Science Quotes

 A discovery is said to be an accident meeting a prepared mind. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry. Hence University education. 
Author: George Bernard Shaw
Nationality: British
b. 28 July 1856  - d. 2 November 1950
  
 A human being is part of a whole, called by us the 'Universe,' a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest - a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life depend on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A man should look for what is, and not for what he thinks should be. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A man's ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A person starts to live when he can live outside himself. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A photograph never grows old. You and I change, people change all through the months and years, but a photograph always remains the same. How nice to look at a photograph of mother or father taken many years ago. You see them as you remember them. But as people live on, they change completely. That is why I think a photograph can be kind. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A theory can be proved by experiment; but no path leads from experiment to the birth of a theory. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A well-known scientist (some say it was Bertrand Russell) once gave a public lecture on astronomy. He described how the earth orbits around the sun and how the sun, in turn, orbits around the center of a vast collection of stars called our galaxy. At the end of the lecture a little old lady at the back of the room got up and said: 'What you have told us is rubbish. The world is really a flat plate supported on the back of a giant tortoise.' The scientist gave a superior smile before replying, 'What is the turtle standing on?' 'You're very clever, young man, very clever,' said the little old lady. 'But it's turtles all the way down.' 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 According to this conception, the sole function of education was to open the way to thinking and knowing, and the school, as the outstanding organ for the people's education, must serve that end exclusively. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 All exact science is dominated by the idea of approximation. 
Author: Bertrand Russell
Nationality: British
b. 18 May 1872  - d. 2 February 1970
  
 All meaningful and lasting change starts first in your imagination and then works its way out. Imagination is more important than knowledge. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 All my life through, the new sights of Nature made me rejoice like a child. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 All science is concerned with the relationship of cause and effect. Each scientific discovery increases man's ability to predict the consequences of his actions and thus his ability to control future events. 
Author: Dr. Laurence J. Peter
Nationality: Canadian
b. 16 September 1919  - d. 12 February 1990
  
 All such action would cease if those powerful elemental forces were to cease stirring within us.  
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 All that is valuable in human society depends upon the opportunity for development accorded the individual. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 All the mathematical sciences are founded on relations between physical laws and laws of numbers. 
Author: James Clerk Maxwell
Nationality: Scottish
b. 13 June 1931  - d. 05 November 1879
  
 All these constructions and the laws connecting them can be arrived at by the principle of looking for the mathematically simplest concepts and the link between them. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 And when did you last see your father? 
Author: W. F. Yeames
Nationality: British
b. 18 December 1835  - d. 03 May 1918
  
 And yet... it moves. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters cannot be trusted in large ones either. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Anything you don't understand, Mr. Rankin, you attribute to God. God for you is where you sweep away all the mysteries of the world, all the challenges to our intelligence. You simply turn your mind off and say 'God did it'. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 As an adolescent, I aspired to lasting fame, I craved factual certainty, and I thirsted fof a meaningful vision of human life - so I became a scientist. This is like becoming an archbishop so you can meet girls. 
Author: Matt Cartmill
Nationality: American
b. December 1943
  
 As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 As long as there are sovereign nations possessing great power, war is inevitable. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 At any rate, I am convinced that God does not play dice. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 At the same time, as social beings, we are moved in the relations with our fellow beings by such feelings as sympathy, pride, hate, need for power, pity, and so on. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Before God we are all equally wise - and equally foolish. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Beginnings are apt to be shadowy and so it is the beginnings of the great mother life, the sea. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 But their intervention makes our acts to serve ever less merely the immediate claims of our instincts 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Chemistry is a trade for people without enough imagination to be physicists. 
Author: Arthur C. Clarke
Nationality: English
b. 16 December 1917
  
 Chemistry is all about getting lucky. 
Author: Robert Curl
Nationality: English
b. 23 July 1933
  
 Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Computer: a million morons working at the speed of light. 
Author: David Ferrier
Nationality: Scottish
b. 13 January 1843  - d. 19 March 1928
  
 Concerning what ultimately becomes of the individual, evolution has added nothing and subtracted nothing. 
Author: Robert A. Millikan
Nationality: American
b. 22 March 1868  - d. 19 December 1953
  
 Confusion of goals and perfection of means seems, in my opinion, to characterize our age. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Considered logically this concept is not identical with the totality of sense impressions referred to; but it is an arbitrary creation of the human (or animal) mind. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Creating a new theory is not like destroying an old barn and erecting a skyscraper in its place. It is rather like climbing a mountain, gaining new and wider views, discovering unexpected connections between our starting points and its rich environment. But the point from which we started out still exists and can be seen, although it appears smaller and forms a tiny part of our broad view gained by the mastery of the obstacles on our adventurous way up. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Curiosity has its own reason for existence. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Degeneracy follows every autocratic system of violence, for violence inevitably attracts moral inferiors. Time has proven that illustrious tyrants are succeeded by scoundrels. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Discovery consists of looking at the same thing as everyone else does and thinking something different. 
Author: Albert Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. 16 September 1893  - d. 22 October 1986
  
 Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics. I can assure you mine are still greater. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Dressing up is inevitably a substitute for good ideas. It is no coincidence that technically inept business types are known as 'suits.' 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 During the last century, and part of the one before, it was widely held that there was an unreconcilable conflict between knowledge and belief. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 E=mc_ (Energy equals mass times the square of the speed of light.) Original statement: If a body gives off the energy L in the form of radiation, its mass diminshes by L/c_. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Each makes this cosmos and its construction the pivot of his emotional life, in order to find in this way peace and security which he can not find in the narrow whirlpool of personal experience. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Education is the progressive realization of our ignorance. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Engineering is the art or science of making practical. 
Author: Samuel C. Florman
Nationality: American   
 Every kind of peaceful cooperation among men is primarily based on mutual trust and only secondarily on institutions such as courts of justice and police. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Every minute dies a man, And one and one-sixteenth is born. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Everything is determined, the beginning as well as the end, by forces over which we have no control. It is determined for insects as well as for the stars. Human beings, vegetables or cosmic dust, we all dance to a mysterious tune, intoned in the distance by an invisible piper. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Example isn't another way to teach, it is the only way to teach. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even incapable of forming such opinions. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Firstly, gradualness. About this most important condition of fruitful scientific work I can never speak without emotion. Gradualness, gradualness, gradualness. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 For all the advances in medicine, there is still no cure for the common birthday. 
Author: John Herschel Glenn
Nationality: American
b. 18 July 1921
  
 For some days I quietly worked out in my own mind the metaphysics of Cosmic Unity. The more I thought about it, the more convinced I became that it was the living truth. It was logically incontrovertible. It provided for the first time a firm foundation for ethics. It offered mankind the radical change of heart and mind that was our only hope of peace at a time of desperate danger. Only one small problem remained. I must find a way to convert the world to my way of thinking. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 For the sense of smell, almost more than any other, has the power to recall memories and it is a pity that you use it so little. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 Formal symbolic representation of qualitative entities is doomed to its rightful place of minor significance in a world where flowers and beautiful women abound. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Generations to come will find it difficult to believe that a man such as Gandhi ever walked the face of this earth. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 God does not care about our mathematical difficulties. He integrates empirically. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 God is clever, but not dishonest. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 God is subtle but not malicious. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Good parents give their children Roots and Wings. Roots to know where home is, wings to fly away and exercise what's been taught them. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 Gradualness, gradualness, and gradualness. From the very beginning of your work, school yourself to severe gradualness in the accumulation of knowledge. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Great spirits have always encountered opposition from mediocre minds. The mediocre mind is incapable of understanding the man who refuses to bow blindly to conventional prejudices and chooses instead to express his opinions courageously and honestly. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 He who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe is as good as dead; his eyes are closed. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be a part of so base an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 How do I work? I grope. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 How on earth are you ever going to explain in terms of chemistry and physics so important a biological phenomenon as first love? 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Human beings are animals. They are sometimes monsters, sometimes magnificent, but always animals. They may prefer to think of themselves as fallen angels, but in reality they are risen apes. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 I am not important: Why is everybody making such a fuss over me? 
Author: Lise Meitner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 07 November 1878  - d. 27 October 1968
  
 I am one of those who think like Nobel, that humanity will draw more good than evil from new discoveries. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 I believe that a scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I believe that every human has a finite number of heart-beats. I don't intend to waste any of mine running around doing exercises. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 I feel that the greatest reward for doing is the opportunity to do more. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 I felt I was moving among two groups - comparable in intelligence, identical in race, not grossly different in social origin, earning about the same incomes, who had almost ceased to communicate at all. 
Author: C. P. Snow
Nationality: English
b. 15 October 1905  - d. 01 July 1980
  
 I maintain there is much more wonder in science than in pseudoscience. And in addition, to whatever measure this term has any meaning, science has the additional virtue, and it is not an inconsiderable one, of being true. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 I think computer viruses should count as life. I think it says something about human nature that the only form of life we have created so far is purely destructive. We've created life in our own image. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 I was born not knowing and have had only a little time to change that here and there. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I was taught that the way of progress is neither swift nor easy. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 I would rather walk the length of Broadway in the nude than see myself in a movie. 
Author: Lise Meitner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 07 November 1878  - d. 27 October 1968
  
 If I had influence with the good fairy who is supposed to preside over the christening of all children, I should ask that her gift to each child in the world be a sense of wonder so indestructible that it would last throughout life. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 In mathematics you don't understand things. You just get used to them. 
Author: John von Neumann
Nationality: American
b. 28 December 1903  - d. 08 February 1957
  
 It has always seemed to me extreme presumptuousness on the part of those who want to make human ability the measure of what nature can and knows how to do, since, when one comes down to it, there is not one effect in nature, no matter how small, that even the most speculative minds can fully understand. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 It is no good to try to stop knowledge from going forward. Ignorance is never better than knowledge. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 It is of interest to note that while some dolphins are reported to have learned English - up to fifty words used in correct context - no human being has been reported to have learned dolphinese. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 It shouldn't be too much of a surprise that the Internet has evolved into a force strong enough to reflect the greatest hopes and fears of those who use it. After all, it was designed to withstand nuclear war, not just the puny huffs and puffs of politicians and religious fanatics. 
Author: Denise Caruso
Nationality: American
b. December 1956
  
 Knowledge once gained casts a light beyond its own immediate boundaries. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 Mars is essentially in the same orbit... Mars is somewhat the same distance from the Sun, which is very important. We have seen pictures where there are canals, we believe, and water. If there is water, that means there is oxygen. If oxygen, that means we can breathe. 
Author: Dan Quayle
Nationality: American
b. 4 February 1947
  
 Mathematics is a game played according to certain simple rules with meaningless marks on paper. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 Mathematics is the art of giving the same name to different things. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Mathematics is the language with which God has written the universe. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 My goal is simple. It is complete understanding of the universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 My hope is that the atomic bomb will make humanity realize that one must, once and for all, be finished with war. 
Author: Lise Meitner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 07 November 1878  - d. 27 October 1968
  
 Nature does not make jumps. 
Author: Carl Linnaeus
Nationality: Swedish
b. 23 May 1707  - d.  December 1778
  
 Nerds don't just happen to dress informally. They do it too consistently. Consciously or not, they dress informally as a prophylactic measure against stupidity. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: Swedish
b. December 1964
  
 Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 Nuclear physics is much easier than tax law. It's rational and always works the same way. 
Author: Jerold Rochwald
Nationality: French   
 Perfect as the wing of a bird may be, it will never enable the bird to fly if unsupported by the air. Facts are the air of science. Without them a man of science can never rise. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Personal mastery teaches us to choose. Choosing is a courageous act: picking the results and actions which you will make into your destiny. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 Philosophers say a great deal about what is absolutely necessary for science, and it is always, so far as one can see, rather naive, and probably wrong. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Physics is becoming so unbelievably complex that it is taking longer and longer to train a physicist. It is taking so long, in fact, to train a physicist to the place where he understands the nature of physical problems that he is already too old to solve them. 
Author: Eugene Paul Wigner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 17 November 1902  - d. 01 January 1955
  
 Science is facts; just as houses are made of stones, so is science made of facts; but a pile of stones is not a house and a collection of facts is not necessarily science. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Science is not a sacred cow. Science is a horse. Don't worship it. Feed it. 
Author: Aubrey Eben
Nationality: French   
 Science is nothing but developed perception, interpreted intent, common sense rounded out and minutely articulated. 
Author: George Santayana
Nationality: Spanish
b. 16 December 1863  - d. 26 September 1952
  
 Science is the refusal to believe on the basis of hope. 
Author: C. P. Snow
Nationality: English
b. 15 October 1905  - d. 01 July 1980
  
 Science when well digested is nothing but good sense and reason. 
Author: King Stanislaus Leszczynski
Nationality: Polish
b. 20 October 1677  - d. 23 February 1766
  
 Someone told me that each equation I included in the book would halve the sales. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Sometimes we talked about the nature of the human soul and about the Cosmic Unity of souls that I had believed in so firmly when I was 15 years old. My mother did not like the phrase Cosmic Unity. It was too pretentious. She preferred to call it a world soul. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 Superstition is religion - which has grown incongruous with intelligence. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 Teachers can change lives with just the right mix of chalk and challenges. 
Author: Joyce A. Myers
Nationality: British   
 Technology is a gift of God. After the gift of life it is perhaps the greatest of God's gifts. It is the mother of civilizations, of arts and of sciences. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 The accomplice to the crime of corruption is frequently our own indifference. 
Author: Bess Myerson
Nationality: American
b. December 1924
  
 The Corridors of Power. 
Author: C. P. Snow
Nationality: English
b. 15 October 1905  - d. 01 July 1980
  
 The end of science is not to prove a theory, But to improve mankind. 
Author: Manly P. Hall
Nationality: Canadian
b. 18 March 1901  - d. 29 August 1990
  
 The fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 The most alarming of all man's assaults upon the environment is the contamination of air, earth, rivers, and sea with dangerous and even lethal materials. This pollution is for the most part irrecoverable; the chain of evil it initiates not only in the world that must support life but in living tissues is for the most part irreversible. In this now universal contamination of the environment, chemicals are the sinister and little-recognized partners of radiation in changing the very nature of the world - the very nature of its life. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 The most important thing in a programming language is the name. A language will not succeed without a good name. I have recently invented a very good name and now I am looking for a suitable language. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 The Naked Ape - i.e. Homo Sapiens. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 The next war will be fought with atom bombs and the one after that with spears. 
Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Nationality: American
b. 29 April 1893  - d. 05 January 1981
  
 The pursuit of happiness is a most ridiculous phrase; if you pursue happiness you'll never find it. 
Author: C. P. Snow
Nationality: English
b. 15 October 1905  - d. 01 July 1980
  
 The theory of evolution by cumulative natural selection is the only theory we know of that is in principle capable of explaining the existence of organized complexity. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 A good many times I have been present at gatherings of people who, by the standards of the traditional culture, are thought highly educated and who have with considerable gusto been expressing their incredulity at the illiteracy of scientists. Once or twice I have been provoked and have asked the company how many of them could describe the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The response was cold: it was also negative. Yet I was asking something which is about the scientific equivalent of: 'Have you read a work of Shakespeare's?' I now believe that if I had asked an even simpler question - such as, What do you mean by mass, or acceleration, which is the scientific equivalent of saying, 'Can you read?' - not more than one in ten of the highly educated would have felt that I was speaking the same language. So the great edifice of modern physics goes up, and the majority of the cleverest people in the western world have about as much insight into it as their Neolithic ancestors would have had. 
Author: C. P. Snow
Nationality: English
b. 15 October 1905  - d. 01 July 1980
  
 The way to do research is to attack the facts at the point of greatest astonishment. 
Author: Celia Green
Nationality: British
b. December 1935
  
 There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers.  
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 To live was to suffer; but to take the storms of life with exultation, defying the gods with joy in it all, that was the great achievement. 
Author: Katharine Susannah Prichard
Nationality: Australian
b. 04 December 1883  - d. 02 August 1969
  
 To love is to place our happiness in the happiness of another. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 We dissect nature along lines laid down by our native language. Language is not simply a reporting device for experience but a defining framework for it. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 We must, however, acknowledge that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system - with all these exalted powers - man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin. 
Author: Charles Darwin
Nationality: English
b. December 1809  - d.  December 1882
  
