Lies Quotes

 A great lie is like a great fish on dry land; it may fret and fling, and make a frightful bother, but it cannot hurt you. You have only to keep still and it will die of itself. 
Author: George Crabbe
Nationality: English
b. 24 December 1754  - d. 3 February 1832
  
 Deceivers are the most dangerous members of society. They trifle with the best parts of our nature, and violate the most sacred obligations. 
Author: George Crabbe
Nationality: English
b. 24 December 1754  - d. 3 February 1832
  
 Experience has always shown, and reason also, that affairs which depend on many seldom succeed. 
Author: Francesco Guicciardini
Nationality: Italian
b. 6 March 1483  - d. 22 May 1540
  
 Habit with him was all the test of truth, 'It must be right: I've done it from my youth'. 
Author: George Crabbe
Nationality: English
b. 24 December 1754  - d. 3 February 1832
  
 It is better for you to be free of fear lying upon a pallet, than to have a golden couch and a rich table and be full of trouble. 
Author: Epicurus
Nationality: Greek
b. December 341  - d.  December 270
  
 We have made the Reich by propaganda. 
Author: Paul Joseph Goebbels
Nationality: German
b. 29 October 1897  - d. 01 May 1945
  
 When war is declared, Truth is the first casualty. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 By a lie a man throws away and, as it were, annihilates his dignity as a man. 
Author: Immanuel Kant
Nationality: German
b. 22 April 1724  - d. 12 February 1804
  
 There is nothing sensational in the way of revelations contained in these pages. All the cases mentioned are well known to those who were in authority, less well known to those primarily affected, and unknown, unfortunately, to the millions who fell. Although only a small part of the vast field of falsehood is covered, it may suffice to show how the unsuspecting innocence of the masses in all countries was ruthlessly and systematically exploited. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 Contempt for the enemy, if illustrated, can prove to be an unwise form of falsehood. There was a time when German soldiers were popularly represented cringing, with their arms in the air and crying “Kamerad,” until it occurred to Press and propaganda authorities that people were asking why, if this was the sort of material we were fighting against, had we not wiped them off the field in a few weeks. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 In Vienna an enterprising firm supplied atrocity photographs with blanks for the headings so that they might be used for propaganda purposes by either side. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 Atrocity lies were the most popular of all, especially in this country and America; no war can be without them. Slander of the enemy is esteemed a patriotic duty. An English soldier wrote - The Times, September 15, 1914: “The stories in our papers are only exceptions. There are people like them in every army.” But at the earliest possible moment stories of the maltreatment of prisoners have to be circulated deliberately in order to prevent surrenders. This is done, of course, on both sides. Whereas naturally each side tries to treat its prisoners as well as possible so as to attract others. The repetition of a single instance of cruelty and its exaggeration can be distorted into a prevailing habit on the part of the enemy." 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 Lying, as we all know, does not take place only in war-time. Man, it has been said, is not “a veridical animal,” but his habit of lying is not nearly so extraordinary as his amazing readiness to believe. It is, indeed, because of human credulity that lies flourish. But in war-time the authoritative organization of lying is not sufficiently recognized. The deception of whole peoples is not a matter which can be lightly regarded. A useful purpose can therefore be served in the interval of so-called peace by a warning which people can examine with dispassionate calm, that the authorities in each country do, and indeed must, resort to this practice in order, first, to justify themselves by depicting the enemy as an undiluted criminal; and secondly, to inflame popular passion sufficiently to secure recruits for the continuance of the struggle. They cannot afford to tell the truth. In some cases it must be admitted that at the moment they do not know what the truth is. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 It must be admitted that many people were conscious and willing dupes. But many more were unconscious and were sincere in their patriotic zeal. Finding now that elaborately and carefully staged deceptions were practised on them, they feel a resentment which has not only served to open their eyes but may induce them to make their children keep their eyes open when next the bugle sounds. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 When war reaches such dimensions as to involve the whole nation, and when the people at its conclusion find they have gained nothing but only observe widespread calamity around them, they are inclined to become more sceptical and desire to investigate the foundations of the arguments which inspired their patriotism, inflamed their passions, and prepared them to offer the supreme sacrifice. They are curious to know why the ostensible objects for which they fought have none of them been attained, more especially if they are the victors. 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 Between nations, where the consequences are vital, where the destiny of countries and provinces hangs in the balance, the lives and fortunes of millions are affected and civilization itself is menaced, the most upright men honestly believe that there is no depth of duplicity to which they may not legitimately stoop. They have got to do it. The thing cannot go on without the help of lies. This is no plea that lies should not be used in war-time, but a demonstration of how lies must be used in war-time. If the truth were told from the outset, there would be no reason and no will for war. Anyone declaring the truth: “Whether you are right or wrong, whether you win or lose, in no circumstances can war help you or your country,” would find himself in gaol very quickly. In war-time, failure to lie is negligence, the doubting of a lie a misdemeanour, the declaration of the truth a crime. - 
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 The narrowest patriotism could be made to appear noble, the foulest accusations could be represented as an indignant outburst of humanitarianism, and the meanest and most vindictive aims falsely disguised as idealism. Everything was legitimate which could make the soldiers go on fighting.  
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 In calm retrospect we can appreciate better the disastrous effects of the poison of falsehood, whether officially, semi-officially, or privately manufactured. It has been rightly said that the injection of the poison of hatred into men’s minds by means of falsehood is a greater evil in war-time than the actual loss of life. The defilement of the human soul is worse than the destruction of the human body. A fuller realization of this is essential.  
Author: Arthur Ponsonby
Nationality: British
b. 16 February 1871  - d. 23 March 1946
  
 I looked down on a quilt of clouds, bordered on the horizon by the blood-orange streaks of the setting sun. As the steady hum of the engine drowned out the chatter around me, I realized that I would probably be thinking about the implications of Watergate for the rest of my life. For the country, and for me it had been a significant point in time. 
Author: Fred Dalton Thompson
Nationality: American
b. 19 August 1942
  
 When I was a little boy, they called me a liar, but now that I am grown up, they call me a writer. 
Author: Isaac Bashevis Singer
Nationality: American
b. 21 November 1902  - d. 24 July 1991
  
 That is of course rather painful for those involved. One should not as a rule reveal one's secrets, since one does not know if and when one may need them again. The essential English leadership secret does not depend on particular intelligence. Rather, it depends on a remarkably stupid thick-headedness. The English follow the principle that when one lies, one should lie big, and stick to it. They keep up their lies, even at the risk of looking ridiculous.  
Author: Paul Joseph Goebbels
Nationality: German
b. 29 October 1897  - d. 01 May 1945
  
 Semiotics is in principle the discipline studying everything which can be used in order to lie. If something cannot be used to tell a lie, conversely it cannot be used to tell the truth: it cannot in fact be used "to tell" at all. 
Author: Umberto Eco
Nationality: Italian
b. 05 January 1932
  
 This very singular man, born to be the most barefaced of all imposters, declared with impunity, with a casual air, that he was three hundred years old, that he possessed the universal medicine, that he made anything he liked from nature, that he created diamonds. 
Author: Giacomo Casanova
Nationality: Italian
b. 02 April 1725  - d. 04 June 1798
  
 The same principle which forbids me to lie does not allow me to tell the truth. 
Author: Giacomo Casanova
Nationality: Italian
b. 25 April 1725  - d. 04 June 1798
  
 Large firms never do work for conservatives on homosexual or abortion issues. 
Author: Andrew Layton Schlafly
Nationality: American
b. 27 April 1961
  




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