of knowledge which the centuries have piled up before him; he may perfect some inventions, but in others, he lags behind the originators, and a great many inventions have been lost entirely. What he gains on the one hand, he loses on the other. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Delsarte tells me that Mozart stole outrageously from Galuppi, in the same way, I suppose, that Molière stole from anybody anywhere, if he found something work taking. I said that what was Mozart had not been stolen from Galuppi, or from anyone else for that matter. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 We should not allow ourselves to believe that writers like Poe have more imagination than those who are content with describing things as they really are. It is surely easier to invent striking situations in this way than to tread the beaten track which intelligent minds have followed throughout the centuries. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 We are told that Shakespeare's plays were generally performed in barns and that no great trouble was taken over the production. The constant changes of scene which, incidentally, seem the sign of a decadent art rather than one which is progressing, were shown by placards with the inscription: "A Forest," "A Prison," and so on. Within this conventional setting the onlooker's imagination was free to follow the actions of the various characters who were animated by passions drawn from nature, and that was enough for him. So-called innovations are gratefully seized on as an excuse for poverty of invention and in the same way, the long descriptive passages that so overburden modern novels are a sign of sterility, for it is obviously easier to describe a dress or the outward appearance of an object than to trace the subtle development of a character or portray the emotions of the heart. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 He is the least mannered and consequently the most varied of artists. Mannered talents have but one bias, one usage only. They are more apt to follow the impulse of the hand than to control it. Those that are less mannered must be more varied, for they continually respond to genuine emotion. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 In every art we are always obliged to return to the accepted means of expression, the conventional language of the art. What is a black-and-white drawing but a convention to which the beholder has become so accustomed that with his mind's eye he sees a complete equivalent in the translation from nature? 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 For his contemporaries, Racine was a romantic, but for every age he is classical, that is to say, he is faultless. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Mythological subjects always new. Modern subjects difficult because of the absence of the nude and the wretchedness of modern costume. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Painting, in the beginning, was a trade like any other. Some men became picture-makers as others became glaziers or carpenters. Painters painted shields, saddles and banners. The primitive painter was more of a craftsman than we are; he learned his trade superlatively well before he thought of letting himself go. The reverse is true today. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Curiously enough, the Sublime is generally achieved through want of proportion. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Nature creates unity even in the parts of a whole. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 The so-called conscientiousness of the great majority of painters is nothing but perfection laboriously applied to the art of being boring. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 They say that truth is naked. I cannot admit this for any but abstract truths; in the arts, all truths are produced by methods which show the hand of the artist. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Weaknesses in men of genius are usually an exaggeration of their personal feeling; in the hands of feeble imitators they become the most flagrant blunders. Entire schools have been founded on misinterpretations of certain aspects of the masters. Lamentable mistakes have resulted from the thoughtless enthusiasm with which men have sought inspiration from the worst qualities of remarkable artists because they are unable to reproduce the sublime elements in their work. 
Author: Eugène Victor Eugène Delacroix
Nationality: French
b. 26 April 1798  - d. 13 August 1863
  
 Good art is art that allows you to enter it from a variety of angles and to emerge with a variety of views. 
Author: Mary Theresa Schmich
Nationality: American
b. 29 November 1953
  