 We wish to find the truth, no matter where it lies. But to find the truth we need imagination and skepticism both. We will not be afraid to speculate, but we will be careful to distinguish speculation from fact. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 What did you ask at school today? 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 What do you care what other people think? 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing,that's what counts. I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 You will be able to appreciate the influence of such an Engine on the future progress of science. I live in a country which is incapable of estimating it. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 A mathematical theory is not to be considered complete until you have made it so clear that you can explain it to the first man whom you meet on the street.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 Before beginning I should put in three years of intensive study, and I haven't that much time to squander on a probable failure. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 Every mathematical discipline goes through three periods of development: the naive, the formal, and the critical.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 Galileo was no idiot. Only an idiot could believe that science requires martyrdom - that may be necessary in religion, but in time a scientific result will establish itself.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 He who seeks for methods without having a definite problem in mind seeks in the most part in vain. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 How thoroughly it is ingrained in mathematical science that every real advance goes hand in hand with the invention of sharper tools and simpler methods which, at the same time, assist in understanding earlier theories and in casting aside some more complicated developments.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 I have tried to avoid long numerical computations, thereby following Riemann's postulate that proofs should be given through ideas and not voluminous computations. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 If I were to awaken after having slept for a thousand years, my first question would be: Has the Riemann hypothesis been proven?  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 If one were to bring ten of the wisest men in the world together and ask them what was the most stupid thing in existence, they would not be able to discover anything so stupid as astrology.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 Mathematics knows no races or geographic boundaries; for mathematics, the cultural world is one country. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 No one shall expel us from the paradise that Cantor has created for us. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 No other question has ever moved so profoundly the spirit of man; no other idea has so fruitfully stimulated his intellect; yet no other concept stands in greater need of clarification than that of the infinite. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 Physics is becoming too difficult for the physicists.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 The art of doing mathematics consists in finding that special case which contains all the germs of generality. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 The further a mathematical theory is developed, the more harmoniously and uniformly does its construction proceed, and unsuspected relations are disclosed between hitherto separated branches of the science.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 The infinite! No other question has ever moved so profoundly the spirit of man. 
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 We must know. We will know.  
Author: David Hilbert
Nationality: German
b. 23 January 1862  - d. 14 February 1943
  
 As adults feign disinterest in science - children can grab hold of it to distinguish themselves. 
Author: Norman MacLeod
Nationality: Scottish
b. December 1812  - d.  December 1872
  
 Silence will save me from being wrong and foolish, but it will also deprive me of the possibility of being right. 
Author: Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky
Nationality: Russian
b. 17 June 1882  - d. 06 April 1971
  
 There's no sense in being precise when you don't even know what you're talking about. 
Author: John von Neumann
Nationality: American
b. 28 December 1903  - d. 08 February 1957
  
 It would appear that we have reached the limits of what it is possible to achieve with computer technology, although one should be careful with such statements, as they tend to sound pretty silly in 5 years. 
Author: John von Neumann
Nationality: American
b. 28 December 1903  - d. 08 February 1957
  
 I have never met a man so ignorant that I couldn't learn something from him. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 The sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 I know my corn plants intimately, and I find it a great pleasure to know them. 
Author: Barbara McClintock
Nationality: American
b. 16 June 1902  - d. 02 September 1992
  
 I never thought of stopping, and I just hated sleeping. I can't imagine having a better life. 
Author: Barbara McClintock
Nationality: American
b. 16 June 1902  - d. 02 September 1992
  
 It might seem unfair to reward a person for having so much pleasure over the years, asking the maize plant to solve specific problems and then watching its responses. 
Author: Barbara McClintock
Nationality: American
b. 16 June 1902  - d. 02 September 1992
  
 It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn't matter how smart you are. If it doesn't agree with experiment, it's wrong. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 It is in the admission of ignorance and the admission of uncertainty that there is a hope for the continuous motion of human beings in some direction that doesn't get confined, permanently blocked, as it has so many times before in various periods in the history of man. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The idea is to try to give all the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgment in one particular direction or another. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Scientific views end in awe and mystery, lost at the edge in uncertainty, but they appear to be so deep and so impressive that the theory that it is all arranged as a stage for God to watch man's struggle for good and evil seems inadequate. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The theoretical broadening which comes from having many humanities subjects on the campus is offset by the general dopiness of the people who study these things. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 There is a computer disease that anybody who works with computers knows about. It's a very serious disease and it interferes completely with the work. The trouble with computers is that you 'play' with them! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The manuals we got from IBM would show examples of programs and I knew I could do a heck of a lot better than that. So I thought I might have some talent. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 The most important thing in the kitchen is the waste paper basket and it needs to be centrally located. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 The most important thing in the programming language is the name. A language will not succeed without a good name. I have recently invented a very good name and now I am looking for a suitable language 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 We're competeing against ignorance. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 There's ways to amuse yourself while doing things and thats how I look at efficency. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 A living cell requires energy not only for all its functions, but also for the maintenance of its structure. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 Energy from the sun's rays is trapped by green plants, and converted into a bound form, invested in a chemical reaction. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 I am the son of a small and far-away nation and the other laureates have all come from different countries from all over the world and we all were equally received here with signs of sympathy. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 Investigations during the last few decades have brought hydrogen instead of carbon, and instead of CO2 water, the mother of all life, into the foreground. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 I myself was (and still am) convinced, that, with regard to basic functions, as oxidation may be regarded representative of them, there are in principle no fundamental differences between animals and plants. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 So I set out to study the oxidation system in the potato, which, if damaged, causes the plant to turn brown. I did this in the hope of discovering, through these studies, the key to the understanding of adrenal function. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 The foodstuff, carbohydrate, is essentially a packet of hydrogen, a hydrogen supplier, a hydrogen donor, and the main event during its combustion is the splitting off of hydrogen. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 Supposedly, radiant energy was used to break down carbon dioxide. On oxidation carbohydrate was again combined with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 The source of this energy is the sun's radiation. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 This highest distinction has been awarded to us by an impartial judgement, without regard of our creed, race or nationality. 
Author: Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. December 1893  - d.  December 1986
  
 It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 In much of society, research means to investigate something you do not know or understand. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 If that's there, I believe that technology will probably step up to their part of it. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 I was elated, ecstatic and extremely surprised that we were successful. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 It's a brilliant surface in that sunlight. The horizon seems quite close to you because the curvature is so much more pronounced than here on earth. It's an interesting place to be. I recommend it.  
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 I think we're going to the moon because it's in the nature of the human being to face challenges. It's by the nature of his deep inner soul. We're required to do these things just as salmon swim upstream. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 I guess we all like to be recognized not for one piece of fireworks, but for the ledger of our daily work. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 I fully expected that, by the end of the century, we would have achieved substantially more than we actually did. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 As a boy, because I was born and raised in Ohio, about 60 miles north of Dayton, the legends of the Wrights have been in my memories as long as I can remember. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Geologists have a saying - rocks remember. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Gliders, sail planes, they're wonderful flying machines. It's the closest you can come to being a bird.  
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon. July 1969 AD. We came in peace for all mankind. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Mystery creates wonder and wonder is the basis of man's desire to understand. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Our autopilot was taking us into a very large crater, about the size of a big football stadium with steep slopes on the crater, covered with very large rocks about the size of automobiles. That was not the kind of place I wanted to try to make the first landing. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Pilots take no special joy in walking. Pilots like flying.  
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn't feel like a giant. I felt very, very small. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Research is creating new knowledge. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Science has not yet mastered prophecy. We predict too much for the next year and yet far too little for the next 10. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Well, I think we tried very hard not to be overconfident, because when you get overconfident, that's when something snaps up and bites you. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 The important achievement of Apollo was demonstrating that humanity is not forever chained to this planet and our visions go rather further than that and our opportunities are unlimited. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 This is one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 The one thing I regret was that my work required an enormous amount of my time, and a lot of travel. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 We had hundreds of thousands of people all dedicated to doing the perfect job, and I think they did about as well as anyone could ever have expected. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Yeah, I wasn't chosen to be first. I was just chosen to command that flight. Circumstance put me in that particular role. That wasn't planned by anyone. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 If we look at the fact, we shall find that the great inventions of the age are not, with us at least, always produced in universities.In England, the profession of the law is that which seems to hold out the strongest attraction to talent, from the circumstance, that in it ability, coupled with exertion, even though unaided by patronage, cannot fail of obtaining reward. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 In turning from the smaller instruments in frequent use to the larger and more important machines, the economy arising from the increase of velocity becomes more striking. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 In mathematics we have long since drawn the rein, and given over a hopeless race. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 It is therefore not unreasonable to suppose that some portion of the neglect of science in England, may be attributed to the system of education we pursue. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 It will be readily admitted, that a degree conferred by an university, ought to be a pledge to the public that he who holds it possesses a certain quantity of knowledge. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 On two occasions I have been asked, 'Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?' I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Some kinds of nails, such as those used for defending the soles of coarse shoes, called hobnails, require a particular form of the head, which is made by the stroke of a die. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Perhaps it would be better for science, that all criticism should be avowed. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Surely, if knowledge is valuable, it can never be good policy in a country far wealthier than Tuscany, to allow a genius like Mr. Dalton's, to be employed in the drudgery of elementary instruction. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 A powerful attraction exists, therefore, to the promotion of a study and of duties of all others engrossing the time most completely, and which is less benefited than most others by any acquaintance with science. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 A tool is usually more simple than a machine; it is generally used with the hand, whilst a machine is frequently moved by animal or steam power. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Another contrivance for regulating the effect of machinery consists in a vane or fly, of little weight, but presenting a large surface. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 At each increase of knowledge, as well as on the contrivance of every new tool, human labour becomes abridged. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Errors using inadequate data are much less than those using no data at all. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 I am inclined to attach some importance to the new system of manufacturing; and venture to throw it out with the hope of its receiving a full discussion among those who are most interested in the subject. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Telegraphs are machines for conveying information over extensive lines with great rapidity. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 That science has long been neglected and declining in England, is not an opinion originating with me, but is shared by many, and has been expressed by higher Literatureity than mine. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 That the state of knowledge in any country will exert a directive influence on the general system of instruction adopted in it, is a principle too obvious to require investigation. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The accumulation of skill and science which has been directed to diminish the difficulty of producing manufactured goods, has not been beneficial to that country alone in which it is concentrated; distant kingdoms have participated in its advantages. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The force of vapour is another fertile source of moving power; but even in this case it cannot be maintained that power is created. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The difference between a tool and a machine is not capable of very precise distinction; nor is it necessary, in a popular explanation of those terms, to limit very strictly their acceptation.  
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The economy of human time is the next advantage of machinery in manufactures. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The fatigue produced on the muscles of the human frame does not altogether depend on the actual force employed in each effort, but partly on the frequency with which it is exerted. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The pursuit of science does not, in England, constitute a distinct profession, as it does in many other countries. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The public, who consume the new commodity or profit by the new invention, are much better judges of its merit than the government can be. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The proportion between the velocity with which men or animals move, and the weights they carry, is a matter of considerable importance, particularly in military affairs. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The half minute which we daily devote to the winding-up of our watches is an exertion of labour almost insensible; yet, by the aid of a few wheels, its effect is spread over the whole twenty-four hours. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The possessors of wealth can scarcely be indifferent to processes which, nearly or remotely have been the fertile source of their possessions. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 The public character of every public servant is legitimate subject of discussion, and his fitness or unfitness for office may be fairly canvassed by any person. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 There are few circumstances which so strongly distinguish the philosopher, as the calmness with which he can reply to criticisms he may think undeservedly severe. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 There is, however, another purpose to which academies contribute. When they consist of a limited number of persons, eminent for their knowledge, it becomes an object of ambition to be admitted on their list. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Those from whose pocket the salary is drawn, and by whose appointment the officer was made, have always a right to discuss the merits of their officers, and their modes of exercising the duties they are paid to perform. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 To those who have chosen the profession of medicine, a knowledge of chemistry, and of some branches of natural history, and, indeed, of several other departments of science, affords useful assistance. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Whenever the work is itself light, it becomes necessary, in order to economize time, to increase the velocity. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 Uniformity and steadiness in the rate at which machinery works, are essential both for its effect and its duration. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 When a mass of matter is to be removed a certain force must be expended; and upon the proper economy of this force the price of transport will depend. 
Author: Charles Babbage
Nationality: British
b. 26 December 1791  - d. 18 October 1871
  
 A time will come when men will stretch out their eyes. They should see planets like our Earth. 
Author: Sir Christopher Wren
Nationality: English
b. 20 October 1632  - d. 25 February 1723
  
 The hardest thing is to go to sleep at night, when there are so many urgent things needing to be done. A huge gap exists between what we know is possible with today's machines and what we have so far been able to finish. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 People think that computer science is the art of geniuses but the actual reality is the opposite, just many people doing things that build on each other, like a wall of mini stones. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 Premature optimization is the root of all evil - or at least most of it - in programming. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 Let us change our traditional attitude to the construction of programs. Instead of imagining that our main task is to instruct a computer what to do, let us concentrate rather on explaining to human beings what we want a computer to do. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 Science is what we understand well enough to explain to a computer. Art is everything else we do. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 If you find that you're spending almost all your time on theory, start turning some attention to practical things; it will improve your theories. If you find that you're spending almost all your time on practice, start turning some attention to theoretical things; it will improve your practice. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 In fact what I would like to see is thousands of computer scientists let loose to do whatever they want. That's what really advances the field. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 If you optimize everything, you will always be unhappy. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 I decry the current tendency to seek patents on algorithms. There are better ways to earn a living than to prevent other people from making use of one's contributions to computer science. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 God is a challenge because there is no proof of his existence and therefore the search must continue. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 Any inaccuracies in this index may be explained by the fact that it has been sorted with the help of a computer. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 An algorithm must be seen to be believed. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 A list is only as strong as its weakest link. 
Author: Donald Knuth
Nationality: American
b. 10 January 1938
  
 Alfred Nobel's discoveries are characteristic; powerful explosives can help men perform admirable tasks. They are also a means to terrible destruction in the hands of the great criminals who lead peoples to war. 
Author: Pierre Curie
Nationality: French
b. 15 May 1859  - d. 19 April 1906
  
 Is it right to probe so deeply into Nature's secrets? The question must here be raised whether it will benefit mankind, or whether the knowledge will be harmful. 
Author: Pierre Curie
Nationality: French
b. 15 May 1859  - d. 19 April 1906
  
 Radium could be very dangerous in criminal hands. 
Author: Pierre Curie
Nationality: French
b. 15 May 1859  - d. 19 April 1906
  
 It has become almost a cliche to remark that nobody boasts of ignorance of literature, but it is socially acceptable to boast ignorance of science and proudly claim incompetence in mathematics. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 But perhaps the rest of us could have separate classes in science appreciation, the wonder of science, scientific ways of thinking, and the history of scientific ideas, rather than laboratory experience. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 I am against religion because it teaches us to be satisfied with not understanding the world. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 The essence of life is statistical improbability on a colossal scale. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 The fact that life evolved out of nearly nothing, some 10 billion years after the universe evolved out of literally nothing, is a fact so staggering that I would be mad to attempt words to do it justice. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 Today the theory of evolution is about as much open to doubt as the theory that the earth goes round the sun. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 Appetite, craving for food, is a constant and powerful stimulator of the gastric glands. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 As was to be expected, the discovery of the nervous apparatus of the salivary glands immediately impelled physiologists to seek a similar apparatus in other glands lying deeper in the digestive canal. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 In this way we often had to perform very minute operations, sometimes several of them on one and the same animal. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 But man has still another powerful resource: natural science with its strictly objective methods. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Don't become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Edible substances evoke the secretion of thick, concentrated saliva. Why? The answer, obviously, is that this enables the mass of food to pass smoothly through the tube leading from the mouth into the stomach. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 From the described experiment it is clear that the mere act of eating, the food even not reaching the stomach, determines the stimulation of the gastric glands. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Finally, as the digestive canal is a complex system, a series of separate chemical laboratories, I cut the connections between them in order to investigate the course of phenomena in each particular laboratory; thus I resolved the digestive canal into several separate parts. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 In the case of the stomach, however, the nerves of the glandular cells were always severed when constructing an artificially isolated pouch and this, naturally, affected the normal work of the stomach. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 It goes without saying that the desire to accomplish the task with more confidence, to avoid wasting time and labour, and to spare our experimental animals as much as possible, made us strictly observe all the precautions taken by surgeons in respect to their patients. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Physiology has, at last, gained control over the nerves which stimulate the gastric glands and the pancreas. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Our success was mainly due to the fact that we stimulated the nerves of animals that easily stood on their own feet and were not subjected to any painful stimulus either during or immediately before stimulation of their nerves. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Our experiments not only proved the existence of a nervous apparatus in the above-mentioned glands, but also disclosed some facts clearly showing the participation of these nerves in normal activity. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 It is clear to all that the animal organism is a highly complex system consisting of an almost infinite series of parts connected both with one another and, as a total complex, with the surrounding world, with which it is in a state of equilibrium. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Only by observing this condition would the results of our work be regarded as fully conclusive and as having elucidated the normal course of the phenomena. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 It is not accidental that all phenomena of human life are dominated by the search for daily bread - the oldest link connecting all living things, man included, with the surrounding nature. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Precise knowledge of what happens to the food entering the organism must be the subject of ideal physiology, the physiology of the future. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 While you are experimenting, do not remain content with the surface of things. Don't become a mere recorder of facts, but try to penetrate the mystery of their origin 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 With each meal, when edible substances find their way into the oral cavity, thick and viscous saliva containing much mucus flows out of these glands. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 So the stimulation effected by the act of eating reaches the gastric glands by means of the nerve fibres that are contained in the vagus nerves.  
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 The digestive canal represents a tube passing through the entire organism and communicating with the external world, i.e. as it were the external surface of the body, but turned inwards and thus hidden in the organism. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Thanks to our present surgical methods in physiology we can demonstrate at any time almost all phenomena of digestion without the loss of even a single drop of blood, without a single scream from the animal undergoing the experiment. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 The gastric laboratory uses its protein ferment under an acid reaction. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 The physiologist who succeeds in penetrating deeper and deeper into the digestive canal becomes convinced that it consists of a number of chemical laboratories equipped with various mechanical devices. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Thus, the purposeful relationship of phenomena is based on the specificity of the stimuli, that correspond to similarly specific reactions. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are only accessible to our reason in their most elementary forms - it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude; in this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings and aspirations to which he clings because of their super-personal value ... regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a Divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance of those super-personal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation ... In this sense religion is the age-old endeavour of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals, and constantly to strengthen their effects. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Civilization consists in the multiplication and refinement of human wants. 
Author: Robert A. Millikan
Nationality: American
b. 22 March 1868  - d. 19 December 1953
  
 Fullness of knowledge always means some understanding of the depths of our ignorance; and that is always conducive to humility and reverence. 
Author: Robert A. Millikan
Nationality: American
b. 22 March 1868  - d. 19 December 1953
  
 My idea of an educated person is one who can converse on one subject for more than two minutes. 
Author: Robert A. Millikan
Nationality: American
b. 22 March 1868  - d. 19 December 1953
  
 Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life. 
Author: Immanuel Kant
Nationality: German
b. 22 April 1724  - d. 12 February 1804
  
 Detractors of corruptibility deserve being turned into statues. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 I have for many years been a partisan of the Copernican view because it reveals to me the causes of many natural phenomena that are entirely incomprehensible in the light of the generally accepted hypothesis. To refute the latter I have collected many proofs, but I do not publish them, because I am deterred by the fate of our teacher Copernicus who, although he had won immortal fame with a few, was ridiculed and condemned by countless people - for very great is the number of the stupid. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 After the publication of my dialogues, I was summoned to Rome by the Congregation of the holy Office, where, being arrived on the 10th of February 1633, I was subjected to the infinite clemency of that tribunal, and of the Sovereign Pontiff, Urban the Eighth; who, notwithstanding, thought me deserving of his esteem. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 I was obliged to retract, like a good Catholic, this opinion of mine; and as a punishment my dialogue was prohibited; and after five months being dismissed from Rome (at the time that the city of Florence was infected with plague), the habitation which with generous pity was assigned to me, was that of the dearest friend I had in Siena, Monsignor the Archbishop Piccolomini, whose most agreeable conversation I enjoyed with such quite and satisfaction of mind, that having there resumed my studies, I discovered and demonstrated a great number on the mechanical conclusions on the resistance of solids...after about five months, the pestilence having ceased, the confinement of that house was changed by His Holiness for the freedom of the country so agreeable to me, whence I returned to the villa of Bellosguardo, and afterwards to Arcetri, where I still breathe salubrious air near my dear native-country Florence. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 Whence do you have it that the terrestrial globe is so heavy? For my part, either I do not know what heaviness is, or the terrestrial globe is neither heavy nor light, as likewise all other globes of the universe. Heaviness to me (and I believe to Nature) is that innate tendency by which a body resists being moved from its natural place and by which, when forcibly removed therefrom, it spontaneously returns there. Thus a bucketful of water raised on high and set free, returns to the sea; but who will say that the same water remains heavy in the sea, when being set free there, does not move? 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 It now remains that we find the amount of time of descent through the channel. This we shall obtain from the marvelous property of the pendulum, which is that it makes all its vibrations, large or small, in equal times. This requires, once and for all, that two or three or four patient and curious friends, having noted a fixed star that stands against some fixed marker, taking a pendulum of any length, shall go counting its vibrations during the whole time of return of the fixed star to its original point, and this will be the number of vibrations in 24 hours. From the number of these we can find the number of vibrations of any other pendulums, longer or shorter, at will, so that if for example those counted by us in 24 hours were 234,567, then taking another shorter pendulum with which one counts 800 vibrations while another counts 150 of the longer pendulum, we already have, by the golden rule, the number of vibrations for the whole time of 24 hours; and if we want to know the time of descent through the channel, we can easily find not only the minutes, seconds, and sixtieths of seconds, but beyond that as we please. It is true that we can pass a more exact measure by having observed the flow of water through a thin passage, for by collecting this and having weighed what passes in one minute, for example, then by weighing what passes in the time of descent through the channel we can find the most exact measure and quantity of this time, especially by making use of a balance so precise as to weigh one sixtieth of a grain. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 If I shall have sufficient strength to improve and amplify what was written and published by me up to now about motion by adding some little speculations, and in particular those relating to the force of percussion, in the investigation of which I have consumed hundreds and thousands of hours, and finally reduced this to very easy explanation, so that people can understand it in less than half an hour of time. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 Alas! Your dear friend and servant Galileo has been for the last month hopelessly blind; so that this heaven, this earth, this universe, which I by my marvelous discoveries and clear demonstrations had enlarged a hundred thousand times beyond the belief of the wise men of bygone ages, henceforward for me is shrunk into such a small space as is filled by my own bodily sensations. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 See now the power of truth; the same experiment which at first glance seemed to show one thing, when more carefully examined, assures us of the contrary. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 If you could see the earth illuminated when you were in a place as dark as night, it would look to you more splendid than the moon. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 In questions of science the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 My dear Kepler, what would you say of the learned here, who, replete with the pertinacity of the asp, have steadfastly refused to cast a glance through the telescope? What shall we make of this? Shall we laugh, or shall we cry? 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 Names and attributes must be accommodated to the essence of things, and not the essence to the names, since things come first and names afterwards. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 Philosophy is written in this grand book - I mean the universe - which stands continually open to our gaze, but it cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometric figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering about in a dark labyrinth. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 The great book of nature is written in mathematical symbols. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 The Bible tells us how to go to the heavens, not how the heavens go. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 What has philosophy got to do with measuring anything? 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 You cannot teach a man anything, you can only help him to find it for himself. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 Surely, God could have caused birds to fly with their bones made of solid gold, with their veins full of quicksilver, with their flesh heavier than lead, and with their wings exceedingly small. He did not, and that ought to show something. It is only in order to shield your ignorance that you put the Lord at every turn to the refuge of a miracle. 
Author: Galileo Galilei
Nationality: Italian
b. 15 February 1564  - d. 8 January 1642
  
 One never notices what has been done; one can only see what remains to be done. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 We must not forget that when radium was discovered no one knew that it would prove useful in hospitals. The work was one of pure science. And this is a proof that scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium a benefit for humanity. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career. Well, it has not been easy. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 I have no dress except the one I wear every day. If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 In science, we must be interested in things, not in persons. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 The various reasons we have just enumerated lead us to believe that the new radioactive substance contains a new element to which we propose to give the name of RADIUM. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 Science is essentially international, and it is only through lack of the historical sense that national qualities have been attributed to it. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 There are sadistic scientists who hurry to hunt down errors instead of establishing the truth. 
Author: Marie Curie
Nationality: French
b. 7 November 1867  - d. 4 July 1934
  
 Ever since I was a little boy, I dreamed I would do something important in aviation. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 I want Carl Sagan to explain the sky to me. 
Author: Whoopi Goldberg
Nationality: American
b. 13 November 1955
  
 For me the Jewish religion like all others is an incarnation of the most childish superstitions. And the Jewish people to whom I gladly belong and with whose mentality I have a deep affinity have no different quality for me than all other people. As far as my experience goes, they are no better than other human groups, although they are protected from the worst cancers by a lack of power. Otherwise I cannot see anything 'chosen' about them. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Most of the research which is done is determined by the requirement that it shall, in a fairly obvious and predictable way, reinforce the approved or fashionable theories. 
Author: Celia Green
Nationality: British
b. December 1935
  
 What sorrow was, thou bad'st her know, And from her own she learned to melt at others' woe. 
Author: Thomas Gray
Nationality: English
b. 26 December 1716  - d. 30 July 1771
  
 In glittering arms and glory dressed, High he rears his ruby crest. There the thundering strokes begin, There the press and there the din; Talymalfra's rocky shore Echoing to the battle's roar. 
Author: Thomas Gray
Nationality: English
b. 26 December 1716  - d. 30 July 1771
  
 Research is to see what everybody else has seen, and to think what nobody else has thought. 
Author: Albert Szent-Gyorgyi
Nationality: American
b. 16 September 1893  - d. 22 October 1986
  
 Everyone should be respected as an individual, but no one idolized. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 The Euclidean path integral over all topologically trivial metrics can be done by time slicing and so is unitary when analytically continued to the Lorentzian. On the other hand, the path integral over all topologically non-trivial metrics is asymptotically independent of the initial state. Thus the total path integral is unitary and information is not lost in the formation and evaporation of black holes. The way the information gets out seems to be that a true event horizon never forms, just an apparent horizon. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 This was a form of insurance policy for me. I have done a lot of work on black holes, and it would all be wasted if it turned out that black holes do not exist. But in that case, I would have the consolation of winning my bet, which would win me four years of the magazine Private Eye. If black holes do exist, Kip will get one year of Penthouse. When we made the bet in 1975, we were 80% certain that Cygnus was a black hole. By now, I would say that we are about 95% certain, but the bet has yet to be settled. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Many people have asked me why I am taking this flight. I am doing it for many reasons. First of all, I believe that life on Earth is at an ever-increasing risk of being wiped out by a disaster such as sudden nuclear war, a genetically engineered virus, or other dangers. I think the human race has no future if it doesn't go into space. I therefore want to encourage public interest in space. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 I wouldn't be here today if it were not for the NHS. I have received a large amount of high-quality treatment without which I would not have survived. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Even if there is only one possible unified theory, it is just a set of rules and equations. What is it that breathes fire into the equations and makes a universe for them to describe? 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 God not only plays dice, He also sometimes throws the dice where they cannot be seen. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 I have noticed even people who claim everything is predestined, and that we can do nothing to change it, look before they cross the road. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 If we do discover a complete theory, it should be in time understandable in broad principle by everyone. Then we shall all, philosophers, scientists, and just ordinary people be able to take part in the discussion of why we and the universe exist. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 It is no good getting furious if you get stuck. What I do is keep thinking about the problem but work on something else. Sometimes it is years before I see the way forward. In the case of information loss and black holes, it was 29 years. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 It is not clear that intelligence has any long-term survival value. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Most sets of values would give rise to universes that, although they might be very beautiful, would contain no one able to wonder at that beauty. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 One cannot really argue with a mathematical theorem. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 The usual approach of science of constructing a mathematical model cannot answer the questions of why there should be a universe for the model to describe. Why does the universe go to all the bother of existing? 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 The whole history of science has been the gradual realization that events do not happen in an arbitrary manner, but that they reflect a certain underlying order, which may or may not be divinely inspired. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 There are grounds for cautious optimism that we may now be near the end of the search for the ultimate laws of nature. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 To confine our attention to terrestrial matters would be to limit the human spirit. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 The Sun-Paul must consider only one thing: what is the relation of this or that external reaction of the animal to the phenomena of the external world? 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Mankind will possess incalculable advantages and extraordinary control over human behavior when the scientific investigator will be able to subject his fellow men to the same external analysis he would employ for any natural object, and when the human mind will contemplate itself not from within but from without. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Learn the ABC of science before you try to ascend to its summit. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 Learn, compare, collect the facts!. 
Author: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov
Nationality: Russian
b. 14 September 1849  - d. 27 February 1936
  
 The idea that God is an oversized white male with a flowing beard, who sits in the sky and tallies the fall of every sparrow is ludicrous. But if by "God" one means the set of physical laws that govern the universe, then clearly there is such a God. This God is emotionally unsatisfying ... it does not make much sense to pray to the law of gravity. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 Some people think God is an outsized, light-skinned male with a long white beard, sitting on a throne somewhere up there in the sky, busily tallying the fall of every sparrow. Others - for example Baruch Spinoza and Albert Einstein - considered God to be essentially the sum total of the physical laws which describe the universe. I do not know of any compelling evidence for anthropomorphic patriarchs controlling human destiny from some hidden celestial vantage point, but it would be madness to deny the existence of physical laws. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 An atheist has to know a lot more than I know. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 If there is life on Mars, then I believe we should do nothing to disturb that life. Mars, then, belongs to the Martians, even if they are microbes. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 Science, my lad, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.  
Author: Jules Gabriel Verne
Nationality: French
b. 08 February 1828  - d. 24 March 1905
  
 We may brave human laws, but we cannot resist natural ones. 
Author: Jules Gabriel Verne
Nationality: French
b. 08 February 1828  - d. 24 March 1905
  