 To most Christians, the Bible is like a software license. Nobody actually reads it. They just scroll to the bottom and click 'I Agree'. 
Author: Anonymous Anonymous
Nationality: American   
 The more exactly he grasps, whether by instinct or through study, the existing element of sameness in people, the more successful is the mass-culture maker. Indeed, so deeply is he committed to the concept that men are alike that he may even fancy that there exists a kind of human dead center in which everyone is identical with everyone else, and that if he can hit that psychic bull's eye he can make all mankind twitch at once. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 At a certain moment the canvas began to appear to one American painter after another as an arena in which to act-rather than as a space in which to reproduce, re-design, analyze or express an object, actual or imagined. What was to go on the canvas was not a picture but an event. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 As with other modern artists, his readings provided not an organized outlook but a kind of metaphysical hum that surrounded his mental operations. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Abandoned by philosophy, politics, and sociology, historical determinism continues to hold out in formalist art criticism. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Abandoned by philosophy, politics, and sociology, historical determinism continues to hold out in formalist art criticism. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The aim of every authentic artist is not to conform to the history of art but to release himself from it, in order to replace it with his own history. However the historical pattern is drawn, it will not fit the developing sensibility of the individual. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Abstract art as it is conceived at present is a game bequeathed to painting and sculpture by art history. One who accepts its premises must consent to limit his imagination to a depressing casuistry regarding the formal requirements of modernism. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Only through apprehending, by means of present-day creations, how art is created, can the creations of other periods be genuinely appreciated. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The internationalization of art becomes a factor contributing to the estrangement of art from the artist. The sum of works of all times and places stands against him as an entity with objectives and values of its own. In turn, since becoming aware of the organized body of artworks as the obstacle to his own aesthetic self-affirmation, the artist is pushed toward anti-intellectualism and willful dismissal of the art of the past. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Imitation of the art of earlier centuries, as that done by Picasso and Modigliani, is carried on not to perpetuate ancient values but to demonstrate that new aesthetic orders now prevail. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 One cannot, however, avoid saying a few words about individuals who lay down the law to art in the name of art history. Art criticism today is beset by art historians turned inside out to function as prophets of so-called inevitable trends. A determinism similar to that projected into the evolution of past styles is clamped upon art in the making. In this parody of art history, value judgments are deduced from a presumed logic of development, and an ultimatum is issued to artists either to accommodate themselves to these values or be banned from the art of the future. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The mingling of object and image in collage, of given fact and conscious artifice, corresponds to the illusion-producing processes of contemporary civilization. In advertisements, news stories, films, and political campaigns, lumps of unassailable data are implanted in preconceived formats in order to make the entire fabrication credible. Documents waved at hearings by Joseph McCarthy to substantiate his fictive accusations were a version of collage, as is the corpse of Lenin, inserted by Stalin into the Moscow mausoleum to authenticate his own contrived ideology. Twentieth-century fictions are rarely made up of the whole cloth, perhaps because the public has been trained to have faith in "information." Collage is the primary formula of the aesthetics of mystification developed in our time. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Greatness in art is always a by-product. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The interval during which a painting is mistaken for the real thing, or a real thing for a painting, is the triumphant moment of trompe l'oeil art. The artist appears to be potent as nature, if not superior to it. Almost immediately, though, the spectator's uncertainty is eliminated by his recognition that the counterfeit is counterfeit. Once the illusion is dissolved, what is left is an object that is interesting not as a work of art but as a successful simulation of something that is not art. The major response to it is curiosity: "How did he do it?" 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Illusionistic art appeals to what the public knows not about art but about things. This ability to brush art aside is the secret of the popularity of illusionism. Ever since the Greeks told of painted grapes being pecked by real birds, wonder at skill in deceiving the eye has moved more people than appreciation of aesthetic quality. But for art to depend exclusively upon reproducing appearances has the disadvantage of requiring that the painting or sculpture conform to the common perception of things. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The new attitude of the critic toward the artist has been rationalized for me by a leading European art historian who is also an influential critic of current art. It is based on a theory of division of labor in making art history. The historian, he contends, knows art history and, in fact, creates it; the artist knows only how to do things. Left to himself, the artist is almost certain to do the wrong thing - to deviate from the line of art history and thus to plunge into oblivion. The critic's role is to steer him in the proper direction and advise changes in his technique and subject matter that will coordinate his efforts with the forces of development. Better still, critics should formulate historically valid projects for artists to carry out. That not all critics have the same expectations of the future of art does not, I realize, weaken the cogency of my colleague's argument. The surviving artist would be one who has been lucky enough to pick the winning critic. My own view that art should be left to artists seemed to my mentor both out-of-date and irresponsible. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Art has arrived at the paradox that tradition itself requires the occurrence of radical attacks on tradition. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 In the United States, revolts tends to be directed against specific situations, rarely against the social structure as a whole. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 If being an anti-art artist is difficult, being an anti-art art historian is a hard position indeed. His doctrinal revolutionism brings forth nothing new in art but reenacts upheavals on the symbolic plane of language. It provides the consoling belief that overthrows are occurring as in the past, that barriers to creation are being surmounted, and that art is pursuing a radical purpose, even if it is only the purpose of doing away with itself. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The current demoralization of the art world is attributable at least in part to museum interference, ideological and practical, with ongoing creation in art. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 It is not logical for art to be logical. Art goes against the grain of the times as readily as it goes with it and at the very same moment. Instead of seeking the nearest exit, art responds to a new situation by uncovering a labyrinth of problems. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The skills of the modern artist are the opposite of those of the craftsman: instead of acquiring techniques for producing classes of objects, the artist today perfects the means suited to his particular work. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Both art and the artist lack identity and define themselves only through their encounter with each other. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The artist is obliged to invent the self who will paint his pictures. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Not only the artist but everyone "becomes someone else" in becoming someone. One is thought about, thus invented. Or as Steinberg put it with memorable succinctness in his Cogito drawings, "I think, therefore Descartes is." One creates not oneself but another. Being is in the act. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Not only were the minds of artists formed by the university; in the same mold were formed those of the art historians, the critics, the curators, and the collectors by whom their work was evaluated. With the rise of Conceptual art, the classroom announced its final triumph over the studio. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 For the artist, fulfillment of self consists not in marching in the ranks of the liberators but in being entered in the roll of the Masters. The artist tends to find himself in the position of a deserter from his social group - or, at best, one who collaborates, with secret reservations. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 Exhibitions of minority art are often intended to make the minority itself more aware of its collective experience. Reinforcing the common memory of miseries and triumphs will, it is expected, strengthen the unity of the group and its determination to achieve a better future. But emphasizing shared experience as opposed to the artist's consciousness of self (which includes his personal and unshared experience of masterpieces) brings to the fore the tension in the individual artist between being an artist and being a minority artist. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
 The struggle to make an absolute statement in an individually conceived vocabulary accounts for the profound tensions inherent in the best modern work. 
Author: Harold Rosenberg
Nationality: American
b. 02 February 1906  - d. 11 July 1978
  
  He was given to fits of rage, Jewish, liberal paranoia, male chauvinism, self-righteous misanthropy, and nihilistic moods of despair. He had complaints about life, but never solutions. He longed to be an artist, but balked at the necessary sacrifices. In his most private moments, he spoke of his fear of death which he elevated to tragic heights when, in fact, it was mere narcissism. 
Author: Meryl Streep
Nationality: American
b. 22 June 1949
  
 Gentlemen, we have a master; this young man does everything, can do everything and will do everything. 
Author: Abbé Emmanuel Joseph Sieyes
Nationality: French
b. 03 March 1748  - d. 20 June 1836
  




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