 You can't say A is made of B or vice versa. All mass is interaction. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 It doesn't seem to me that this fantastically marvelous universe, this tremendous range of time and space and different kinds of animals, and all the different planets, and all these atoms with all their motions, and so on, all this complicated thing can merely be a stage so that God can watch human beings struggle for good and evil - which is the view that religion has. The stage is too big for the drama. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Some years ago I had a conversation with a layman about flying saucers - because I am scientific I know all about flying saucers! I said "I don't think there are flying saucers'. So my antagonist said, "Is it impossible that there are flying saucers? Can you prove that it's impossible?" "No", I said, "I can't prove it's impossible. It's just very unlikely". At that he said, "You are very unscientific. If you can't prove it impossible then how can you say that it's unlikely?" But that is the way that is scientific. It is scientific only to say what is more likely and what less likely, and not to be proving all the time the possible and impossible. To define what I mean, I might have said to him, "Listen, I mean that from my knowledge of the world that I see around me, I think that it is much more likely that the reports of flying saucers are the results of the known irrational characteristics of terrestrial intelligence than of the unknown rational efforts of extra-terrestrial intelligence." It is just more likely. That is all. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 On the infrequent occasions when I have been called upon in a formal place to play the bongo drums, the introducer never seems to find it necessary to mention that I also do theoretical physics. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 To those who do not know mathematics it is difficult to get across a real feeling as to the beauty, the deepest beauty, of nature ... If you want to learn about nature, to appreciate nature, it is necessary to understand the language that she speaks in.  
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Our imagination is stretched to the utmost, not, as in fiction, to imagine things which are not really there, but just to comprehend those things which are there. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possibly avoid it, "But how can it be like that?" because you will get "down the drain," into a blind alley from which nobody has yet escaped. Nobody knows how it can be like that. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 On the contrary, it's because someone knows something about it that we can't talk about physics. It's the things that nobody knows about that we can discuss. We can talk about the weather; we can talk about social problems; we can talk about psychology; we can talk about international finance... so it's the subject that nobody knows anything about that we can all talk about! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The chance is high that the truth lies in the fashionable direction. But, on the off chance that it is in another direction - a direction obvious from an unfashionable view of field theory - who will find it? Only someone who has sacrificed himself by teaching himself quantum electrodynamics from a peculiar and unfashionable point of view; one that he may have to invent for himself. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The worthwhile problems are the ones you can really solve or help solve, the ones you can really contribute something to. No problem is too small or too trivial if we can really do something about it. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 You say you are a nameless man. You are not to your wife and to your child. You will not long remain so to your immediate colleagues if you can answer their simple questions when they come into your office. You are not nameless to me. Do not remain nameless to yourself - it is too sad a way to be. Know your place in the world and evaluate yourself fairly, not in terms of the naïve ideals of your own youth, nor in terms of what you erroneously imagine your teacher's ideals are. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 You can know the name of a bird in all the languages of the world, but when you're finished, you'll know absolutely nothing whatever about the bird... So let's look at the bird and see what it's doing - that's what counts. I learned very early the difference between knowing the name of something and knowing something. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 There is one feature I notice that is generally missing in "cargo cult science". It's a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty - a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you're doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid - not only what you think is right about it. Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 All experiments in psychology are not of this cargo cult type, however. For example there have been many experiments running rats through all kinds of mazes, and so on - with little clear result. But in 1937 a man named Young did a very interesting one. He had a long corridor with doors all along one side where the rats came in, and doors along the other side where the food was. He wanted to see if he could train rats to go to the third door down from wherever he started them off. No. The rats went immediately to the door where the food had been the time before. The question was, how did the rats know, because the corridor was so beautifully built and so uniform, that this was the same door as before? Obviously there was something about the door that was different from the other doors. So he painted the doors very carefully, arranging the textures on the faces of the doors exactly the same. Still the rats could tell. Then he thought maybe they were smelling the food, so he used chemicals to change the smell after each run. Still the rats could tell. Then he realized the rats might be able to tell by seeing the lights and the arrangement in the laboratory like any commonsense person. So he covered the corridor, and still the rats could tell He finally found that they could tell by the way the floor sounded when they ran over it. And he could only fix that by putting his corridor in sand. So he covered one after another of all possible clues and finally was able to fool the rats so that they had to learn to go to the third door. If he relaxed any of his conditions, the rats could tell. Now, from a scientific standpoint, that is an A-number-one experiment. That is the experiment that makes rat-running experiments sensible, because it uncovers the clues that the rat is really using - not what you think it's using. And that is the experiment that tells exactly what conditions you have to use in order to be careful and control everything in an experiment with rat-running. I looked into the subsequent history of this research. The next experiment, and the one after that, never referred to Mr. Young. They never used any of his criteria of putting the corridor on sand, or of being very careful. They just went right on running rats in the same old way, and paid no attention to the great discoveries of Mr. Young, and his papers are not referred to, because he didn't discover anything about rats. In fact, he discovered all the things you have to do to discover something about rats. But not paying attention to experiments like that is a characteristic of cargo cult science. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 If I could explain it to the average person, I wouldn't have been worth the Nobel Prize. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I took this stuff I got out of your [O-ring] seal and I put it in ice water, and I discovered that when you put some pressure on it for a while and then undo it it doesn't stretch back. It stays the same dimension. In other words, for a few seconds at least, and more seconds than that, there is no resilience in this particular material when it is at a temperature of 32 degrees. I believe that has some significance for our problem. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 When playing Russian roulette the fact that the first shot got off safely is little comfort for the next. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Tell your son to stop trying to fill your head with science - for to fill your heart with love is enough. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The Quantum Universe has a quotation from me in every chapter - but it's a damn good book anyway. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Anyway, I have to argue about flying saucers on the beach with people, you know. And I was interested in this: they keep arguing that it is possible. And that's true. It is possible. They do not appreciate that the problem is not to demonstrate whether it's possible or not but whether it's going on or not. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 A poet once said "The whole universe is in a glass of wine." We will probably never know in what sense he meant that, for poets do not write to be understood. But it is true that if we look at a glass closely enough we see the entire universe. There are the things of physics: the twisting liquid which evaporates depending on the wind and weather, the reflections in the glass, and our imaginations adds the atoms. The glass is a distillation of the Earth's rocks, and in its composition we see the secret of the universe's age, and the evolution of the stars. What strange array of chemicals are there in the wine? How did they come to be? There are the ferments, the enzymes, the substrates, and the products. There in wine is found the great generalization: all life is fermentation. Nobody can discover the chemistry of wine without discovering, as did Louis Pasteur, the cause of much disease. How vivid is the claret, pressing its existence into the consciousness that watches it! If our small minds, for some convenience, divide this glass of wine, this universe, into parts - physics, biology, geology, astronomy, psychology, and so on - remember that Nature does not know it! So let us put it all back together, not forgetting ultimately what it is for. Let it give us one more final pleasure: drink it and forget it all! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 God was invented to explain mystery. God is always invented to explain those things that you do not understand. Now, when you finally discover how something works, you get some laws which you're taking away from God; you don't need him anymore. But you need him for the other mysteries. So therefore you leave him to create the universe because we haven't figured that out yet; you need him for understanding those things which you don't believe the laws will explain, such as consciousness, or why you only live to a certain length of time - life and death - stuff like that. God is always associated with those things that you do not understand. Therefore I don't think that the laws can be considered to be like God because they have been figured out. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 What I cannot create, I do not understand. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 We scientists are clever - too clever - are you not satisfied? Is four square miles in one bomb not enough? Men are still thinking. Just tell us how big you want it. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I have approximate answers and possible beliefs in different degrees of certainty about different things, but I'm not absolutely sure of anything, and of many things I don't know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask 'why are we here?'... and what the question might mean. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I'd hate to die twice. It's so boring. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 A great deal more is known than has been proved. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Each piece, or part, of the whole nature is always an approximation to the complete truth, or the complete truth so far as we know it. In fact, everything we know is only some kind of approximation, because we know that we do not know all the laws as yet. Therefore, things must be learned only to be unlearned again or, more likely, to be corrected. The test of all knowledge is experiment. Experiment is the sole judge of scientific “truth”. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 It is important to realize that in physics today, we have no knowledge what energy is. We do not have a picture that energy comes in little blobs of a definite amount. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 We can't define anything precisely. If we attempt to, we get into that paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers, one saying to the other: "you don't know what you are talking about!". The second one says: "what do you mean by talking? What do you mean by you? What do you mean by know?" 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 From a long view of the history of mankind - seen from, say, ten thousand years from now, there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 In fact, the science of thermodynamics began with an analysis, by the great engineer Sadi Carnot, of the problem of how to build the best and most efficient engine, and this constitutes one of the few famous cases in which engineering has contributed to fundamental physical theory. Another example that comes to mind is the more recent analysis of information theory by Claude Shannon. These two analyses, incidentally, turn out to be closely related. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 If, in some cataclysm, all scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence passed on to the next generation of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words? I believe it is the atomic hypothesis (or atomic fact, or whatever you wish to call it) that all things are made of atoms - little particles that move around in perpetual motion, attracting each other when they are a little distance apart, but repelling upon being squeezed into one another. In that one sentence you will see an enormous amount of information about the world, if just a little imagination and thinking are applied. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Poets say science takes away from the beauty of the stars - mere globs of gas atoms. Nothing is "mere". I too can see the stars on a desert night, and feel them. But do I see less or more? The vastness of the heavens stretches my imagination - stuck on this carousel my little eye can catch one-million-year-old light. A vast pattern - of which I am a part. What is the pattern or the meaning or the why? It does not do harm to the mystery to know a little more about it. For far more marvelous is the truth than any artists of the past imagined it. Why do the poets of the present not speak of it? What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent? 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 So, ultimately, in order to understand nature it may be necessary to have a deeper understanding of mathematical relationships. But the real reason is that the subject is enjoyable, and although we humans cut nature up in different ways, and we have different courses in different departments, such compartmentalization is really artificial, and we should take our intellectual pleasures where we find them. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The "paradox" is only a conflict between reality and your feeling of what reality "ought to be." 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 And you will find someday that, after all, it isn’t as horrible as it looks. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 For those who want some proof that physicists are human, the proof is in the idiocy of all the different units which they use for measuring energy. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The next question was - what makes planets go around the sun? At the time of Kepler some people answered this problem by saying that there were angels behind them beating their wings and pushing the planets around an orbit. As you will see, the answer is not very far from the truth. The only difference is that the angels sit in a different direction and their wings push inward. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so that each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 People are always asking for the latest developments in the unification of this theory with that theory, and they don't give us a chance to tell them anything about what we know pretty well. They always want to know the things we don't know. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 You will have to brace yourselves for this - not because it is difficult to understand, but because it is absolutely ridiculous: All we do is draw little arrows on a piece of paper - that’s all! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 It has been a mystery ever since it was discovered more than fifty years ago, and all good theoretical physicists put this number up on their wall and worry about it. Immediately you would like to know where this number for a coupling comes from: is it related to ? or perhaps to the base of natural logarithms? Nobody knows. It's one of the greatest damn mysteries of physics: a magic number that comes to us with no understanding by man. You might say the "hand of God" wrote that number, and "we don't know how He pushed his pencil." We know what kind of a dance to do experimentally to measure this number very accurately, but we don't know what kind of dance to do on the computer to make this number come out, without putting it in secretly! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I don't know what's the matter with people: they don't learn by understanding, they learn by some other way - by rote or something. Their knowledge is so fragile! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 And this is medicine? 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I returned to civilization shortly after that and went to Cornell to teach, and my first impression was a very strange one. I can't understand it any more, but I felt very strongly then. I sat in a restaurant in New York, for example, and I looked out at the buildings and I began to think, you know, about how much the radius of the Hiroshima bomb damage was and so forth... How far from here was 34th street?... All those buildings, all smashed - and so on. And I would see people building a bridge, or they'd be making a new road, and I thought, they're crazy, they just don't understand, they don't understand. Why are they making new things? It's so useless. But, fortunately, it's been useless for almost forty years now, hasn't it? So I've been wrong about it being useless making bridges and I'm glad those other people had the sense to go ahead. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 One time I was in the men's room of the bar and there was a guy at the urinal. He was kind of drunk, and said to me in a mean-sounding voice, "I don't like your face. I think I'll push it in." I was scared green. I replied in an equally mean voice, "Get out of my way, or I'll pee right through ya!" 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I have to understand the world, you see. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Since then I never pay attention to anything by "experts". I calculate everything myself. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I'll never make that mistake again, reading the experts' opinions. Of course, you only live one life, and you make all your mistakes, and learn what not to do, and that's the end of you. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 While in Kyoto I tried to learn Japanese with a vengeance. I worked much harder at it, and got to a point where I could go around in taxis and do things. I took lessons from a Japanese man every day for an hour. One day he was teaching me the word for "see." "All right," he said. "You want to say, 'May I see your garden?' What do you say?" I made up a sentence with the word that I had just learned. "No, no!" he said. "When you say to someone, 'Would you like to see my garden? you use the first 'see.' But when you want to see someone else's garden, you must use another 'see,' which is more polite." "Would you like to glance at my lousy garden?" is essentially what you're saying in the first case, but when you want to look at the other fella's garden, you have to say something like, "May I observe your gorgeous garden?" So there's two different words you have to use. Then he gave me another one: "You go to a temple, and you want to look at the gardens..." I made up a sentence, this time with the polite "see." "No, no!" he said. "In the temple, the gardens are much more elegant. So you have to say something that would be equivalent to 'May I hang my eyes on your most exquisite gardens?" Three or four different words for one idea, because when I'm doing it, it's miserable; when you're doing it, it's elegant. I was learning Japanese mainly for technical things, so I decided to check if this same problem existed among the scientists. At the institute the next day, I said to the guys in the office, "How would I say in Japanese, 'I solve the Dirac Equation'?" They said such-and-so. "OK. Now I want to say, 'Would you solve the Dirac Equation?' - how do I say that?" "Well, you have to use a different word for 'solve,' " they say. "Why?" I protested. "When I solve it, I do the same damn thing as when you solve it!" "Well, yes, but it's a different word - it's more polite." I gave up. I decided that wasn't the language for me, and stopped learning Japanese. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I have a friend who's an artist, and he sometimes takes a view which I don't agree with. He'll hold up a flower and say, "Look how beautiful it is," and I'll agree. But then he'll say, "I, as an artist, can see how beautiful a flower is. But you, as a scientist, take it all apart and it becomes dull." I think he's kind of nutty. There are all kinds of interesting questions that come from a knowledge of science, which only adds to the excitement and mystery and awe of a flower. It only adds. I don't understand how it subtracts. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Doubting the great Descartes was a reaction I learned from my father: Have no respect whatsoever for authority; forget who said it and instead look what he starts with, where he ends up, and ask yourself, "Is it reasonable?". 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 In particular, she had a wonderful sense of humor, and I learned from her that the highest forms of understanding we can achieve are laughter and human compassion. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The scientist has a lot of experience with ignorance and doubt and uncertainty, and this experience is of very great importance, I think. When a scientist doesn’t know the answer to a problem, he is ignorant. When he has a hunch as to what the result is, he is uncertain. And when he is pretty damn sure of what the result is going to be, he is still in some doubt. We have found it of paramount importance that in order to progress, we must recognize our ignorance and leave room for doubt. Scientific knowledge is a body of statements of varying degrees of certainty - some most unsure, some nearly sure, but none absolutely certain. Now, we scientists are used to this, and we take it for granted that it is perfectly consistent to be unsure, that it is possible to live and not know. But I don’t know whether everyone realizes this is true. Our freedom to doubt was born out of a struggle against authority in the early days of science. It was a very deep and strong struggle: permit us to question — to doubt — to not be sure. I think that it is important that we do not forget this struggle and thus perhaps lose what we have gained. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 There are the rushing waves... mountains of molecules, each stupidly minding its own business... trillions apart ...yet forming white surf in unison. Ages on ages... before any eyes could see... year after year... thunderously pounding the shore as now. For whom, for what? ...on a dead planet with no life to entertain. Never at rest... tortured by energy... wasted prodigiously by the sun... poured into space. A mite makes the sea roar. Deep in the sea, all molecules repeat the patterns of another till complex new ones are formed. They make others like themselves... and a new dance starts. Growing in size and complexity... living things, masses of atoms, DNA, protein... dancing a pattern ever more intricate. Out of the cradle onto dry land... here it is standing... atoms with consciousness ...matter with curiosity. Stands at the sea... wonders at wondering... I... a universe of atoms... an atom in the universe. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Is no one inspired by our present picture of the universe? This value of science remains unsung by singers, you are reduced to hearing not a song or poem, but an evening lecture about it. This is not yet a scientific age. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The only way to have real success in science, the field I’m familiar with, is to describe the evidence very carefully without regard to the way you feel it should be. If you have a theory, you must try to explain what’s good and what’s bad about it equally. In science, you learn a kind of standard integrity and honesty. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Some people say, "How can you live without knowing?" I do not know what they mean. I always live without knowing. That is easy. How you get to know is what I want to know. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 It's a great game to look at the past, at an unscientific era, look at something there, and say have we got the same thing now, and where is it? So I would like to amuse myself with this game. First, we take witch doctors. The witch doctor says he knows how to cure. There are spirits inside which are trying to get out. ... Put a snakeskin on and take quinine from the bark of a tree. The quinine works. He doesn't know he's got the wrong theory of what happens. If I'm in the tribe and I'm sick, I go to the witch doctor. He knows more about it than anyone else. But I keep trying to tell him he doesn't know what he's doing and that someday when people investigate the thing freely and get free of all his complicated ideas they'll learn much better ways of doing it. Who are the witch doctors? Psychoanalysts and psychiatrists, of course. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The third aspect of my subject is that of science as a method of finding things out. This method is based on the principle that observation is the judge of whether something is so or not. All other aspects and characteristics of science can be understood directly when we understand that observation is the ultimate and final judge of the truth of an idea. But "prove" used in this way really means "test," in the same way that a hundred-proof alcohol is a test of the alcohol, and for people today the idea really should be translated as, "The exception tests the rule." Or, put another way, "The exception proves that the rule is wrong." That is the principle of science. If there is an exception to any rule, and if it can be proved by observation, that rule is wrong. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 No government has the right to decide on the truth of scientific principles, nor to prescribe in any way the character of the questions investigated. Neither may a government determine the aesthetic value of artistic creations, nor limit the forms of literacy or artistic expression. Nor should it pronounce on the validity of economic, historic, religious, or philosophical doctrines. Instead it has a duty to its citizens to maintain the freedom, to let those citizens contribute to the further adventure and the development of the human race. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The first ... has to do with whether a man knows what he is talking about, whether what he says has some basis or not. And my trick that I use is very easy. If you ask him intelligent questions — then he quickly gets stuck. It is like a child asking naive questions. If you ask naive but relevant questions, then almost immediately the person doesn't know the answer, if he is an honest man. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Looking back at the worst times, it always seems that they were times in which there were people who believed with absolute faith and absolute dogmatism in something. And they were so serious in this matter that they insisted that the rest of the world agree with them. And then they would do things that were directly inconsistent with their own beliefs in order to maintain that what they said was true. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The fact that you are not sure means that it is possible that there is another way someday. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 If the professors of English will complain to me that the students who come to the universities, after all those years of study, still cannot spell "friend," I say to them that something's the matter with the way you spell friend. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I can live with doubt, and uncertainty, and not knowing. I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. I have approximate answers, and possible beliefs, and different degrees of certainty about different things, but I’m not absolutely sure of anything, and in many things I don’t know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask why we’re here, and what the question might mean. I might think about a little, but if I can’t figure it out, then I go to something else. But I don’t have to know an answer. I don’t feel frightened by not knowing things, by being lost in a mysterious universe without having any purpose, which is the way it really is, as far as I can tell, possibly. It doesn’t frighten me. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Science alone of all the subjects contains within itself the lesson of the danger of belief in the infallibility of the greatest teachers in the preceding generation. Learn from science that you must doubt the experts. As a matter of fact, I can also define science another way: Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The remark which I read somewhere, that science is all right as long as it doesn't attack religion, was the clue I needed to understand the problem. As long as it doesn't attack religion it need not be paid attention to and nobody has to learn anything. So it can be cut off from society except for its applications, and thus be isolated. And then we have this terrible struggle to try to explain things to people who have no reason to want to know. But if they want to defend their own point of view, they will have to learn what yours is a little bit. So I suggest, maybe correctly and perhaps wrongly, that we are too polite. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 We absolutely must leave room for doubt or there is no progress and no learning. There is no learning without having to pose a question. And a question requires doubt. People search for certainty. But there is no certainty. People are terrified—how can you live and not know? It is not odd at all. You only think you know, as a matter of fact. And most of your actions are based on incomplete knowledge and you really don't know what it is all about, or what the purpose of the world is, or know a great deal of other things. It is possible to live and not know. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I don't know anything, but I do know that everything is interesting if you go into it deeply enough. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Science is what we have learned about how not to fool ourselves about the way the world is. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 All fundamental processes are reversible. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Einstein was a giant. His head was in the clouds, but his feet were on the ground. Those of us who are not so tall have to choose! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Don't worry about anything... Go out and have a good time. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I cannot define the real problem, therefore I suspect there's no real problem, but I'm not sure there's no real problem. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 If you can't explain something to a first year student, then you haven't really understood it. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Mathematics is not real, but it feels real. Where is this place? 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 People say to me, "Are you looking for the ultimate laws of physics?" No, I'm not. If it turns out there is a simple ultimate law which explains everything, so be it - that would be very nice to discover. If it turns out it's like an onion with millions of layers, then that's the way it is. But either way there's Nature and she's going to come out the way She is. So therefore when we go to investigate we shouldn't predecide what it is we're looking for only to find out more about it. Now you ask: "Why do you try to find out more about it?" If you began your investigation to get an answer to some deep philosophical question, you may be wrong. It may be that you can't get an answer to that particular question just by finding out more about the character of Nature. But that's not my interest in science; my interest in science is to simply find out about the world and the more I find out the better it is, I like to find out. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The same equations have the same solutions. Thus when you have solved a mathematical problem, you can re-use the solution in another physical situation. Feynman was skilled in transforming a problem into one that he could solve. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 The wonderful thing about science is that it's alive. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 What does it mean, to understand? ... I don't know. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 When you are solving a problem, don't worry. Now, after you have solved the problem, then that's the time to worry. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 Know how to solve every problem that has been solved. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 You know, the most amazing thing happened to me tonight. I was coming here, on the way to the lecture, and I came in through the parking lot. And you won't believe what happened. I saw a car with the license plate ARW 357. Can you imagine? Of all the millions of license plates in the state, what was the chance that I would see that particular one tonight? Amazing! 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I am not happy with all the analysis that go with just classical theory, because nature is not classic, dammit, and if you want to make a simulation of nature you’d better make it quantum mechanical and by golly it is a wonderful problem. 
Author: Richard Phillips Feynman
Nationality: American
b. 11 May 1918  - d. 15 February 1988
  
 I'm eh, at the foot of the ladder. 
Author: Neil Armstrong
Nationality: American
b. 5 August 1930
  
 Science has everything to say about what is possible. Science has nothing to say about what is permissible.  
Author: Charles Krauthammer
Nationality: American
b. 13 March 1950
  
 If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes. But if I were to go on to say that, since my assertion cannot be disproved, it is an intolerable presumption on the part of human reason to doubt it, I should rightly be thought to be talking nonsense. If, however, the existence of such a teapot were affirmed in ancient books, taught as the sacred truth every Sunday, and instilled into the minds of children at school, hesitation to believe in its existence would become a mark of eccentricity and entitle the doubter to the attentions of the psychiatrist in an enlightened age or of the Inquisitor in an earlier time.[ 
Author: Bertrand Russell
Nationality: British
b. 18 May 1872  - d. 2 February 1970
  
 What is a scientist after all? It is a curious man looking through a keyhole, the keyhole of nature, trying to know what’s going on. 
Author: Jacques Yves Cousteau
Nationality: French
b. 11 June 1910  - d. 25 June 1997
  
 I am not a scientist. I am, rather, an impresario of scientists. 
Author: Jacques Yves Cousteau
Nationality: French
b. 11 June 1910  - d. 25 June 1997
  
 A religious creed differs from a scientific theory in claiming to embody eternal and absolutely certain truth, whereas science is always tentative, expecting that modification in its present theories will sooner or later be found necessary, and aware that its method is one which is logically incapable of arriving at a complete and final demonstration. 
Author: Bertrand Russell
Nationality: British
b. 18 May 1872  - d. 2 February 1970
  
 While it is true that science cannot decide questions of value, that is because they cannot be intellectually decided at all, and lie outside the realm of truth and falsehood. Whatever knowledge is attainable, must be attained by scientific methods; and what science cannot discover, mankind cannot know. 
Author: Bertrand Russell
Nationality: British
b. 18 May 1872  - d. 2 February 1970
  
 I believe that the quantum of our knowledge will increase considerably in the coming years and that scientists will continue to be amongst the brave voices speaking out. 
Author: Peter Garrett
Nationality: Australian
b. 16 April 1953
  
 My analysis was directed toward purely physical conditions, such as defective wiring, presence or lack of air spaces between metal flues and woodwork, etc., and the results were presented in these terms. But in due course it became evident that not only a physical situation qua physics, but the meaning of that situation to people, was sometimes a factor, through the behavior of people, in the start of a fire. And this factor of meaning was clearest when it was a LINGUISTIC MEANING [Whorf's emphasis], residing in the name or the linguistic description commonly applied to this situation. Thus, around a storage of what are called 'gasoline drums,' behavior will tend to a certain type, that is, great care will be exercised; while around a storage of what are called 'empty gasoline drums,' it will tend to be different - careless, with little repression of smoking or of tossing cigarette stubs about. Yet the 'empty' drums are perhaps the more dangerous, since they contain explosive vapor. Physically, the situation is hazardous, but the linguistic analysis according to regular analogy must employ the word 'empty,' which inevitably suggests a lack of hazard. The word 'empty' is used in two linguistic patterns: (1) as a virtual synonym for 'null and void, negative, inert,' (2) applied in analysis of physical situations without regard to, e.g., vapor, liquid vestiges, or stray rubbish, in the container. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 At the same time, new concepts and abstractions flow into the picture, taking up the task of describing the universe without reference to such time or space - abstractions for which our language lacks adequate terms.  
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 But in due course it became evident that not only a physical situation qua physics, but the meaning of that situation to people, was sometimes a factor, through the behavior of people, in the start of a fire. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 Language is not simply a reporting device for experience but a defining framework for it. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 Most metaphysical words in Hopi are verbs, not nouns as in European languages. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 My analysis was directed toward purely physical conditions, such as defective wiring, presence of lack of air spaces between metal flues and woodwork, etc., and the results were presented in these terms. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 Too long has the public mind considered religion to be synonymous with priestcraft. 
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 We dissect nature along lines laid down by our native language.  
Author: Benjamin Lee Whorf
Nationality: American
b. 24 April 1897  - d. 26 July 1941
  
 But in simple substances the influence of one monad over another is ideal only. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 Finally there are simple ideas of which no definition can be given; there are also axioms or postulates, or in a word primary principles, which cannot be proved and have no need of proof. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 For since it is impossible for a created monad to have a physical influence on the inner nature of another, this is the only way in which one can be dependent on another. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 I also take it as granted that every created thing, and consequently the created monad also, is subject to change, and indeed that this change is continual in each one. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 I do not conceive of any reality at all as without genuine unity. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 I hold that the mark of a genuine idea is that its possibility can be proved, either a priori by conceiving its cause or reason, or a posteriori when experience teaches us that it is in fact in nature. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 I maintain also that substances, whether material or immaterial, cannot be conceived in their bare essence without any activity, activity being of the essence of substance in general. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 Indeed every monad must be different from every other. For there are never in nature two beings, which are precisely alike, and in which it is not possible to find some difference which is internal, or based on some intrinsic quality. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 It can have its effect only through the intervention of God, inasmuch as in the ideas of God a monad rightly demands that God, in regulating the rest from the beginning of things, should have regard to itself. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 It follows from what we have just said, that the natural changes of monads come from an internal principle, since an external cause would be unable to influence their inner being. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 Men act like brutes in so far as the sequences of their perceptions arise through the principle of memory only, like those empirical physicians who have mere practice without theory. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 Music is the pleasure the human mind experiences from counting without being aware that it is counting. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 Now where there are no parts, there neither extension, nor shape, nor divisibility is possible. And these monads are the true atoms of nature and, in a word, the elements of things. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 The ultimate reason of things must lie in a necessary substance, in which the differentiation of the changes only exists eminently as in their source; and this is what we call God. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 There are also two kinds of truths: truth of reasoning and truths of fact. Truths of reasoning are necessary and their opposite is impossible; those of fact are contingent and their opposite is possible. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 This is why the ultimate reason of things must lie in a necessary substance, in which the differentiation of the changes only exists eminently as in their source; and this is what we call God. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 When a truth is necessary, the reason for it can be found by analysis, that is, by resolving it into simpler ideas and truths until the primary ones are reached. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 Whence it follows that God is absolutely perfect, since perfection is nothing but magnitude of positive reality, in the strict sense, setting aside the limits or bounds in things which are limited. 
Author: Gottfried Leibnitz
Nationality: German
b. 1 July 1646  - d. 14 November 1716
  
 In laboratory tests on animal subjects, DDT has produced suspicious liver tumors. Scientists of the Food and Drug Administration who reported the discovery of these tumors were uncertain how to classify them, but felt there was some "justification for considering them low grade hepatic cell carcinomas." Dr. Hueper, author of Occupational Tumors and Allied Diseases now gives DDT the definite rating of a "chemical carcinogen. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 The aim of science is to discover and illuminate truth. And that, I take it, is the aim of literature, whether biography or history or fiction. It seems to me, then, that there can be no separate literature of science. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 The winds, the sea, and the moving tides are what they are. If there is wonder and beauty and majesty in them, science will discover these qualities. If they are not there, science cannot create them. If there is poetry in my book about the sea, it is not because I deliberately put it there, but because no one could write truthfully about the sea and leave out the poetry. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 We have looked first at man with his vanities and greed and his problems of a day or a year; and then only, and from this biased point of view, we have looked outward at the earth he has inhabited so briefly and at the universe in which our earth is so minute a part. Yet these are the great realities, and against them we see our human problems in a different perspective. Perhaps if we reversed the telescope and looked at man down these long vistas, we should find less time and inclination to plan for our own destruction. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 Mankind has gone very far into an artificial world of his own creation. He has sought to insulate himself, in his cities of steel and concrete, from the realities of earth and water and the growing seed. Intoxicated with a sense of his own power, he seems to be going farther and farther into more experiments for the destruction of himself and his world. There is certainly no single remedy for this condition and I am offering no panacea. But it seems reasonable to believe - and I do believe - that the more clearly we can focus our attention on the wonders and realities of the universe about us the less taste we shall have for the destruction of our race. Wonder and humility are wholesome emotions, and they do not exist side by side with a lust for destruction. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 We have been troubled about the world, and had almost lost faith in man; it helps to think about the long history of the earth, and of how life came to be. And when we think in terms of millions of years, we are not so impatient that our own problems be solved tomorrow. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 The real wealth of the Nation lies in the resources of the earth — soil, water, forests, minerals, and wildlife. To utilize them for present needs while insuring their preservation for future generations requires a delicately balanced and continuing program, based on the most extensive research. Their administration is not properly, and cannot be, a matter of politics. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 Only within the 20th Century has biological thought been focused on ecology, or the relation of the living creature to its environment. Awareness of ecological relationships is - or should be - the basis of modern conservation programs, for it is useless to attempt to preserve a living species unless the kind of land or water it requires is also preserved. So delicately interwoven are the relationships that when we disturb one thread of the community fabric we alter it all - perhaps almost imperceptibly, perhaps so drastically that destruction follows. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 If we have been slow to develop the general concepts of ecology and conservation, we have been even more tardy in recognizing the facts of the ecology and conservation of man himself. We may hope that this will be the next major phase in the development of biology. Here and there awareness is growing that man, far from being the overlord of all creation, is himself part of nature, subject to the same cosmic forces that control all other life. Man's future welfare and probably even his survival depend upon his learning to live in harmony, rather than in combat, with these forces. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 I like to define biology as the history of the earth and all its life - past, present, and future. To understand biology is to understand that all life is linked to the earth from which it came; it is to understand that the stream of life, flowing out of the dim past into the uncertain future, is in reality a unified force, though composed of an infinite number and variety of separate lives. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 Any concept of biology is not only sterile and profitless, it is distorted and untrue, if it puts its primary focus on unnatural conditions rather than on those vast forces not of man's making that shape and channel the nature and direction of life. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 I sincerely believe that for the child, and for the parent seeking to guide him, it is not half so important to know as to feel. If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow. The years of early childhood are the time to prepare the soil. Once the emotions have been aroused — a sense of the beautiful, the excitement of the new and the unknown, a feeling of sympathy, pity, admiration or love - then we wish for knowledge about the subject of our emotional response. Once found, it has lasting meaning. It is more important to pave the way for the child to want to know than to put him on a diet of facts he is not ready to assimilate. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 A rainy day is the perfect time for a walk in the woods. I always thought so myself; the Maine woods never seem so fresh and alive as in wet weather. Then all the needles on the evergreens wear a sheath of silver; ferns seem to have grown to almost tropical lushness and every leaf has its edging of crystal drops. Strangely colored fungi - mustard-yellow and apricot and scarlet - are pushing out of the leaf mold and all the lichens and the mosses have come alive with green and silver freshness. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 Over increasingly large areas of the United States, spring now comes unheralded by the return of the birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of bird song. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 These sprays, dusts, and aerosols are now applied almost universally to farms, gardens, forests, and homes - nonselective chemicals that have the power to kill every insect, the "good" and the "bad," to still the song of birds and the leaping of fish in the streams, to coat the leaves with a deadly film, and to linger on in soil - all this though the intended target may be only a few weeds or insects. Can anyone believe it is possible to lay down such a barrage of poisons on the surface of the earth without making it unfit for all life? They should not be called "insecticides," but "biocides." 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 For each of us, as for the robin in Michigan or the Salmon in the Miramichi, this is a problem of ecology, of interrelationships, of interdependence. We poison the caddis flies in a stream and the salmon runs dwindle and die. We poison the gnats in a lake and the poison travels from link to link of the food chain and soon the birds of the lake margins become its victims. We spray our elms and the following springs are silent of robin song, not because we sprayed the robins directly but because the poison traveled, step by step, through the now familiar elm leaf-earthworm-robin cycle. These are matters of record, observable, part of the visible world around us. They reflect the web of life - or death - that scientists know as ecology. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost's familiar poem, they are not equally fair. The road we have long been traveling is deceptively easy, a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed, but at its end lies disaster. The other fork of the road - the one less traveled by - offers our last, our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of the earth. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 To the bird watcher, the suburbanite who derives joy from birds in his garden, the hunter, the fisherman or the explorer of wild regions, anything that destroys the wildlife of an area for even a single year has deprived him of pleasure to which he has a legitimate right. This is a valid point of view. 
Author: Rachel Carson
Nationality: American
b. December 1907  - d.  December 1964
  
 It isn't decent for society to make a man do this thing himself. Probably this is the last day I will be able to do it myself. 
Author: P. W. Bridgman
Nationality: American
b. 21 April 1882  - d. 20 August 1961
  
 I am not bipolar… Does mental illness make a person unfit for work? That’s a tricky one. In general, it would depend on the severity and the type of disorder and the nature of the work someone does. In many cases I think the structure of work and the nature of some people’s work is an important factor in the equation of treating the negative impact of mental unwellness. I think severe and untreated mental illness would make it very difficult to work. I find my work hugely enjoyable and at times therapeutic. 
Author: Catherine Deveny
Nationality: Australian   
 To assert that the earth revolves around the sun is as erroneous as to claim that Jesus was not born of a virgin. 
Author: Cardinal Roberto Bellarmine
Nationality: Italian
b. 04 October 1542  - d. 17 September 1621
  
 NASA scientist have discovered a new form of life, unfortunately, it won't date them either. 
Author: Stephen Colbert
Nationality: American
b. 13 May 1964
  
 Twenty-two astronauts were born in Ohio. What is it about your state that makes people want to flee the Earth? 
Author: Stephen Colbert
Nationality: American
b. 13 May 1964
  
 Science is too important not to be a part of popular culture. 
Author: Professor Brian Cox
Nationality: American
b. 03 March 1968
  
 Anyone who thinks the Large Hadron Collider will destroy the world is a twat. 
Author: Professor Brian Cox
Nationality: American
b. 03 March 1968
  
 Look at that! If you ever needed convincing that we live in the solar system, that we are on a ball of rock, orbiting around the Sun with other balls of rock, then look at that! That’s the solar system coming down and grabbing you by the throat. 
Author: Professor Brian Cox
Nationality: American
b. 03 March 1968
  
 What scientists are attached to is journeys into the unknown and discovering things that are completely unexpected and baffling and surprising. 
Author: Professor Brian Cox
Nationality: American
b. 03 March 1968
  
 I hope my studies may be an encouragement to other women, especially to young women, to devote their lives to the larger interests of the mind. It matters little whether men or women have the more brains; all we women need to do to exert our proper influence is just to use all the brains we have. 
Author: Florence Sabin
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1871  - d. 03 October 1953
  
 God did not create Universe: The Big Bang was inevitable consequence of laws of physics. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 When it came to the creation of the Universe, God just wasn't necessary. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 It is not necessary to invoke God to light the blue touch paper and set the Universe going. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Because there is a law such as gravity, the Universe can and will create itself from nothing. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Spontaneous creation is the reason there is something rather than nothing, why the Universe exists, why we exist. 
Author: Stephen Hawking
Nationality: British
b. 08 January 1942
  
 Submission to the experimental data is the golden rule that dominates any scientific discipline. 
Author: Maurice Allais
Nationality: French
b. 31 May 1911  - d. 09 October 2010
  
 Any author who uses mathematics should always express in ordinary language the meaning of the assumptions he admits, as well as the significance of the results obtained. The more abstract his theory, the more imperative this obligation. In fact, mathematics are and can only be a tool to explore reality. In this exploration, mathematics do not constitute an end in itself, they are and can only be a means. 
Author: Maurice Allais
Nationality: French
b. 31 May 1911  - d. 09 October 2010
  
 Anyone who dares to speak about an aether is regarded as an ignorant and backward mind and he can only lose his credibility in scientific circles, although in reality those who criticize him use the same concept of intermediate medium in other words, whether it be fields, an associated fluid, a probability fluid, a pilot fluid, a quantum fluid, etc. 
Author: Maurice Allais
Nationality: French
b. 31 May 1911  - d. 09 October 2010
  
 Too many theorists have a tendency to ignore facts that contradict their convictions. 
Author: Maurice Allais
Nationality: French
b. 31 May 1911  - d. 09 October 2010
  
 In fact, without any exaggeration, the current mechanism of money creation through credit is certainly the "cancer" that's irretrievably eroding market economies of private property. 
Author: Maurice Allais
Nationality: French
b. 31 May 1911  - d. 09 October 2010
  
 Biologically speaking, if something bites you it's more likely to be female. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 We never stop investigating. We are never satisfied that we know enough to get by. Every question we answer leads on to another question. This has become the greatest survival trick of our species. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 I viewed my fellow man not as a fallen angel, but as a risen ape. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 We are, to put it mildly, in a mess, and there is a strong chance that we shall have exterminated ourselves by the end of the century. Our only consolation will have to be that, as a species, we have had an exciting term of office. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 Clearly, then, the city is not a concrete jungle, it is a human zoo. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 There are 193 species of monkeys and apes, 192 of them are covered with hair. The exception is a naked ape self-named Homo sapiens. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 This unusual and highly successful species spends a great deal of time examining his higher motives and an equal amount of time ignoring his fundamental ones. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 No matter how old we become, we can still call them "Holy Mother" and "Father" and put a child-like trust in them. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 Life is like a very short visit to a toyshop between birth and death. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 It has been shown off, concealed, styled, cut, trimmed, extended, straightened, waved, put up, let down, colored and decorated in a thousand ways. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 Artists like cats; soldiers like dogs. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 In little more than a single century from 1820 to 1945, no less than fifty-nine million human animals were killed in inter-group clashes of one sort or another. We describe these killings as men behaving "like animals," but if we could find a wild animal that showed signs of acting this way, it would be more precise to describe it as behaving like men. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 My writing, on the other hand, is always done with my readers in mind. I never write for my own amusement. I always try to put across an idea that I feel is important, in the most easily readable form I can manage. This has annoyed some of my academic colleagues, who feel that I am oversimplifying my subject, but I argue that at least my writings are widely read, while theirs stay firmly within the confines of their academic ivory towers. And I always work with one special rule in mind: simplification without distortion. This is, in fact, much harder than the usual self-indulgent academic writing. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 A belief in the validity of the acquisition of knowledge and a scientific understanding of the world we live in, the creation and appreciation of aesthetic phenomena in all their many forms, and the broadening and deepening of our range of experiences in day-to-day living, is rapidly becoming the 'religion' of our time. 
Author: Desmond Morris
Nationality: British
b. 24 January 1928
  
 Above all, I regret that scientific experiments - some of them mine - should have produced such a terrible weapon as the hydrogen bomb. Regret, with all my soul, but not guilt.  
Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Nationality: American
b. 29 April 1893  - d. 05 January 1981
  
 I looked for it [heavy hydrogen, deuterium] because I thought it should exist. I didn't know it would have industrial applications or be the basic for the most powerful weapon ever known, the nuclear bomb. I thought maybe my discovery might have the practical value of, say, neon in neon signs.  
Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Nationality: American
b. 29 April 1893  - d. 05 January 1981
  
 Life is not a miracle. It is a natural phenomenon, and can be expected to appear whenever there is a planet whose conditions duplicate those of the earth. 
Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Nationality: American
b. 29 April 1893  - d. 05 January 1981
  
 My study of the universe leaves little doubt that life has occurred on other planets. I doubt if the human race is the most intelligent form of life.  
Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Nationality: American
b. 29 April 1893  - d. 05 January 1981
  
 Pure research is worth every penny it costs. 
Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Nationality: American
b. 29 April 1893  - d. 05 January 1981
  
 Science is the systematic classification of experience. 
Author: George Henry Lewes
Nationality: English
b. 18 April 1817  - d. 28 November 1878
  
 When I find myself in the company of scientists, I feel like a shabby curate who has strayed by mistake into a drawing room full of dukes. 
Author: W. H. Auden
Nationality: American
b. 21 February 1907  - d. 29 September 1973
  
 Scientists - the crowd that for dash and style make the general public look like the Bloomsbury set. 
Author: Fran Lebowitz
Nationality: American
b. 27 October 1950
  
 We may disagree with Randi on certain points, but we ignore him at our peril. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 Life is a wave, which in no two consecutive moments of its existence is composed of the same particles. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 The brightest flashes in the world of thought are incomplete until they have been proven to have their counterparts in the world of fact. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 If I wanted a loving father, a faithful husband, an honorable neighbor, and a just citizen, I would seek him among the band of Atheists. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 Science keeps down the weed of superstition not by logic, but by rendering the mental soil unfit for its cultivation. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 The formation of right habits is essential to your permanent security. They diminish your chance of falling when assaulted, and they augment your chance of recovery when overthrown. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 You urge, in vain, that science has given us all the knowledge of the universe which we know possess, while spiritualism has added nothing to that knowledge. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 The wind is a musical instrument with a certain range of tones, beyond which in both directions we have an infinite silence. 
Author: John Tyndall
Nationality: British
b. 2 August 1820  - d. 4 December 1893
  
 Most were beginning to feel they had learned enough to last for the rest of their lives. They remained mathematicians, but largely went their own way. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 My fate has been that what I undertook was fully understood only after the fact. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 Nobody will deny that there is at least some roughness everywhere. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 Now that I near 80, I realize with wistful pleasure that on many occasions I was 10, 20, 40, even 50 years ahead of my time. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 Order doesn't come by itself. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 Smooth shapes are very rare in the wild but extremely important in the ivory tower and the factory. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 The techniques I developed for studying turbulence, like weather, also apply to the stock market. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 There is a joke that your hammer will always find nails to hit. I find that perfectly acceptable. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 There is a saying that every nice piece of work needs the right person in the right place at the right time 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 Think of color, pitch, loudness, heaviness, and hotness. Each is the topic of a branch of physics. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 Until a few years ago, the topics in my Ph.D. were unfashionable, but they are very popular today. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 When the weather changes, nobody believes the laws of physics have changed. Similarly, I don't believe that when the stock market goes into terrible gyrations its rules have changed. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 One of my conjectures was solved in six months, a second in five years, a third in 10. But the basic conjecture remains-the Mandelbrot Set. 
Author: Benoît Mandelbrot
Nationality: British
b. 20 November 1924  - d. 14 October 2010
  
 My view of the prevalence of doom-and-gloom in Cambridge is that it is a result of the English class system. In England there were always two sharply opposed middle classes, the academic middle class and the commercial middle class. In the nineteenth century, the academic middle class won the battle for power and status. As a child of the academic middle class, I learned to look on the commercial middle class with loathing and contempt. Then came the triumph of Margaret Thatcher, which was also the revenge of the commercial middle class. The academics lost their power and prestige and the business people took over. The academics never forgave Thatcher and have been gloomy ever since. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 I am neither a saint nor a theologian. To me, good works are more important than theology. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 Weinberg's statement is true as far as it goes, but it is not the whole truth. To make it the whole truth, we must add an additional clause: "And for bad people to do good things—that [also] takes religion." The main point of Christianity is that it is a religion for sinners. Jesus made that very clear. When the Pharisees asked his disciples, "Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners?" he said, "I come to call not the righteous but sinners to repentance." Only a small fraction of sinners repent and do good things but only a small fraction of good people are led by their religion to do bad things. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 Even in the noisiest system, errors can be reliably corrected and accurate information transmitted, provided that the transmission is sufficiently redundant. That is, in a nutshell, how Wikipedia works. Science is the sum total of a great multitude of mysteries. It is an unending argument between a great multitude of voices. It resembles Wikipedia much more than it resembles the Encyclopaedia Britannica. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 You can't possibly get a good technology going without an enormous number of failures. It's a universal rule. If you look at bicycles, there were thousands of weird models built and tried before they found the one that really worked. You could never design a bicycle theoretically. Even now, after we've been building them for 100 years, it's very difficult to understand just why a bicycle works - it's even difficult to formulate it as a mathematical problem. But just by trial and error, we found out how to do it, and the error was essential. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 I agreed emphatically with Henry Stimson. Once we had got ourselves into the business of bombing cities, we might as well do the job competently and get it over with. I felt better that morning than I had felt for years… Those fellows who had built the atomic bombs obviously knew their stuff… Later, much later, I would remember the downside. I am convinced that to avoid nuclear war it is not sufficient to be afraid of it. It is necessary to be afraid, but it is equally necessary to understand. And the first step in understanding is to recognize that the problem of nuclear war is basically not technical but human and historical. If we are to avoid destruction we must first of all understand the human and historical context out of which destruction arises. 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 As a scientist I want to rip the theory of nuclear winter apart, but as a human being I want to believe it. This is one of the rare instances of a genuine conflict between the demands of science and the demands of humanity. As a scientist, I judge the nuclear winter theory to be a sloppy piece of work, full of gaps and unjustified assumptions. As a human being, I hope fervently that it is right. Here is a real and uncomfortable dilemma. What does a scientist do when science and humanity pull in opposite directions? 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 The models solve the equations of fluid dynamics, and they do a very good job of describing the fluid motions of the atmosphere and the oceans. They do a very poor job of describing the clouds, the dust, the chemistry and the biology of fields and farms and forests. They do not begin to describe the real world we live in 
Author: Freeman John Dyson
Nationality: English
b. December 1923
  
 Science searches for relations which are thought to exist independently of the searching individual. This includes the case where man himself is the subject. Or the subject of scientific statements may be concepts created by ourselves, as in mathematics. Such concepts are not necessarily supposed to correspond to any objects in the outside world. However, all scientific statements and laws have one characteristic in common: they are “true or false” - adequate or inadequate. Roughly speaking, our reaction to them is “yes or “no.” 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 Questioning our own motives, and our own process, is critical to a skeptical and scientific outlook. We must realize that the default mode of human psychology is to grab onto comforting beliefs for purely emotional reasons, and then justify those beliefs to ourselves with post-hoc rationalizations. It takes effort to rise above this tendency, to step back from our beliefs and our emotional connection to conclusions and focus on the process. The process - i.e science, logic, and intellectual rigor, has to be more important than the belief. 
Author: Dr. Steven Novella
Nationality: American
b. 29 July 1969
  
 You can't reason someone out of an opinion they didn't reason themselves into in the first place. 
Author: Dr. Steven Novella
Nationality: American
b. 29 July 1969
  
 zzzzz 
Author: Rebecca Watson
Nationality: American
b. 18 October 1980
  
 A woman exiting a building in Clearwater Florida noticed an unusual, colorful shape covering nine of its exterior glass windows. This vague outline (see picture on cover) was soon interpreted as the Virgin Mary making one of her many appearances to mankind. Word spread very quickly and in no time many of the faithful and curious journeyed to the site to see the image. Depending on your source, 500,000 to one million people from coast to coast eventually visited the building stopping traffic for miles around. All forms of media, local and national, also reported the phenomenon for days after this initial appearance. It's not too difficult to see what appears to be the outline of a hooded robe draped over a head and upper body. As you can see, the image is very vague and many other interpretations could be visualized. This is a classic case of pareidolia. 
Author: Robert Novella
Nationality: American   
 Vision is indeed the paragon of the human senses. With it we can distinguish millions of shades of colors, recognize thousands of faces instantly, and even detect the presence of a single photon of light. The vivid colors, the three-dimensional shapes, and the complicated motions we observe are all the more remarkable when we consider that the image on each retina is two-dimensional, upside down, distorted, and the size of a postage stamp. The vast majority of the information that sighted individuals acquire comes through the eyes and, if given a choice, most of us would rather lose any other sense than our precious vision. This feeling is likewise echoed by the brain's architecture itself. Almost one third the brain is involved in processing visual information. Indeed, the eyes themselves are really little bits of our brain that are poking out of our heads and peering at the world.  
Author: Robert Novella
Nationality: American   
 zzzzz 
Author: Evan Bernstein
Nationality: American   
 It is certain that the combinations which present themselves to the mind in a kind of sudden illumination after a somewhat prolonged period of unconscious work are generally useful and fruitful combinations, all the combinations are formed as a result of the automatic action of the subliminal ego, but those only which are interesting find their way into the field of consciousness. A few only are harmonious, and consequently at once useful and beautiful, and they will be capable of affecting the geometrician's special sensibility I have been speaking of; which, once aroused, will direct our attention upon them, and will thus give them the opportunity of becoming conscious. In the subliminal ego, on the contrary, there reigns what I would call liberty, if one could give this name to the mere absence of discipline and to disorder born of chance. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 A sane mind should not be guilty of a logical fallacy, yet there are very fine minds incapable of following mathematical demonstrations. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 A scientist worthy of his name, about all a mathematician, experiences in his work the same impression as an artist; his pleasure is as great and of the same nature. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 A small error in the former will produce an enormous error in the latter. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 A very small cause which escapes our notice determines a considerable effect that we cannot fail to see, and then we say that the effect is due to chance. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Absolute space, that is to say, the mark to which it would be necessary to refer the earth to know whether it really moves, has no objective existence. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Facts do not speak. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Geometry is not true, it is advantageous. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 How is an error possible in mathematics? 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Hypotheses are what we lack the least. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Ideas rose in clouds; I felt them collide until pairs interlocked, so to speak, making a stable combination. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 If one looks at the different problems of the integral calculus which arise naturally when one wishes to go deep into the different parts of physics, it is impossible not to be struck by the analogies existing. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 If that enabled us to predict the succeeding situation with the same approximation, that is all we require, and we should say that the phenomenon had been predicted, that it is governed by the laws. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 If we knew exactly the laws of nature and the situation of the universe at the initial moment, we could predict exactly the situation of the same universe at a succeeding moment. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 In the old days when people invented a new function they had something useful in mind. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Invention consists in avoiding the constructing of useless contraptions and in constructing the useful combinations which are in infinite minority. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 It has adopted the geometry most advantageous to the species or, in other words, the most convenient. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 It is far better to foresee even without certainty than not to foresee at all. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 It is the harmony of the diverse parts, their symmetry, their happy balance; in a word it is all that introduces order, all that gives unity, that permits us to see clearly and to comprehend at once both the ensemble and the details. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 It is through science that we prove, but through intuition that we discover. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Mathematical discoveries, small or great are never born of spontaneous generation. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Mathematicians do not study objects, but relations between objects.  
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Need we add that mathematicians themselves are not infallible? 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 One would have to have completely forgotten the history of science so as to not remember that the desire to know nature has had the most constant and the happiest influence on the development of mathematics. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Point set topology is a disease from which the human race will soon recover. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 Science is facts. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 The mathematical facts worthy of being studied are those which, by their analogy with other facts, are capable of leading us to the knowledge of a physical law. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 The mind uses its faculty for creativity only when experience forces it to do so. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 They are free to replace some objects by others so long as the relations remain unchanged. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 To doubt everything, or, to believe everything, are two equally convenient solutions; both dispense with the necessity of reflection. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 To invent is to discern, to choose. 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 What is it indeed that gives us the feeling of elegance in a solution, in a demonstration? 
Author: Henri Poincaré
Nationality: French
b. 29 April 1854  - d. 17 July 1912
  
 My area of research is something that in all fairness has no practical usability whatsoever and the thing is I'm often asked to apologize for that. It is interesting to me that people ask 'what's the point of doing that if it's not useful?' But they never ask that, or do they very rarely ask that about art or literature or music. Those things are not gonna produce a better toaster. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 There is a maxim about the universe which I always tell my students: That which is not explicitly forbidden is guaranteed to occur. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 Now, since the time of Newton there had been a debate about whether light was a wave - that is, a traveling disturbance in some background medium - or a particle, which travels regardless of the presence of a background medium. The observation of Maxwell that electromagnetic waves must exist and that their speed was identical to that of light ended the debate: light was an electromagnetic wave. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 Richard Feynman used to go up to people all the time and he'd say "You won't believe what happened to me today... you won't believe what happened to me" and people would say "What?" and he'd say "Absolutely nothing". Because we humans believe that everything that happens to us is special and significant. And that, and Carl Sagan wrote beautifully about that in The Demon-Haunted World - that is much of the source of religion. Everything that happens is unusual and I expect that the likelihood that Richard and I ever would've met. If you think about all the variables: the probability that we were in the same place at the same time, ate breakfast the same. Whatever. It's zero. Every event that happens has small probability... but it happens and then when it happens; if it's weird, if you dream one million nights and it's nonsense but one night you dream that your friend is gonna break his leg and the next day he breaks his arm - *sound of revelation*. So, the thing that physics tell us about the universe is that it's big, rare event happens all the time - including life - and that doesn't mean it's special. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 If you have nothing in quantum mechanics, you will always have something. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And, the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics: You are all stardust. You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded, because the elements - the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution and for life - weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars, and the only way for them to get into your body is if those stars were kind enough to explode. So, forget Jesus. The stars died so that you could be here today. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 You couldn't be here if stars hadn't exploded. Because the elements, the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution weren't created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars. And the only way they could get into your body is if the stars were kind enough to explode. So forget Jesus. The stars died so that you could be here today. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 We seem doomed to travel in only one direction, into the future. 
Author: Lawrence M. Krauss
Nationality: American
b. 27 May 1954
  
 The God of the Bible is also the God of the genome. He can be worshipped in the cathedral or in the laboratory. His creation is majestic, awesome, intricate, and beautiful. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 As someone who's had the privilege of leading the human genome project, I've had the opportunity to study our own DNA instruction book at a level of detail that was never really possible before. It's also now been possible to compare our DNA with that of many other species. The evidence supporting the idea that all living things are descended from a common ancestor is truly overwhelming. I would not necessarily wish that to be so, as a Bible-believing Christian. But it is so. It does not serve faith well to try to deny that. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 This is a stunning surprise, rather like finding out that the key to your house also works in the ignition of your car. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 FTIs, originally developed for cancer, are capable of reversing the dramatic nuclear structure abnormalities that are the hallmark of cells from children with progeria. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 We can peek into evolution's lab notebook and see what went on there. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 It's a huge deal. We now have the instruction book of our closest relative. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 As our closest relatives, they (chimpanzees) tell us special things about what it means to be a primate and, ultimately, what it means to be a human at the DNA level. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 Sequencing the chimp genome is a historic achievement that is destined to lead to many more exciting discoveries with implications for human health. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 Four years ago, we took down the book called Homo sapiens. Today, we take down the book next to it on the shelf. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 I think it's a time to be very excited and optimistic, within the next five to 10 years. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 We need effective legislation to make those kinds of misuse illegal. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 it's hard to overstate the importance of reading our own instruction book and that's what the human genome project is all about. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 The hopes of the parent of a child with a birth defect, the hopes of a young man with a family history of cancer, the hopes of a couple caring for an aging parent are in some way advanced by our having this instruction book of an animal which is a model for all of those circumstances. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 What a profound responsibility it is to do this work. Historians will consider this a turning point. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 I find death terrifying. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 The Genome Project gave us the letters of the DNA code that we all share. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 More than 300 genes have been implicated in the diabolical transformation of normal cells into cancer cells, and that has led to major insights into cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 This is an audacious undertaking. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 You're going to see a proliferation of discoveries about the genetic contributions to diabetes and heart disease and high blood pressure and schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis and on down the list. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 By 2015, we will see the beginnings of a real transformation in the therapeutics of medicine, which by 2020 will have touched virtually every disorder. And the drugs that we give in 2020 will for the most part be those that were based on the understanding of the genome, and the things that we use today will be relegated to the dust bin. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 The time is right to bring the full power of genomics to bear on the problem of cancer. Waiting another two years would have been too long. The biological research planets are aligned. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 The question is if we do collect a lot of genetic material from people. Are you going to see those people then injured when their health provider or employer uses that information to take away opportunities. At the moment, in the United States particularly, those protections are not in place at a federal level. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 This is a pair of programs where the public is the main winner. The genome has been compared to a textbook, and what we're talking about today is an opportunity to learn how to read that textbook in a more precise way. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 All illnesses have some heredity contribution. It's been said that genetics loads the gun and environment pulls the trigger. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 This is not just an academic exercise by a bunch of nerdy gene hunters. This is an engine that will transform medicine. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 These revelations arrive almost five years early from the original predictions of not having this information until 2005, and here we are. We have the first draft of our own book of life and we've read it from cover to cover, and we've discovered some pretty amazing surprises. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 Conditions that we know have genetic contributions but which have been rather difficult to nail down, this set of power tools that the genome project is producing will accelerate this discovery process rather dramatically, and we're going to see the consequences of that in the next three to five years. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 We are still working with an incomplete compass. The time is right to bring the full power of genomics to bear on the problem of cancer. 
Author: Francis S. Collins
Nationality: American
b. 14 April 1950
  
 It would appear, then, that one cannot be coherently religious and scientific at the same time. That alleged synthesis requires that with one part of your brain you accept only those things that are tested and supported by agreed-upon evidence, logic, and reason, while with the other part of your brain you accept things that are unsupportable or even falsified. In other words, the price of philosophical harmony is cognitive dissonance. Accepting both science and conventional faith leaves you with a double standard: rational on the origin of blood clotting, irrational on the Resurrection; rational on dinosaurs, irrational on virgin births. Without good cause, Giberson and Miller pick and choose what they believe. At least the young-earth creationists are consistent, for they embrace supernatural causation across the board. With his usual flair, the physicist Richard Feynman characterized this difference: “Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself. The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool.” With religion, there is just no way to know if you are fooling yourself. 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 This disharmony is a dirty little secret in scientific circles. It is in our personal and professional interest to proclaim that science and religion are perfectly harmonious. After all, we want our grants funded by the government, and our schoolchildren exposed to real science instead of creationism. Liberal religious people have been important allies in our struggle against creationism, and it is not pleasant to alienate them by declaring how we feel. This is why, as a tactical matter, groups such as the National Academy of Sciences claim that religion and science do not conflict. But their main evidence–the existence of religious scientists–is wearing thin as scientists grow ever more vociferous about their lack of faith. Now Darwin Year is upon us, and we can expect more books like those by Kenneth Miller and Karl Giberson. Attempts to reconcile God and evolution keep rolling off the intellectual assembly line. It never stops, because the reconciliation never works. 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 Now, science cannot completely exclude the possibility of supernatural explanation. It is possible - though very unlikely - that our whole world is controlled by elves. 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 Supernatural explanations always mean the end of inquiry: that’s the way God wants it, end of story. Science, on the other hand, is never satisfied: our studies of the universe will continue until humans go extinct 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 Truth be told, evolution hasn’t yielded many practical or commercial benefits. Yes, bacteria evolve drug resistance, and yes, we must take countermeasures, but beyond that there is not much to say. Evolution cannot help us predict what new vaccines to manufacture because microbes evolve unpredictably. But hasn’t evolution helped guide animal and plant breeding? Not very much. Most improvement in crop plants and animals occurred long before we knew anything about evolution, and came about by people following the genetic principle of ‘like begets like’. Even now, as its practitioners admit, the field of quantitative genetics has been of little value in helping improve varieties. Future advances will almost certainly come from transgenics, which is not based on evolution at all. 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 These mysteries about how we evolved should not distract us from the indisputable fact that we did evolve. 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 In science's pecking order, evolutionary biology lurks somewhere near the bottom, far closer to phrenology than to physics. For evolutionary biology is a historical science, laden with history's inevitable imponderables. We evolutionary biologists cannot generate a Cretaceous Park to observe exactly what killed the dinosaurs; and, unlike "harder" scientists, we usually cannot resolve issues with a simple experiment, such as adding tube A to tube B and noting the color of the mixture. 
Author: Jerry A. Coyne
Nationality: American   
 A possible explanation of the physicist's use of mathematics to formulate his laws of nature is that he is a somewhat irresponsible person. As a result, when he finds a connection between two quantities which resembles a connection well-known from mathematics, he will jump at the conclusion that the connection is that discussed in mathematics simply because he does not know of any other similar connection. 
Author: Eugene Paul Wigner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 17 November 1902  - d. 01 January 1955
  
 The miracle of the appropriateness of the language of mathematics for the formulation of the laws of physics is a wonderful gift which we neither understand nor deserve. 
Author: Eugene Paul Wigner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 17 November 1902  - d. 01 January 1955
  
 In science, it is not speed that is the most important. It is the dedication, the commitment, the interest and the will to know something and to understand it — these are the things that come first. 
Author: Eugene Paul Wigner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 17 November 1902  - d. 01 January 1955
  
 "Learning organizations" are organizations where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning how to learn together. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 In a learning organization, leaders are designers, stewards, and teachers. They are responsible for building organizations where people continually expand their capabilities to understand complexity, clarify vision, and improve shared mental models – that is, they are responsible for learning. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 Learning to see the structures within which we operate begins a process of freeing ourselves from previously unseen forces and ultimately mastering the ability to work with them and change them. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 In essence, leaders are people who "walk ahead," people genuinely committed to deep changes, in themselves and in their organizations. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 It is a testament to our naïveté about culture that we think that we can change it by simply declaring new values. Such declarations usually produce only cynicism. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 When executives lead as teachers, stewards, and designers, they fill roles that are much more subtle and long-term than those of power-wielding hierarchical leaders. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 Mutual reflection. Open and candid conversation. Questioning of old beliefs and assumptions. Learning to let go. Awareness of how our own actions create the systemic structures that produce our problems. Developing these learning capabilities lies at the heart of profound change. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 We believe that, ultimately, the most important learning occurs in the context of our day-to-day life, the aspirations we pursue, the challenges we face, and the responses we bring forth. 
Author: Peter M. Senge
Nationality: American
b. December 1947
  
 There's nothing colder than chemistry. 
Author: Anita Loos
Nationality: American
b. 26 April 1888  - d. 18 August 1981
  
 It is the genus that gives the characters, and not the characters that make the genus. 
Author: Carl Linnaeus
Nationality: Swedish
b. 23 May 1707  - d.  December 1778
  
 To live by medicine is to live horribly. 
Author: Carl Linnaeus
Nationality: Swedish
b. 23 May 1707  - d.  December 1778
  
 A practical botanist will distinguish at the first glance the plant of the different quarters of the globe and yet will be at a loss to tell by what marks he detects them. 
Author: Carl Linnaeus
Nationality: Swedish
b. 23 May 1707  - d.  December 1778
  
 If a tree dies, plant another in its place. 
Author: Carl Linnaeus
Nationality: Swedish
b. 23 May 1707  - d.  December 1778
  
 Winning the Nobel Prize does not automatically qualify you to be commander in chief. I think George Bush has proved definitively that to be president, you don’t need to care about science, literature or peace. 
Author: Stephen Colbert
Nationality: American
b. 13 May 1964
  
 Architects know that some kinds of design problems are more personal than others. One of the cleanest, most abstract design problems is designing bridges. There your job is largely a matter of spanning a given distance with the least material. The other end of the spectrum is designing chairs. Chair designers have to spend their time thinking about human butts. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The best thing software can be is easy, but the way to do this is to get the defaults right, not to limit users' choices. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Software has to be designed by hackers who understand design, not designers who know a little about software. If you can't design software as well as implement it, don't start a startup. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 If you try to solve a hard problem, the question is not whether you will use a powerful enough language, but whether you will (a) use a powerful language, (b) write a de facto interpreter for one, or (c) yourself become a human compiler for one. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The world seemed cruel and boring, and I'm not sure which was worse. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 When you tread water, you lift yourself up by pushing water down. Likewise, in any social hierarchy, people unsure of their own position will try to emphasize it by maltreating those they think rank below. I've read that this is why poor whites in the United States are the group most hostile to blacks. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Why do people move to suburbia? To have kids! So no wonder it seemed boring and sterile. The whole place was a giant nursery, an artificial town created explicitly for the purpose of breeding children. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Nerds serve two masters. They want to be popular, certainly, but they want even more to be smart. And popularity is not something you can do in your spare time, not in the fiercely competitive environment of an American secondary school. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 While the nerds were being trained to get the right answers, the popular kids were being trained to please. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 If you leave a bunch of eleven-year-olds to their own devices, what you get is Lord of the Flies. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Nerds aren't losers. They're just playing a different game, and a game much closer to the one played in the real world. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 A programming language is for thinking of programs, not for expressing programs you've already thought of. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 I've seen occasional articles about how to manage programmers. Really there should be two articles: one about what to do if you are yourself a programmer, and one about what to do if you're not. And the second could probably be condensed into two words: give up. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Your teachers are always telling you [high school students] to behave like adults. I wonder if they'd like it if you did. You may be loud and disorganized, but you're very docile compared to adults. Imagine the reaction of an FBI agent or taxi driver or reporter to being told they had to ask permission to go the bathroom, and only one person could go at a time.  
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 There's no switch inside you [high school students] that magically flips when you turn a certain age or graduate from some institution. You start being an adult when you decide to take responsibility for your life. You can do that at any age. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 It's not so important what you [high school students] work on, so long as you're not wasting your time. Work on things that interest you and increase your options, and worry later about which you'll take. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The world changes fast, and the rate at which it changes is itself speeding up. In such a world it's not a good idea to have fixed plans. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 If I were back in high school and someone asked about my plans, I'd say that my first priority was to learn what the options were. You [high school students] don't need to be in a rush to choose your life's work. What you need to do is discover what you like. You have to work on stuff you like if you want to be good at what you do. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 There are few sources of energy so powerful as a procrastinating grad student. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Competitors punch you in the jaw, but investors have you by the balls. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Consulting is where product companies go to die. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 No matter what you work on, you're not working on everything else. So the question is not how to avoid procrastination, but how to procrastinate well. There are three variants of procrastination, depending on what you do instead of working on something: you could work on (a) nothing, (b) something less important, or (c) something more important. That last type, I'd argue, is good procrastination. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The most dangerous form of procrastination is unacknowledged type-B procrastination [putting off important things to do unimportant things], because it doesn't feel like procrastination. You're "getting things done." Just the wrong things. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 If you work on something you can finish in a day or two, you can expect to have a nice feeling of accomplishment fairly soon. If the reward is indefinitely far in the future, it seems less real. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Another reason people don't work on big projects is, ironically, fear of wasting time. What if they fail? Then all the time they spent on it will be wasted. (In fact it probably won't be, because work on hard projects almost always leads somewhere.) 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 I think the way to "solve" the problem of procrastination is to let delight pull you instead of making a to-do list push you. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 European public opinion will apparently tolerate people being fired in industries where they really care about performance. Unfortunately the only industry they care enough about so far is soccer. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The first type of judgement is the type where judging you is the end goal. But in fact there is a second much larger class of judgements where judging you is only a means to something else. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The more you realize that most judgements are greatly influenced by random, extraneous factors - that most people judging you are more like a fickle novel buyer than a wise and perceptive magistrate - the more you realize you can do things to influence the outcome. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 One thing that leads us astray here is that the selector seems to be in a position of power. That makes him seem like a judge. If you regard someone judging you as a customer instead of a judge, the expectation of fairness goes away. The author of a good novel wouldn't complain that readers were unfair for preferring a potboiler with a racy cover. Stupid, perhaps, but not unfair. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Someone trying to live well would seem eccentrically abstemious in most of the US. That phenomenon is only going to become more pronounced. You can probably take it as a rule of thumb from now on that if people don't think you're weird, you're living badly. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 If you'd asked me as a kid how rich people became poor, I'd have said by spending all their money. That's how it happens in books and movies, because that's the colorful way to do it. But in fact the way most fortunes are lost is not through excessive expenditure, but through bad investments. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 The most dangerous way to lose time is not to spend it having fun, but to spend it doing fake work. When you spend time having fun, you know you're being self-indulgent. Alarms start to go off fairly quickly. If I woke up one morning and sat down on the sofa and watched TV all day, I'd feel like something was terribly wrong. But the same alarms don't go off on the days when I get nothing done, because I'm doing stuff that seems, superficially, like real work. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 I actually worry a lot that as I get "popular" I'll be able to get away with saying stupider stuff than I would have dared say before. This sort of thing happens to a lot of people, and I would really like to avoid it. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Everyone by now presumably knows about the danger of premature optimization. I think we should be just as worried about premature design - designing too early what a program should do. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 For the most ambitious young people, the corporate ladder is obsolete. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Small-business customers are very conservative and very cheap. We don't have to explain ourselves for the most part. 
Author: Paul Graham
Nationality: American
b. December 1964
  
 Heisenberg and many millions with him should be forced to see these camps and the martyred people. 
Author: Lise Meitner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 07 November 1878  - d. 27 October 1968
  
 You all worked for Nazi Germany. And you tried to offer only a passive resistance. Certainly, to buy off your conscience you helped here and there a persecuted person, but millions of innocent human beings were allowed to be murdered without any kind of protest being uttered. First you betrayed your friends, then your children in that you let them stake their lives on a criminal war – and finally that you betrayed Germany itself, because when the war was already quite hopeless, you did not once arm yourselves against the senseless destruction of Germany. 
Author: Lise Meitner
Nationality: Swedish
b. 07 November 1878  - d. 27 October 1968
  
 At the last dim horizon, we search among ghostly errors of observations for landmarks that are scarcely more substantial. The search will continue. The urge is older than history. It is not satisfied and it will not be oppressed. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 The universe is unfolding as it should. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 Observations always involve theory. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 The great spirals apparently lie outside our stellar system. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 We find them smaller and fainter, in constantly increasing numbers, and we know that we are reaching into space, farther and farther, until, with the faintest nebulae that can be detected with the greatest telescopes, we arrive at the frontier of the known universe. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 Past time is finite, future time is infinite. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 Positive, objective knowledge is public property. It can be transmitted directly from one person to another, it can be pooled, and it can be passed on from one generation to the next. Consequently, knowledge accumulates through the ages, each generation adding its contribution. Values are quite different. By values, I mean the standards by which we judge the significance of life. The meaning of good and evil, of joy and sorrow, of beauty, justice, success-all these are purely private convictions, and they constitute our store of wisdom. They are peculiar to the individual, and no methods exist by which universal agreement can be obtained. Therefore, wisdom cannot be readily transmitted from person to person, and there is no great accumulation through the ages. Each man starts from scratch and acquires his own wisdom from his own experience. About all that can be done in the way of communication is to expose others to vicarious experience in the hope of a favorable response. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 Science is the one human activity that is truly progressive. The body of positive knowledge is transmitted from generation to generation. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 The history of astronomy is a history of receding horizons. 
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 With increasing distance, our knowledge fades, and fades rapidly. Eventually, we reach the dim boundary—the utmost limits of our telescopes. There, we measure shadows, and we search among ghostly errors of measurement for landmarks that are scarcely more substantial. The search will continue. Not until the empirical resources are exhausted, need we pass on to the dreamy realms of speculation.  
Author: Edwin Hubble
Nationality: Swedish
b. 20 November 1889  - d. 28 September 1053
  
 Although the problem of transmuting chemical elements into each other is much older than a satisfactory definition of the very concept of chemical element, it is well known that the first and most important step towards its solution was made only nineteen years ago by the late Lord Rutherford, who started the method of the nuclear bombardments. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 Such a weapon goes far beyond any military objective and enters the range of very great natural catastrophes. By its very nature it cannot be confined to a military objective but becomes a weapon which in practical effect is almost one of genocide. It is clear that the use of such a weapon cannot be justified on any ethical ground which gives a human being a certain individuality and dignity even if he happens to be a resident of an enemy country. The fact that no limits exist to the destructiveness of this weapon makes its very existence and the knowledge of its construction a danger to humanity as a whole. It is necessarily an evil thing considered in any light. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 Where are they? 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 I cannot think of a single one, not even intelligence.  
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 I hope it won't take long. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 If I could remember the names of all these particles, I'd be a botanist. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 There are two possible outcomes: if the result confirms the hypothesis, then you've made a measurement. If the result is contrary to the hypothesis, then you've made a discovery. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 Before I came here I was confused about this subject. Having listened to your lecture I am still confused. But on a higher level. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 The fundamental point in fabricating a chain reacting machine is of course to see to it that each fission produces a certain number of neutrons and some of these neutrons will again produce fission. 
Author: Enrico Fermi
Nationality: American
b. December 1901  - d.  December 1954
  
 What I found even more pleasing than romancing my muse was the quality of the commentary here. A minimum of snark, a maximum of actual thoughtful perspective about the topic at hand - how very rare. And what a great experience for a writer. Every day, I looked forward to what you had to say. 
Author: Denise Caruso
Nationality: American
b. December 1956
  
  He was given to fits of rage, Jewish, liberal paranoia, male chauvinism, self-righteous misanthropy, and nihilistic moods of despair. He had complaints about life, but never solutions. He longed to be an artist, but balked at the necessary sacrifices. In his most private moments, he spoke of his fear of death which he elevated to tragic heights when, in fact, it was mere narcissism. 
Author: Meryl Streep
Nationality: American
b. 22 June 1949
  
 In science, conjecture drives both experiment and theory for it is only by forming conjectures (hypotheses) that we can make the direction of our experiments and theories informed. If such and such is true, then I should be able to do this experiment and look for this particular result or I should be able to find this theoretical formulation. Conversely, experiment and theory drive conjecture. One makes a startling observation or has a sudden insight and begins to speculate on its significance and implications and to draw possible conclusions (conjecture). 
Author: Robert Curl
Nationality: American
b. 23 July 1933
  
 Gentlemen, we have a master; this young man does everything, can do everything and will do everything. 
Author: Abbé Emmanuel Joseph Sieyes
Nationality: French
b. 03 March 1748  - d. 20 June 1836
  
 No matter who you are, engaging in the quest to discover where and how things began tends to induce emotional fervor—as if knowing the beginning bestows upon you some form of fellowship with, or perhaps governance over, all that comes later. So what is true for life itself is no less true for the universe: knowing where you came from is no less important than knowing where you are going. 
Author: Neil deGrasse Tyson
Nationality: African-American
b. 05 October 1958
  
 During our brief stay on planet Earth, we owe ourselves and our descendants the opportunity to explore - in part because it's fun to do. But there's a far nobler reason. The day our knowledge of the cosmos ceases to expand, we risk regressing to the childish view that the universe figuratively and literally revolves around us. In that bleak world, arms-bearing, resource-hungry people and nations would be prone to act on their "low contracted prejudices." And that would be the last gasp of human enlightenment—until the rise of a visionary new culture that could once again embrace the cosmic perspective. 
Author: Neil deGrasse Tyson
Nationality: African-American
b. 05 October 1958
  
 Life is but a momentary glimpse of the wonder of this atonishing universe, and it is sad to see so many dreaming it away on spirituality fantasy. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 Faith: is expecting god to make your car move, when the fuel tank is empty Science and logic: is knowing it won't go when the fuel tank is empty.  
Author: Greg Olson-Hyde
Nationality: Australian
b. 29 June 1949
  
 American scientists are less religious than the American public generally, and the most distinguished scientists are the least religious of all. 
Author: Richard Dawkins
Nationality: British
b. 26 March 1941
  
 Scientists had to suffer torture, silencing, imprisonment and death at the hands of Christians who didn't agree with newly discovered facts about the world. Christianity lost the first battle with astronomers who realized that, contrary to what Christians asserted, the Sun did not orbit the Earth, and that the Universe doesn't seem to be designed specifically for humankind. Copernicus - 1473-1543, Kepler - 1571-1630 Galileo - 1564-1642 Newton - 1643-1727 Laplace - 1749-1827 All fought battles against the Church when they published scientific papers challenging religious orthodoxy. Bible verses were all the theories Christians needed; and Joshua 10:12-13, 2 Kings 20:11, Isaiah 38:8 and Isaiah 30:26 all contradicted astronomers. Eventually, the Church retreated, only to go on to fight similar ignorant battles, and violently impose dogmatic errors, in the arenas of physics, biology and philosophy. 
Author: Vexen Crabtree
Nationality: British   
 Hope lies in dreams, in imagination, and in the courage of those who dare to make dreams into reality. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 I pictured myself as a virus or a cancer cell and tried to sense what it would be like. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 Nothing happens quite by chance. It's a question of accretion of information and experience. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 My introduction to the platform of the National Secular Society was quite accidental. I had heard none of its speakers, read none of its publications, except an occasional glance at Bradlaugh's National Reformer. I knew there was a Freethought movement afoot, but that was about all. 
Author: Chapman Cohen
Nationality: British
b. 01 September 1868  - d. 04 February 1954
  
 The speaker was opposed by an old gentleman – at least he seemed old to me – who suffered from an impediment in his speech. The lecturer in replying spent part of his time in mimicking the old gentleman's speech. After he had "replied," the lecturer asked for more opposition. Mainly because of his treatment of the old man I accepted the invitation. 
Author: Chapman Cohen
Nationality: British
b. 01 September 1868  - d. 04 February 1954
  
 For about forty-four years I have been busy in the interests of Freethought with my pen as well as with my tongue, and for about forty-two years I have been a regular writer for one of the oldest Freethought journals in Europe, and with a single exception, the oldest in the world. For twenty-four years I have been the official editor of that journal, and for the same period, President of the National Secular Society, the only organization for the propagation of militant Freethought in the British Isles. My career as a lecturer – continuously lecturing – is a record in the history of the Freethought movement. 
Author: Chapman Cohen
Nationality: British
b. 01 September 1868  - d. 04 February 1954
  
 Gods are fragile things; they may be killed by a whiff of science or a dose of common sense.  
Author: Chapman Cohen
Nationality: British
b. 01 September 1868  - d. 04 February 1954
  
 The belief in God is not therefore based on the perception of design in nature. Belief in design in nature is based upon the belief in God. Things are as they are whether there is a God or not. Logically, to believe in design one must start with God. He, or it, is not a conclusion but a datum. You may begin by assuming a creator, and then say he did this or that; but you cannot logically say that because certain things exist, therefore there is a God who made them. God is an assumption, not a conclusion. And it is an assumption that explains nothing. 
Author: Chapman Cohen
Nationality: British
b. 01 September 1868  - d. 04 February 1954
  
 Atheist is really a thoroughly honest, unambiguous term, it admits of no paltering and no evasion, and the need of the world, now as ever, is for clear-cut issues and unambiguous speech. 
Author: Chapman Cohen
Nationality: British
b. 01 September 1868  - d. 04 February 1954
  
 I don't want to believe. I want to know. 
Author: Carl Sagan
Nationality: American
b. 09 November 1934  - d. 20 December 1996
  
 A man's ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy, education, and social ties; no religious basis is necessary. Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear of punishment and hope of reward after death. 
Author: Albert Einstein
Nationality: American
b. 14 March 1879  - d. 18 April 1955
  
 The earth is flat, and anyone who disputes this claim is an atheist who deserves to be punished. 
Author: Sheik Abdel-Aziz Ibn Baaz
Nationality: Arabian
b. 21 November 1910  - d. 13 May 1999
  
 As a child I was not interested in science. I was merely interested in things human, the human side of nature, if you like, and I continue to be interested in that. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 My intention was to go to medical school, and then become a medical scientist. I did not intend to practice medicine, although in medical school, and in my internship, I did all the things that were necessary to qualify me in that regard. I had opportunities along the way to drop the idea of medicine and go into science. At one point at the end of my first year of medical school, I received an opportunity to spend a year in research and teaching in biochemistry, which I did. And at the end of that year, I was told that I could, if I wished, switch and get a Ph.D. in biochemistry but my preference was to stay with medicine. And, I believe that this is all linked to my original ambition, or desire, which was to be of some help to humankind, so to speak, in a larger sense than just on a one-to-one basis 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 I thought how nice it would be if a place like this existed and I was invited to work there. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 In the end, what may have more significance is my creation of the institute and what will come out of it, because of its example as a place for excellence, a creative environment for creative minds. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 The reward for work well done is the opportunity to do more. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 I have had dreams and I have had nightmares, but I have conquered my nightmares because of my dreams. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 Intuition will tell the thinking mind where to look next. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 Nothing happens quite by chance. It's a question of accretion of information and experience. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It's my partner. 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 No one. Could you patent the sun? 
Author: Jonas Edward Salk
Nationality: American
b. 28 October 1914  - d. 23 June 1995
  
 There is still no cure for the common birthday. 
Author: John Herschel Glenn
Nationality: American
b. 18 July 1921
  
 The most important thing we can do is inspire young minds and to advance the kind of science, math and technology education that will help youngsters take us to the next phase of space travel. 
Author: John Herschel Glenn
Nationality: American
b. 18 July 1921
  
 I don't know what you could say about a day in which you have seen four beautiful sunsets. 
Author: John Herschel Glenn
Nationality: American
b. 18 July 1921
  
 This is a day we have managed to avoid for a quarter of a century. 
Author: John Herschel Glenn
Nationality: American
b. 18 July 1921
  
 One must note that unlike the tenets of science, no tenets of religion are ever revised when new information comes to light. 
Author: Archaeopteryx
Nationality: American
b. December 1948
  
 I wouldn't refute the sciences, but if I see an author manipulating information to fit a foregone conclusion, then yes, I would certainly refute his findings. I've seen idiots like Kent Hovind manipulate facts to prove that dinosaurs and humans lived on the earth at the same time, and while I don't refute archaeology or paleontology, I most CERTAINLY refute "Science According To Hovind!" 
Author: Archaeopteryx
Nationality: American
b. December 1948
  
 First, never quote Mother Teresa at me - she was an evil hag who worshipped poverty, who did not help people except to encourage them to suffer more for her faith, while she lived in comfort and traveled far and wide to receive the accolades of the gullible. I would never find the words of that wicked woman persuasive. 
Author: Paul Zachary Myers
Nationality: American
b. 09 March 1957
  
 Secondly, the standard bullying tactics of waving bloody fetuses might cow the squeamish, but I’m a biologist. I’ve guillotined rats. I’ve held eyeballs in my hand and peeled them apart with a pair of scissors. I’ve used a wet-vac to clean up a lake of half-clotted blood from an exsanguinated dog. I’ve opened bodies and watched the intestines do their slow writhing dance, I’ve been elbow deep in blood, I’ve split open cats and stabbed them in the heart with a perfusion needle. I’ve extracted the brains of mice…with a pair of pliers. I’ve scooped brains out of buckets, I’ve counted dendrites in slices cut from the brains of dead babies. You want to make me back down by trying to inspire revulsion with dead baby pictures? I look at them unflinchingly and see meat. And meat does not frighten me. 
Author: Paul Zachary Myers
Nationality: American
b. 09 March 1957
  




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